or Connect
Mothering › Groups › May 2012 Birth Club › Discussions › sleeping arrangements?

sleeping arrangements? - Page 3

post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by forestmushroom View Post

 

As soon as your little one sits up/ or pulls up on the side the co-sleep is a very dangerous place to sleep because the baby can fall over the edge.  The railing is so low on those, that a crawling, sitting baby *cannot* sleep in one.

 

 


The thing I really don't get though is that with DS we slept on a mattress, him and I.  No rails.  It didn't become an issue until about 9 mos when he started rolling off the bed.  Then I moved the mattress to the floor.  He never really pulled himself up, perhaps because he wasn't given the opportunity to do so.  I guess I'm just not understanding how a cosleeper is any different (more dangerous) than a bed. 

 

 

post #42 of 46

Baby can climb higher on the ledge of a co sleeper and flip over and land on its head? Its added height to climb on and gives the means to flip more so than  mattress?  That is what I am assuming anyways, never had one.

post #43 of 46

Yeah, on a regular bed there is no railing to keep baby in, or fall over. But regular beds are made/sold marketed for babies to sleep in...

 

  With a crib you can lower the mattress when baby begins to sit up, pull up on the railing... but you can't do this with a co-sleeper.  Most co-sleepers/bassinets state that they can only be used until baby can sit up/pull up. 

 

You can put a regular bed on the floor, so the height isn't a dangerous height for baby if s/he falls... but you can't really do that with a co-sleeper.....

post #44 of 46

We have a queen and bedshared with our 2yo dd for about a year and a half until I HAD to nightwean for sanity. It was really not a problem at all to transition her to her crib in our room and then her own room a few months later. I was so worried about it, but it was fine.

 

I LOVE the idea of kicking dh out of the bed for a few weeks! :-) That is genius. Having 3 of us in a queen for so long caused a lot of stress in my marriage, because it's a tight squeeze. Dh wants to snuggle and doesn't understand that nursing moms snuggle for most of the day, every day, and really don't want to be sandwiched in between 2 bodies in bed! Dh did end up sleeping downstairs for a few months while we were nightweaning and it was really nice to be able to stretch out and not be bothered by his movement and noises all night long. I may have to think about this some more...

 

We're planning to side car a crib this time to essentially use as an extension of our bed. I didn't learn to nurse while lying down for a few months with dd, but plan to do it right away this time. If I can figure out how to nurse while the baby is on the firm crib mattress, I will feel safer because our mattress is a little squishy. I slept so lightly with dd that I don't think it will ever be a danger to have the new baby nursing in bed with me, but I would sleep better if the mattress was harder!

 

I wanted to jump in the discussion about the Arm's Reach cosleeper. We had one for dd and used it for about 2 days. We have a mini one, and maybe it's different than the regular sized one, but you can't nurse the baby in the mini cosleeper. The cosleeper mattress is about 4 inches lower than the lowest side of the frame. We had it set up so that the frame was even with our mattress, so the cosleeper mattress was lower than our mattress.It is essentially a bassinet that attaches flush to the bed. I had some swelling from the birth and couldn't reach over to get dd in or out and it was actually harder on my back than getting a baby out of a bassinet would have been because it was attached to the bed so I couldn't put my feet on the floor before I picked her up. I felt like it was a lot of hype for nothing.

 

 

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astraia View Post

 

I would suggest putting an arm under your baby's head first (nestled in your upper arm area, ideally) with your hand wrapped around to the bum. Then you can move your arm around to help position, your arm gives the baby enough lift that it can meet up with your nipple at a straight-on angle, and your hand on the bum can pull them closer so they get a good angle- you want the head out further then the bum so the nose isn't jammed into your boob. This is what helped me, anyway! I spent awhile looking for a good picture, but everything I found has mom laying flat on the bed with baby flat on the bed and mom's arm underneath her own head. Totally not helpful, those are the diagrams and descriptions that made me want to throw things. Once I figured it out, I reduced the pillows slowly and could eventually do it without ever really waking up all the way (dream feeds are lovely for babies who seem like they never freaking sleep).

 

 

I've only ever nursed side-lying with my arm under my head! So funny what works for some and not others. I wonder if it has to do with breast size a bit? Mine are tiny, barely a B while nursing. I also couldn't figure it out until dd was a bit older - maybe it would have worked sooner if I had put her head on my arm! I love your description and I'm trying it with this baby!

post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruby2 View Post

but you can't nurse the baby in the mini cosleeper. The cosleeper mattress is about 4 inches lower than the lowest side of the frame. We had it set up so that the frame was even with our mattress, so the cosleeper mattress was lower than our mattress.It is essentially a bassinet that attaches flush to the bed. I had some swelling from the birth and couldn't reach over to get dd in or out and it was actually harder on my back than getting a baby out of a bassinet would have been because it was attached to the bed so I couldn't put my feet on the floor before I picked her up. I felt like it was a lot of hype for nothing.

 

I've heard this same thing from a lot of people, actually! After I saw the lip on the side that sits flush to your bed, I couldn't tell the difference between a cosleeper and a pack n' play. I know if I couldn't physically slide that newborn closer to me, then being able to put my feet on the floor so I could pick the baby up made all the difference. Lifting an 8-10 lb baby while laying flat on your back is impossible, IMO, I've tried it and it would throw my back out.

Sidelying nursing- I was a DD for a little while once my milk came in, and no matter how I tried to get lined up it just wouldn't work. I could either roll forward so she could latch on, but then I'd smother her with my boob while I tried, or I could try to latch her on semi-sitting, but she'd lose it if I laid her down again. She needed that extra height from my arm (I guess you could try a pillow, too?) to latch and stay latched, and being able to snug her bum close to my belly made a huge difference in getting the right angle so her nose wasn't pressed into me and she could get a deep enough latch. I'm glad my description made sense, hopefully it helps!
 

 

  Return Home
  Back to Forum: May 2012 Birth Club
Mothering › Groups › May 2012 Birth Club › Discussions › sleeping arrangements?