or Connect
Mothering › Groups › August 2012 Birth Club › Discussions › Protein Sources

Protein Sources - Page 2

post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ithappened View Post

do people have a favorite protein powder?



I just bought one last night at Krogers.  Not sure if you'll have that near you as it seems to be a Midwest only store.  But it's Naturally Preferred Whey Protein Powder in vanilla.  It was awesome in a smoothie!  I've read a few other reviews online that said the same thing.  We're hooked!

post #22 of 47

I haven't been doing shakes lately because I can eat okay, but my absolute favorite protein powder in the past is the Extreme Milk Chocolate from ON (you can get it online or at GNC, I believe).

post #23 of 47

Lots of great ideas! Here are just a couple more:

 

Add wheat germ to things. I toast it and mix it into pancakes and oatmeal. It can also go in smoothies. You can make tasty vegetarian protein balls by mixing peanut butter and wheat germ with a little honey. If you have kids (or want to have fun with it) you can add stripes of cocoa powder applied with a toothpick and almond sliver wings and call them bees!

 

Use quinoa instead of rice or other grains, or make tasty cold quinoa salads (similar to tabouleh or wheat berry salad). Really good curried with raisins! It's actually a whole protein by itself, unlike most other veggie sources.

 

I must confess, right now I am drinking a strawberry cheesecake milkshake (just popped a slice of cheesecake in the blender), so I totally get the sweettooth thing. Cheesecake has protein, right?

 

 

post #24 of 47

I've been loving kefir as an on-the-go protein and calcium source.  I was feeling that desperate "I can't eat anymore" too, but kefir is nice and quick, goes down smoothly, and you can drink it on the go (which you can't do with yogurt and stuff).  I'm trying to boost both protein and calcium here in the second tri.

post #25 of 47

 

Quote:

I must confess, right now I am drinking a strawberry cheesecake milkshake (just popped a slice of cheesecake in the blender), so I totally get the sweettooth thing. Cheesecake has protein, right?

 

 

 

omg- that sounds amazing.

 

 

Does anyone make their own kefir? I was considering trying but no idea how hard it would be to mess up :)

post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ithappened View Post

 

Does anyone make their own kefir? I was considering trying but no idea how hard it would be to mess up :)



I was gifted some grains from a friend and made a very successful batch.  Super easy.  Then my baby got sick and I killed the grains. :(  But it's not too bad really.  You just need to keep a loose (daily) eye on it.

post #27 of 47
Quote:

Originally Posted by CCoello View Post

 

Use quinoa instead of rice or other grains, or make tasty cold quinoa salads (similar to tabouleh or wheat berry salad). Really good curried with raisins! It's actually a whole protein by itself, unlike most other veggie sources.

 

I must confess, right now I am drinking a strawberry cheesecake milkshake (just popped a slice of cheesecake in the blender), so I totally get the sweettooth thing. Cheesecake has protein, right?

 

 


About the quinoa: when we were gluten free years ago, my favorite breakfast was quinoa with some slivered almonds, cinnamon, and dried cranberries tossed together.  So good!

 

And the cheesecake in a blender? Genius, awesome, and JEALOUS!  winky.gif

 

post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thandiwe View Post


About the quinoa: when we were gluten free years ago, my favorite breakfast was quinoa with some slivered almonds, cinnamon, and dried cranberries tossed together.  So good!

 

And the cheesecake in a blender? Genius, awesome, and JEALOUS!  winky.gif

 


I had been on a HUGE quinoa kick for the past year would eat that same breakfast mix (w/a little coconut oil) every single day.  Then followed w/some sort of quinoa salad variation for lunch!  Since being pregnant, unfortunately quinoa has somehow found it's way on my "Food Aversions" list and I can no longer eat it in my usual ways.  I can still sneak it in my soups though, thankfully....

 

post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewMumJoy View Post


I had been on a HUGE quinoa kick for the past year would eat that same breakfast mix (w/a little coconut oil) every single day.  Then followed w/some sort of quinoa salad variation for lunch!  Since being pregnant, unfortunately quinoa has somehow found it's way on my "Food Aversions" list and I can no longer eat it in my usual ways.  I can still sneak it in my soups though, thankfully....

 



No!!  That sucks!!  I hope the aversion lets up after birth. 

post #30 of 47

I make a big batch of plain quinoa in advance so that I can incorporate into as many meals as possible during week (even though I still can't stand it these days)...... Right now I'm having it with some cottage cheese and peaches - should be yummy, but I'm gagging on the quinoa with every bite!!

 

Been having a lot more dairy lately to keep up the protein.... but sometimes I worry that too much dairy would make baby prone to lactose intolerance (just like too many peanuts = nut allergies)??  I sometimes read bad things about pasteurized/homogenized milk - which is the only kind I can get around here.....

post #31 of 47

I almost exclusively ate dairy for protein when I was pregnant with Cecilia-- the smell of meat made me sick the whole pregnancy. She adores dairy as much as I do now, so for me, that has definitely not been our experience! orngbiggrin.gif

post #32 of 47

Yes - I have also heard reports of babies enjoying foods that their mamas ate regularly while in utero, which is encouraging.... all the more reason that I'm forcing down my veggies (and variety) now so that hopefully I don't have a picky eater down the road!

post #33 of 47

very true- I lived off of thai and indian food with DS pregnancy as well as watermelon and he loves them all.. esp super spicy curries too :)

post #34 of 47

NewMumJoy, there have been no scientific studies to support the idea that what a mother eats during pregnancy plays any role whatsoever in food allergies.  Food allergies continue to be a real mystery, but there's no reason you shouldn't eat lots of dairy since the calcium is super healthy for your little one's bones (and it's not terrible bioavailable from other sources).  My husband is a dietician with life-threatening food allergies, so we're sort of experts on the subject! 

post #35 of 47

LilyTiger - I'm glad to hear that!  Hey, do you have any opinion on raw milk vs. pasteurized milk??  My SIL and my parents have both gotten into raw milk recently and refuse to "go back" to "mainstream" milk!

post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewMumJoy View Post

LilyTiger - I'm glad to hear that!  Hey, do you have any opinion on raw milk vs. pasteurized milk??  My SIL and my parents have both gotten into raw milk recently and refuse to "go back" to "mainstream" milk!



I have a lot of friends who refuse to go back to pasteurized milk due to the incredible health benefits of raw milk.  If it were cheaper/easier to access here, I would use it too!

post #37 of 47

NewMumJoy, DH isn't as crunchy as I am, but he did say to be aware that there's been a rash of food borne illnesses as a result of increased consumption of raw milk.  The important thing (and this is me now) is to visit the farm if you can.  Any legitimate operation should allow visitors, pretty much at any time (within reason, obviously).  If they put you off or don't allow you access to large parts of the farm, it's a warning signal.  I personally wouldn't drink raw milk during pregnancy, just because your immune system is less able to handle pathogens.  If you have a farm you trust or you own your own cows/sheep/goats and can ensure the cleanliness (as much as possible) of the milking tools and the health of the animals, I don't see any reason to avoid it for normal people.  But for immune suppressed women (and that's us), it just doesn't seem worth the risk to me.

post #38 of 47

I definitely agree w/the importance of knowing your source if you're going w/raw milk, LilyTiger... Because we relocate so frequently, it's hard for me to get to know and connect with our local sources (if there are any at all) and thus I agree that it's too much of a risk at this time for me to enjoy during pregnancy...  

post #39 of 47

 

Quote:
he did say to be aware that there's been a rash of food borne illnesses as a result of increased consumption of raw milk.

 

there are some huge risk which for me I just feel too nervous about to do while pregnant.. I have no problem with raw milk/cheese when not pregnant but try to avoid it a lot more when pregnant, although Im not 100% about it innocent.gif when I know the source and such, I will drink/eat it with caution during pregnancy but often rely on pasturized milk/chesse the majority of the time.. but I have to admit, I do slip, esp with goat products :)

post #40 of 47

We had switched to raw milk about 4 months before we conceived, and I was LOVING IT - so much tastier and actually fun to have something non-homogenized! We made butter and other things with the cream. However, I got nervous about drinking it pregnant, especially because my FIL's mother died when he was a baby of brucellosis, which is spread by non-homogenized milk (and curable by modern antibiotics, but still). I just realized that if I lost the baby due to something so incredibly preventable like drinking milk I was driving an hour round-trip and paying extra to get, I would feel like an IDIOT.

 

I hope to switch back at some point, although I don't miss the drive. It's illegal where I live in RI, and in MA (which is really very close by) you can only buy it directly from the farmer, only if he/she sells it directly from the milkroom. This means that you definitely have to visit the farm and check it out, but it is kind of a hassle. When we had a CSA and egg share with farmers nearby, it made the trip more worth it, but we don't have those now in the dead of winter either... sigh.

  Return Home
  Back to Forum: August 2012 Birth Club
Mothering › Groups › August 2012 Birth Club › Discussions › Protein Sources