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Preparing an Emergency Food Kit with dietary restrictions - Page 2

post #21 of 51

You could try Costco online. 

 

http://www.costco.com/Common/Category.aspx?ec=BC-EC39718-Cat75277&pos=0&whse=BC&topnav=&cat=90741&eCat=BC|3605|75277|90741&lang=en-US

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure if something serious were to happen and food options were limited concerns about a diet would pretty much be trivial.

post #22 of 51

Oh and they have a 20 yr shelf life!  Even better!

post #23 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakcerka View Post

I'm pretty sure if something serious were to happen and food options were limited concerns about a diet would pretty much be trivial.



Children DIE from diarrhea during emergency situations. So giving my 3 year old daughter foods that irritate her intestines and make her have nasty diarrhea four times a day and put her at greater risk of dehydration and getting diarrhea caused by microbes from evacuation conditions could be FATAL.

 

I have a friend whose children have intestinal bleeding when they eat gluten. A woman I know with celiacs goes to bed with horrible cramps if she accidentally gets meat that is not organic because of the additives put in commercial meat. Others folks with sensitivities go into anaphylaxic shock and DIE when they eat the wrong foods. 

 

Concerns about diet are NOT TRIVIAL. THEY CAN BE DEADLY.

 

I do appreciate your time in giving me the costco link. Although the fruits and veggies would be safe, we don't need $100 of dried produce, we need dense calories with a bit of fruits and veggies thrown in if there is space in a transportable kit. The soups and sprouting seeds don't work because I want foods my 3 and 6 year olds can feed themselves should there be no surviving adults.

post #24 of 51


For how long?  How long are these kids supposed to survive on their diet without surviving adults?  And yes people can get very sick in those situations you're right.  However on the off chance my a$$ survives a disaster... I'm not going to worry about a diet.  I'm going to worry about how the hell I"m going to survive at all.  Holy ridiculous, you're hoping for a perfect situation in a disaster.  Say you do get all the foods you need stored and a disaster hits and somehow all the food you stored is destroyed too.  Then what?  And I'm being serious here.  There is no such thing as a perfect disaster.  I've had my disaster preparedness training.  Have you?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post



Children DIE from diarrhea during emergency situations. So giving my 3 year old daughter foods that irritate her intestines and make her have nasty diarrhea four times a day and put her at greater risk of dehydration and getting diarrhea caused by microbes from evacuation conditions could be FATAL.

 

I have a friend whose children have intestinal bleeding when they eat gluten. A woman I know with celiacs goes to bed with horrible cramps if she accidentally gets meat that is not organic because of the additives put in commercial meat. Others folks with sensitivities go into anaphylaxic shock and DIE when they eat the wrong foods. 

 

Concerns about diet are NOT TRIVIAL. THEY CAN BE DEADLY.

 

I do appreciate your time in giving me the costco link. Although the fruits and veggies would be safe, we don't need $100 of dried produce, we need dense calories with a bit of fruits and veggies thrown in if there is space in a transportable kit. The soups and sprouting seeds don't work because I want foods my 3 and 6 year olds can feed themselves should there be no surviving adults.



 

post #25 of 51
Do you do soy? What about those tetra packs of tofu? I would try to get some kind of tofu or meat (if you're willing to do meat in a true emergency), whatever you think your DD would tolerate best. I guess I'm not sure what else you are looking for at this point. If you include:

-packed tofu and/or tofu jerky (or some kind of meat)
-canned beans
-canned and/or dehydrated veggies
-dried fruit, containers of applesauce, etc.
-nuts & seeds (unsalted if you're worried about that)
-an assortment of GF chips, cookies, and crackers
-whatever soups your DD can eat (whether in a box or a can or instant soup)
-grains like rice, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, and GF pastas
-jars of pickled veggies
-GF sugar-free cereal; GF oats if she tolerates them
-rice or soy milk boxes, cans of coconut milk
-lara bars, chocolate, whatever sweets you usually have for treats
-homemade stuff you can yourself

That seems like a good assortment and lots of calories and all and most of it is easy for kids to deal with and little of it requires hot water or heating.
post #26 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post

Do you do soy? What about those tetra packs of tofu? I would try to get some kind of tofu or meat (if you're willing to do meat in a true emergency), whatever you think your DD would tolerate best. I guess I'm not sure what else you are looking for at this point. If you include:
-packed tofu and/or tofu jerky (or some kind of meat)
-canned beans
-canned and/or dehydrated veggies
-dried fruit, containers of applesauce, etc.
-nuts & seeds (unsalted if you're worried about that)
-an assortment of GF chips, cookies, and crackers
-whatever soups your DD can eat (whether in a box or a can or instant soup)
-grains like rice, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, and GF pastas
-jars of pickled veggies
-GF sugar-free cereal; GF oats if she tolerates them
-rice or soy milk boxes, cans of coconut milk
-lara bars, chocolate, whatever sweets you usually have for treats
That seems like a good assortment and lots of calories and all and most of it is easy for kids to deal with and little of it requires hot water or heating.


These are the kinds of ideas I'm looking for. Today I was thinking about the flat bananas they have at Trader Joe's. They can help with loose stools.At least I assume in a dried condition they could.

post #27 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakcerka View Post

For how long?  How long are these kids supposed to survive on their diet without surviving adults?  And yes people can get very sick in those situations you're right.  However on the off chance my a$$ survives a disaster... I'm not going to worry about a diet.  I'm going to worry about how the hell I"m going to survive at all.  Holy ridiculous, you're hoping for a perfect situation in a disaster.  Say you do get all the foods you need stored and a disaster hits and somehow all the food you stored is destroyed too.  Then what?  And I'm being serious here.  There is no such thing as a perfect disaster.  I've had my disaster preparedness training.  Have you?
 

 

If I'm making an emergency kit, why would I include foods that would make my child sick? Maybe we won't get to the food, maybe it won't get transported with us.

 

But let's say it does. I truly want to know why I should pack foods that will make her sick?

 

post #28 of 51


I never said you had to pack foods that would make your kids sick.  I'm saying, you're going to have to dig a little further in case your perfect disaster preparedness does not materialize.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

If I'm making an emergency kit, why would I include foods that would make my child sick? Maybe we won't get to the food, maybe it won't get transported with us.

 

But let's say it does. I truly want to know why I should pack foods that will make her sick?

 



 

post #29 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakcerka View Post


I never said you had to pack foods that would make your kids sick.  I'm saying, you're going to have to dig a little further in case your perfect disaster preparedness does not materialize.
 



 



That's why I'm here. I'm trying to get info from folks who may have already figured this out. The Red Cross referred me to online foods, much like costco has. That's fine for me, my husband, and our son. In an emergency we could eat turkey on white bread with mayo. (gag.) But not my daughter. She would get diarrhea. So I'm trying to find out what is good to pack.

 

Trader Joe's has applesauce with carrots in squeeze bags. That would get her some vitamins. I hope.

post #30 of 51


hmm... do you know something I don't know or are you just getting prepared for the 2012 hype?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post



That's why I'm here. I'm trying to get info from folks who may have already figured this out. The Red Cross referred me to online foods, much like costco has. That's fine for me, my husband, and our son. In an emergency we could eat turkey on white bread with mayo. (gag.) But not my daughter. She would get diarrhea. So I'm trying to find out what is good to pack.

 

Trader Joe's has applesauce with carrots in squeeze bags. That would get her some vitamins. I hope.



 

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 

Just general preparedness. When you've got a kid on a special diet, the thought of them eating the wrong thing is scary. I've always relied on a well-stocked pantry as emergency food. However, now that my pantry is nearly empty and I use my freezer to store all my homemade foods, I can't do that any more. So I have to come up with an emergency stash. Even if it is in BPA ladened cans.

post #32 of 51

 

 

Quote:
However, now that my pantry is nearly empty and I use my freezer to store all my homemade foods, I can't do that any more. 

 

 

???

 

think outside of the can

 

I hardly keep any thing in cans and my pantry is full 

post #33 of 51

I've got to agree with serenbat here, I have a month or more worth of food in my pantry and only a small fraction of that is in cans. My emergency stash relies more on cans so I don't have to count on ability to cook the food in order to eat it.

 

My advice with your preferences and needs, is to focus on nuts, nut butters, dried fruits. Get a big bag of gluten free oats - those can be mixed with sweet or savory additions, and just need soaking to eat, no cooking needed. Coconut flakes. Maple syrup. Hemp and pumpkin and sunflower seeds.

post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

???

 

think outside of the can

 

I hardly keep any thing in cans and my pantry is full 

 

I'd be interested in what you stock. Because of my daughter's food restrictions there are almost no processed foods we can buy. Frankly I don't want processed foods anyways. I like using whole ingredients that I make into foods. And I don't want cans (though will resort to them if I have to for an emergency kit.)

 

So what do you have in your pantry that does not have:

meat (including fish)

gluten

dairy

cane sugar (if it simply says "sugar" we have to assume it is cane sugar unless the manufacturer guarantees differently)

tomatoes

 

Plus I don't do foods that have

MSG and related--nutritional yeast, turlane yeast, inactivated yeast, etc.

carageenan (an intestinal irritant that may be carcinogenic)

 

 

post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

I'd be interested in what you stock. Because of my daughter's food restrictions there are almost no processed foods we can buy. Frankly I don't want processed foods anyways. I like using whole ingredients that I make into foods. And I don't want cans (though will resort to them if I have to for an emergency kit.)

 

So what do you have in your pantry that does not have:

meat (including fish)

gluten

dairy

cane sugar (if it simply says "sugar" we have to assume it is cane sugar unless the manufacturer guarantees differently)

tomatoes

 

Plus I don't do foods that have

MSG and related--nutritional yeast, turlane yeast, inactivated yeast, etc.

carageenan (an intestinal irritant that may be carcinogenic)


I'm not serebat, but I wanted to say that we are in very similar circumstances, but with different restrictions.  Dd can't have processed foods with additives and preservatives, or very little of it.  We keep, for a stocked pantry in case of emergency a lot of dry beans, home-canned produce, root vegetables (that can overwinter in a cool, dry basement/cellar), dried herbs and spices, all-natural cracker products (not sure which ones would be gluten-free), grains of all sorts, some of which are useless to you (bulghur wheat, whole wheat berries, but then also quinoa, rice, popcorn, barley), a lot of pasta (I'm sure you can get gluten-free of this), flours (corn, rice, and then for us, wheat), sweeteners (lots of maple syrup, which keeps forever), oils, home pickled foods (cabbage, cucumbers, green tomatoes... again I know the tomatoes don't help, just putting it out there), and commercially pickled foods, homemade jams and butters (apple butter, pumpkin butter... will try pear butter when I get the chance this winter).  I also can some of my meat, but I honestly don't know what to do to help you substitute a shelf-stable protein, other than powdered eggs... not sure if you consider that dairy or not.  Powdered eggs are actually quite minimally processed even though it would not seem so... they're just dehydrated.  Which brings me to my other lovely contraption in my kitchen... my dehydrator.  You can dehydrate just about anything, it seems and keeps in a jar on the shelf almost indefinitely.   Hope some of those things jump start some ideas of what is shelf-stable but within your restrictions.

 

As for ideas for a go-bag, I would stick with commercially prepared foods that are within your restrictions.  You can't carry more than about 72 hours worth of supplies with you, anyway.  The idea for a go-bag is to get to your destination.  If you are going to shelter-in-place, your options are going to be much greater.

 

I also want to say that those emergency food kits are really not a good idea, anyway.  The last thing you need in a time of disaster is to open one of those up and find out that the food is disgusting or that you don't have the right tools to prepare it or that it happened to be that 1 - in - 100,000 kits that was not packaged properly and the food is not even edible.  If you don't already eat the food that's in your disaster kit, during a disaster is NOT the time to radically change your diet, whether it's restricted or not. It's best to put your own emergency supplies together and rotate through them.  Store what you eat and eat what you store.

 


Edited by velochic - 1/31/12 at 5:27am
post #36 of 51

 

 

Quote:
My advice with your preferences and needs, is to focus on nuts, nut butters, dried fruits. 

mine too!

 

I do keep shelled nuts in cool storage (not directly in the pantry closet) - I also keep lots of "leaves" - nettles (high in vit C) - you could make soup with them, raspberry leaf, mints (several types- good for tummies) strawberry leaf (another good for tummies), blueberry, various herbs dried (peppers, mushrooms, veggies-mostly onions and carrots, etc)

 

we are not gluten free, so dry "flours", lots of different seeds (for sprouting), cereals, canned items, canned juices, (both homemade) vinegars, oils - these are the type of things in my dry storage - we do keep canned salmon, beef jerkey

 

I'm not really sure of your long term goal here - to just take with you for ??? X# of weeks assuming you must leave and won't have a heat source? of if you are to stay put are you doing a alternative heat source?

 

I don't have "meals" in dry - I have ingredients and any "meals" are frozen 

I don't even know what "canned" items I would get to have on hand??

post #37 of 51

If you do end up choosing some canned goods could you donate them to a food bank? Maybe rotate them out a little early. If you keep the receipts you might get some of your money back as a charitable donation?

 

Are you planning an in home supply or do you want packs that can be carried with you? 

post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post


I'd be interested in what you stock. Because of my daughter's food restrictions there are almost no processed foods we can buy. Frankly I don't want processed foods anyways. I like using whole ingredients that I make into foods. And I don't want cans (though will resort to them if I have to for an emergency kit.)

So what do you have in your pantry that does not have:
meat (including fish)
gluten
dairy
cane sugar (if it simply says "sugar" we have to assume it is cane sugar unless the manufacturer guarantees differently)
tomatoes

Plus I don't do foods that have
MSG and related--nutritional yeast, turlane yeast, inactivated yeast, etc.
carageenan (an intestinal irritant that may be carcinogenic)


dry beans
dry rice
packaged pre-cooked rice
quinoa
rice and corn pastas
dried mushrooms
root vegetables and winter squashes
dry seaweed (not just the TJ's snacks but also dulse flakes, kombu, etc.)
olive oil
coconut oil
nuts & seeds
nut butters, seed butters like tahini & sunflower butter
dehydrated veggie snacks
dried fruit
chickpea flour, millet flout, brown rice flour, corn flour, almond flour, coconut flour, etc.
honey and/or maple syrup
tea, coffee
chocolate bars
tortilla chips, plantain chips, GF crackers
vegetable stock
vegetable soups (Amy's or TJ's)
pickled veggies
tons of spices, extracts, vinegars, mustards, etc.
rice paper wraps
GF cereals
popcorn kernels
plus a few canned/jarred items (olives, cooked beans, pumpkin puree, coconut milk, etc.)

These are just the things I can think of off the top of my head, our pantry is always well-stocked and we avoid many of the same things you do (plus some different things) and have only a few canned goods. Most of these things our in our weekly rotation but some, like canned beans, pre-cooked rice, soups, pastas, etc., are more for emergencies (major or just the "oh we haven't gone shopping in three weeks and don't have time to spend 2 hours cooking" emergencies lol).
post #39 of 51

OP can you make your won food packs (meals) and freeze them? I do them for my DH's lunch - certain things he eats cold, just defrosted.

 

Even if you lost power you would have "some" to start with- again, I guess I'm not sure your plan here - are you planning to take all this food with you to a shelter? I really can't imagine a foot locker size container and an emergency and the transport issues, storage issues, etc here???

post #40 of 51
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the ideas. My pantry is pretty much stocked like crunchy mommy's. I do have a lot of foods I made in the freezer that we can just heat and eat. Everything from mung bean tortillas to soups, gravies, sauces, etc. Lots of frozen fruits and veggies. However, if we have to evacuate nothing I can take with us. And if we lose power a lot of it will go bad quickly (except the flours I have in the freezer.) I've thought I might be able to take some of the frozen produce out in an extreme situation and try to sundry them.

 

Here's a good article I found. Actually the most like what I was looking for. Better than what the red cross had: http://www.livestrong.com/article/371448-5-basic-food-ingredients-for-survival/

 

What I want is a kit that I can take with us that will allow our daughter to eat as long as possible in an evacuation center or that we can use once we use up our stores at home.

 

Based on the responses here and that article I got online last night and looked for calorie dense foods that require no preparation, are lightweight, and, with the exception of olives, don't require a can opener. My plan is to keep them in a rolling suitcase, maybe even a rolling backpack, for convenient transfer. I do include mung beans for sprouting just so there's something fresh in there. A few of these things I need to taste before I buy in bulk. Here is a tentative list I've compiled. I need to look at more recommendations on the thread again, but at 1:30 last night this is as far as I go:

 

 

Justin's Nut Butter Natural Classic Almond Butter 10 Count Squeeze Packs 200 calories

Lara Bars

?seaweed

Fruit leathers or Clif Kid Organic Fruit Rope, Variety Pack, 8 Strawberry, 8 Mixed Berry, 8 Grape, Net Wt. 16.9 Oz. Pack of 24

Blue Diamond Almonds 100 Calories Per Bag

Calbee Snack Salad Snapea Crisps

Apple crushers (apple juice in squeeze bags)

Flat bananas from Trader Joe’s

Coconut oil

Rice dream 8 ounces

Oskri Muesli Bar, Gluten Free

Oskri Granola Bar, Pecans and Raisins

Mung beans in individual ziplock bags. Just add water

Chocolate bars (beet sugar sweetened)

Powdered eggs

Jelly individual

Crunchmaster Mulit-seed Original flavor crackers.

Raisins

Canned olives

Prepared meals that I can find in pouches

Dehydrated/freeze dried fruit

 

 

I am looking for a pedialyte type powder, but I fear that since she can't do cane sugar that I won't find one.

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