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Crackers?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Happy New Year! I need toddler feeding advice. I try to avoid processed foods and stick to whole foods, but everytime my daughter (14 months) gets a cracker or bread she is in heaven. So, on the occasions I give them to her, what is my best, healthy cracker option?

post #2 of 11

It really depends on your perception of healthy.  I have yet to find any widely available cracker that would be "healthy" by TF standards - most of them have "bad" fats, and almost all of them have plain white flour.  I can sometimes get a soaked grain one from a local TF "restaurant", but they're expensive. 

 

I suppose my "healthiest" cracker would be a simple nut cracker that I make with almond flour and egg white.  But since I can't find soaked almond flour...

 

You can also make them from dry cheeses like parmesan, but they get expensive fast.  And I don't think my toddler would be nearly as fond of either of these as he is of plain ole saltines. 

 

For your healthiest option, you're looking at making them yourself with soaked/sprouted grains and good fats.  Which isn't that difficult, but can be time consuming.  So it's all about your level of comfort.

 

I usually buy corn tortilla flatbread from TJs.  But I just looked at the back of the pkg and apparently they changed the ingredients.  I was buying them because they were GF, which they are not any longer. 

 

 

post #3 of 11

Indeed, your best bet would be to make your own! I researched a lot and you can hardly find any decent crackers on the market. You might find some seed and nut based crackers at Whole Foods but they are really expensive and to tell you teh truth, my daughter loves my crackers better than those!

If you stop giving her store bought crackers she'll eventually forget about it..it's the best time to do it now since she's still a toddler..

It would be best to bake a larger batch of crackers and freeze them. Then you can warm them up in the oven before eating.

You can choose organic sprouted flours and grains; I soak my raw almonds over night and then place them in the blender with some water and stevia. Then you drain them and you'll both have some fresh almond milk and "pulp" that you can use for baking. Leftovers can be frozen.    

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cristeen View Post

I suppose my "healthies t" cracker would be a simple nut cracker that I make with almond flour and egg white.  But since I can't find soaked almond flour...

 

You can also make them from dry cheeses like parmesan, but they get expensive fast.  And I don't think my toddler would be nearly as fond of either of these as he is of plain ole saltines. 

 


We're on GAPS diet and I usually make this recipe to which I also add 1 grated carrot and 1/2 cup of parmesan.

I make my own almond flour from soaked and dehydrated almonds.

 

http://cavemanfood.blogspot.com/2009/04/grain-free-almond-crackers.html
 

 

post #5 of 11
Nut Thins, my friend says.
post #6 of 11

Nut thins are good, my kids love them! They are of course, processed though. I make some out of almond meal and parmesan, will try to find the recipe. My kids only like them if they haven't had store-bought crackers in awhile. 

post #7 of 11

I don't mind making them but how do you make a reasonable number in the oven without it taking all day? I have four kids -- they could eat the whole batch before they have time to cool!

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandraMort View Post

I don't mind making them but how do you make a reasonable number in the oven without it taking all day? I have four kids -- they could eat the whole batch before they have time to cool!



Most of us who make crackers would probably do our best to keep the kids from eating the whole batch in one sitting, which might mean banning them from the kitchen or making them after bedtime.  redface.gif

 

Here, 1 or 2 crackers is a snack, I don't let my DS have a lot of them because I'd rather he were eating a more nutrient dense food. 

 

As for the logistics of making them, it depends on the type of cracker.  With nut thins, I use a (v.small) cookie scoop and a tart tamper covered in plastic wrap and dipped in water.  1 cup of almond meal makes 4-5 dozen crackers, it's a tiny amount per cracker.  Scoop, scoop, scoop, scoop, tamp, tamp, tamp, tamp, I can probably do a half sheet pan in 2 minutes.  For a more traditional rolled dough, I suppose you could always try a pasta maker and a pizza cutter for quicker rolling/cutting.  If you're not experienced with rolling dough evenly you might want to invest in either a pin with the depth markers on either end or even just a set of stick that are an even width on either side of the dough as you're rolling (think square dowel).

 

Multiple baking sheets with silpats are crucial for large quantities of baked goods, IMO, whether you're talking crackers or cookies.  I have 3 commercial half-sheet pans and for most purposes that is plenty.  Cooling racks are also crucial (I have a tiered folding rack that will hold either the sheets or cooling racks so I don't take up all my counter space doing this). 

 

Most crackers I've made cook in under 20 minutes (most in about 10).  So you fill a sheet, pop it in the oven, move on to the next sheet, pop it in the oven, pull out the first sheet, set it aside to cool a bit, fill another sheet, pop it in, and it's just a round robin dance.  When the first tray out of the oven is cool enough they won't shatter, move them to the cooling rack and fill it again and just continue the dance.  It's not like baking bread where you can stick it in the oven and walk away for an hour, it is mostly all active time with crackers. 

 

Depending on the age of the kids though, maybe you should get them involved in making them. 

post #9 of 11

The easiest crackers I've found were bannocks, with the dough sliced really thin.  You can also slice bread very thin, and then bake in an oven to dry out, a la melba toast.  You can brush with some butter or other fat halfway through drying, an sprinkle with salt.  Cracker recipes that you roll into a log and slice the dough are less time consuming, and the kids can do the cutting, placing on sheet work.  If you do a recipe with rolled out dough, roll it onto your cookie sheet and cut it with a pizza cutter before baking.  All that being said, we don't eat many grains anymore, and now that I'm a single mom we don't have time to make crackers!  The Mary's Gone Crackers kind are the best ones in the store I've seen...but when I'm buying crackers I usually go for Nuthins cause they're cheaper.

post #10 of 11

There are several cracker recipes at www.elanaspantry.com.

 

I'm just visiting here as we're vegetarians and I don't know what all you eat. My daughter can't eat gluten, dairy, and cane sugar. There are few packaged products we can buy. We do like these crackers. http://crunchmaster.elsstore.com/view/product/?id=56381&cid=91

 


Ingredients: brown rice flour, sesame seeds, potato starch, quinoa seeds, safflower oil, flax seeds, amaranth seeds, tamari soy sauce powder (tamari soy sauce [soybeans, salt], maltodextrin [corn]), salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #11 of 11

I forgot to add that www.elanaspantry.com is basically paleo. She bakes with almond flour and some coconut flour.

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