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E-Book Haters Solidarity Thread - Page 3

post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post

(Lengthy ebook lover post...you've been warned ;))

 

No apologies necessary!  I should say that I'm not anti-technology.  In fact, the advent of the computer age has made it possible for me to achieve a work/family balance that would have been inconceivable in my profession even 20 year ago.  I love all the on-line research databases.  I love that I can basically do my work anywhere, anytime because of the internet, etc.  Heck, there are days that my colleagues don't even know I'm not in the office, simply because of the electronic connection.

 

That being said, don't know why I'm so blase about ebooks.  Maybe because it hasn't become a necessity in my life?  When it is, guess I'll bite the bullet and do it.

 

 

post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

Could they even do that, once it's been downloaded to the eReader? 

Yes, they can and have.  http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2009/07/why_2024_will_be_like_nineteen_eightyfour.html

post #43 of 60


Lovely. That's just lovely. Suddenly, those boxes of books I offloaded are seeming like a bad idea...

post #44 of 60
Kobo doesn't delete. You own the book you buy, rather than have a license for it like the kindle.
post #45 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post

Kobo doesn't delete. You own the book you buy, rather than have a license for it like the kindle.


Well, that's a relief. I didn't think I remembered reading anything like that. I guess my concern is could they delete, if they wanted to? I mean, are they physically able to do it? I realize that, if I own my ebooks, they'd be facing potential lawsuits left and right if they did it. I just wonder if they could.

post #46 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by EFmom View Post



Have you checked recently?  Most public libraries use Overdrive, and up until very recently, Amazon wouldn't allow the Kindle formats on Overdrive, but they've recently changed their minds.

 



So I checked today (very hopeful that I was wrong!!) and Kindle in Canada is not compatible with Overdrive yet...Soon I hope!  

post #47 of 60
I never ever thought I'd own an ereader. I've had a Nook simple touch for 2 weeks and I've already read 4 books on it. DD has read 2 books on it. This is twice the amount of reading we'd normally do. Incredible. I am happy to have both the ereader and real books. joy.gif
post #48 of 60

I LOVE my Kindle. Oh man, its so amazing (I just have the Kindle Touch). I love having all my books with me at all times, so that I can choose what to read based on my mood.

 

My aunt never thought she would like hers, but she loves it too. She especially likes it when she's travelling because she's one to take a million guidebooks with her about wherever it is she's visiting, and now she can put them all on her kindle and they weigh almost nothing.

post #49 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamalisa View Post

I always thought I wouldn't want one, but sometimes my RA makes it impossible to hold a hardcover so I am thinking it might be time.  Reading a thick book hunched over with it propped up on a pillow isn't as cozy as I like to be when I read.


That's why I broke down and bought one....my Mom has RA and it's much easier for her to handle than print books. I love it too...being able to get new books without leaving my chair is a fantasy come true!redface.gif It is hard not to spend too much $ but there is so much free stuff out there too.

post #50 of 60

for me part of the excitement of reading is holding the book and the whole book experience. nothing like the smell of the book, turning the pages. i remember things better too when i read off pages than the screen.

 

having said that i love my kindle due to its portability factor. the fact that i can have so many books at a fraction of the weight. 

 

while yes i enjoy reading from the e-reader it still does not beat actually having a book in hand. 

 

however i will say a lot of what i read i dont get on the ereader. 

 

when i started reading the elegance of a hedgehog i had to go get the book. it just wasnt the same reading it on a e-reader for me. i couldnt enjoy the language from the screen. there is something to just putting your book down in mid paragraph to think. 

 

at school i have some online textbooks. oooh i so hate the experience. i mean yeah i dont have to carry the book - but i wonder if my finger tips have little brains on them because the feel of the book adds to my studying skills.

 

ETA - so i finally went back and really read the whole thread. i had just glanced thru it and was smiling it was more elovers who were writing than haters :)

 

i used to be a hater too till i got mine. i still wont say i like it but its so convenient. but i had to use it myself to discover its own advantages.


Edited by meemee - 1/28/12 at 9:30am
post #51 of 60

My book collection might suggest that I would be very anti-ereader. I will always prefer physical books, but there is a place in my life for ebooks. When it comes to genre, I'm pretty much a one trick pony. And as my tastes have narrowed further to small press releases (mass market just doesn't cut it any more), reading devices are invaluable to me. To buy a hardcover, or even a trade pb, of some of my go-to authors would cost me perhaps $20-$50+! And, well, that's just not doable (gotta feed the kids!). Instead, I can spend under $5 and get to experience wordmanship that was previously out of my price range.

post #52 of 60

I recently read my first ebook (checked out via Overdrive from my local library) downloaded to my iPhone. It was an interesting experience. I liked having it with me so easily. I don't always carry the physical book I'm reading with me and so it was nice that I could pick it up on the iPhone and read it anytime I had some downtime. Initially I wasn't keen on reading it on the iPhone (which is not as nice for reading as the Kindle I believe) and I found it a little distracting, but it was a book I was eager to read so that wore off and I did enjoy it.

 

I think I prefer a nice trade paperback or a hardback, though. I am currently reading a small paperback that I got at the thrift store and it's about a tie with the ebook on the iPhone. The paper is thin and the type is small. A big hardback with nice high quality paper and good typography, though, that's just yummy. 

post #53 of 60

While I already mentioned that I enjoy both, I wanted to add that I don't think an ereader could replace books for most people right now. 

 

I like my ereader because it travels everywhere with me, while I really don't usually carry books with me. However, many of the books I want to read are not in a digital format. My current book club read (published 2007) is in hard copy, as this is the case. Unless it's popular, or a very new the book is unlikely to be in a digital format.

post #54 of 60

We use Project Gutenberg for some of the books in our hs curriculum. The files are available in a number of formats for a variety of e-readers. Check out Librivox.org for free audiobook versions of public domain (public domain in the U.S., that is) books. Volunteers record themselves reading the books and upload the files; you download them and transfer to your iPod or mp3 player. Easy peasy. Great for listening in the car.
 

I work in book publishing, and I can tell you that before the Kindle--and now all the other readers--became available, e-books were nothing more than a sort of tack-on to the endgame production stages of book making. My coworkers used to complain about our having to take the extra step of vetting the final PDFs of each book that was going to be converted to an e-book (not every book was slated for e-booking back then) to make sure the hyperlinks worked, etc. We didn't even have a decent viewing program at the time to use to "read" our books.  Then I went on maternity leave with DD, and 

the next year the Kindle hit the market. Now the e-book version of the books I work on "go to press" ahead of the print copy. I'm waiting for my first straight-to-e-book book--it seems the inevitable next step.  ;)

 

We just last week got our own Kindle, mostly with the intention of using it for reading our homeschooling books. I much prefer it to the backlit iPad's iBooks app or the Kindle app. I get nauseous staring at the iPad for too long. iBooks, though, helped to transform my husband into a reader. Worth the money and technology upgrade, IMO.

 

ETA: I still love hard copies of books, and we buy a lot used from Amazon or any used stores we come across. I use Paperbackswap a lot, too. But we have a tiny house and our library is meh, so e-books were inevitable as we move away from picture books as our kids get older.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post


I had actually never heard of this before. DH knew about it, but had completely forgotten it existed. I'm going to have to check it out. I'm not generally interested in the classics, but there are definitely a few things that interest me. Awesome. Thanks!

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyGG View Post



Love Project Gutenberg.

 

I thought the same thing. I like books and didn't see making the switch, but like others I got an ebook and am now hooked. I also do switch back and forth.

 

I have been having a blast this week downloading free books from Project Gutenberg. These are books that the copyright has expired on and are therefore public domain. My son has really discovered a love of the e reader and so my parents gave him one of their old ones (they just upgraded to new kindles). I however, refuse to buy him books. He can either check them out from the Library via Overdrive or get them free from Project Gutenberg. He's 8 and so far he has read, The Jungle Book, Just So Stories, Treasure Island from Project Gutenberg. He has read several books from the library. I have only bought him one book and that was one he needed to read for homework but left at school.



 

 

post #55 of 60

Wanted to mention that my kids have read some e-books, but I don't think they will ever replace real books for them. They are total bookworms and just love to leaf through beautiful books.

post #56 of 60

I like both - my kindle is great for traveling & at work. I also like to eat lunch at work while reading a novel & the kindle reduces the problem of how to keep the thick paperback open to the right page while trying to eat tidily.

 

However, I cannot take a kindle into the bath-tub.  I also can't take library books into the bath-tub. So used paperbacks will always be important to me.

post #57 of 60

I have to say I really love my Kindle. I got the cheap one and I have read several books from the library on it for free, and several free or 99cent books that I might not have tried otherwise. I am a night nurse and I find that it's easier to carry in my bag than books for those slower moments when patients are sleeping. I also need reading glasses but thanks to the font adjustment I can read in larger print without my glasses. :-) I use it at the gym, much easier than a real book because of the pages not flipping closed on the treadmill. 

 

It took me a long time to try one, but once I did I have to admit I like it. I still will read "real" books though too.

 

ETA: My kids still read the paper books-- I think that reading should be a tactile experience when you are younger-- involving more senses helps kids to learn better-- the feel of the pages, the weight of the book, the color pictures if there are any, and being able to flip back and forth. I also love the smell of library books.

post #58 of 60
I just finished reading a paper book from the library. Then I went and downloaded a Nook book in seconds. I love both! reading.gif
post #59 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by skreader View Post

However, I cannot take a kindle into the bath-tub.  I also can't take library books into the bath-tub. So used paperbacks will always be important to me.


 

Someone here on MDC pointed out that you can take an eReader into the tub. Seal it into a large Ziplock, and you're good to go. It's actually better than a book, because the bag doesn't hamper your ability to push the buttons - and random splashes have no effect whatsoever on it.

 

DH had already purchased my Kobo, as a birthday present, and I was reading the thread here with the above info. I read it out loud to him, in a "hey - maybe I should try one of these things" kind of way, and he was thinking, "I got her the perfect gift". It worked out realy well.

post #60 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post


 

Someone here on MDC pointed out that you can take an eReader into the tub. Seal it into a large Ziplock, and you're good to go. It's actually better than a book, because the bag doesn't hamper your ability to push the buttons - and random splashes have no effect whatsoever on it.

 

DH had already purchased my Kobo, as a birthday present, and I was reading the thread here with the above info. I read it out loud to him, in a "hey - maybe I should try one of these things" kind of way, and he was thinking, "I got her the perfect gift". It worked out realy well.


This is true! I have a special waterproof case I got for my Kindle. It is made of sturdy flexible plastic, and you can push all of the buttons through it. I use it when I take my ebook to the beach, in the bath, in a hot tub, etc. I think I've lost 3 or 4 books over the years by accidentally dropping the into the tub, and I have several with wrinkled pages from my wet fingers. I now really prefer my Kindle when bathing.
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