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would you let your son drop out of school for a term to make decent money? - Page 2

post #21 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post

 His interests would be just as well served by a fairy godmother who waved her wand and produced a $4000 check.  



He would really like that, lol  goodvibes.gif

 

Do you really think a financial aide person would really care that it took more than 4 years to graduate?  (note to self:  look into it).  I know most Uni's here only look at the top 6 marks from grade 12…...

 

His marks are good (average 75%) but it is only his first year in school and he missed 3 weeks of school (due to a trip) so maybe his marks will go up and be good enough for a scholarship…I just don't know.  

post #22 of 31

I only know the US system. Taking more than 4 years to complete high school would be an issue for competitive college admissions here. In many school districts, taking three weeks off would have meant failing the semester and a 75% average would not be good. Canada is a different world. 

post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

 

whatnextmom - The program is for 15-24 yr olds.  The program stipulates it is not for students, but for those not currently in school. On the young end of the spectrum, I expect most will be high school drop outs; among the older ones, it might be people who have graduated but are having trouble finding work.  I do not think he will be unduly influenced by a roughish crowd (if indeed it is rough) but I don't think he will get much out of it either, except money. Maybe I just need to explore/suggest he explore other ways to make money.  

 



Well, then, his application to the program isn't based on honesty. He is enrolled in school, therefore he doesn't meet the qualifications for the program. Yes, he could drop out of school - but as he is applying he is taking classes. That just doesn't sit right with me, unless he is being completely honest about the fact that he is enrolled in classes, and would drop out if he is accepted (which would disqualify him it sounds like).

 

Also, I want to point out that $4,000 isn't exactly alot of money, and would hardly touch the cost of attending university. If he spends part of it on a laptop, that will cost at least $500 most likely, and depending on what he gets up to $1,500. Then he has between $2,500-3,500 left. IF he doesn't spend any, he will have the beginnings of saving for college - but it would hardly reduce the amount of loans and such that he would need to take out. But if he does spend it, then he's right where he is now, with more "stuff".

 

There are definitely other ways to make money, and he might be able to do some work from home (creating and selling things - woodworking for example) very part time, to supplement whatever he makes in the summers. But, like most people these days, he will probably graduate college with an s-load of debt (I'm saddled with quite a bit myself).

post #24 of 31

I'd say no, but not for the reasons other people have said. I don't think that taking a semester off would be that bad, especially for a child who's been homeschooled and sees education as more flexible anyway.

 

He would potentially be taking a spot from someone who needs the spot. If your son is compared to a teen who's disadvantaged, doesn't have educated parents or has dropped out of school, he is going to look better on paper and probably interview better. He's got a better shot at getting into the program than other kids.

 

BUT, he doesn't need the program like they do. It's unethical, IMO.

 

Now, part of my response is colored by 2 things:

1. My kids go to school where 80% of the families receive free and reduced lunch. My kids get Christmas presents donated to them by a local high school because many of the families truly cannot afford presents at Christmas. I feel horribly guilty for accepting them, but there's no gracious way to decline. I know how hard it is for some of these families to keep their kids in school.

 

2. I teach at an urban university where many of the students are first generation college students. The difference between students who have families who have gone to college and those who haven't is pretty big in ways that matter. Students whose parents are college educated come see their advisers, they know how to make requests for extensions, they can work the system. Those who don't are very much hit or miss. Some of them figure it out on their own. Some don't. The ones that don't aren't any less bright than the students whose families have college degrees, but they fail much more often. They need someone to teach them how the system works.

 

I see this program as teaching students how the system works. It's a bit disingenuous for a student whose family knows how the system works to take a place because earning $4,000 would be nice.

post #25 of 31

considering he just started conventional school and is doing well there and liking it, I'd say leave him in school.

post #26 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raksmama View Post

considering he just started conventional school and is doing well there and liking it, I'd say leave him in school.



That is where we are heading.

 

This whole thing, though, has been a bit of a wake-up call for me wrt teens, money and future expenses…..  I need to be more proactive with him on having discussions on how to build resumes, etc.    I do think the centre where the program is taking place offers free resume and interview workshops - so that is good.  

post #27 of 31

 

Late to the conversation, but I might have discussed some kind of flexible school scheduling with him. I don't think there is anything essentially wrong with taking a semester to do something else.  Plenty of students do overseas exchange trips for a semester. Since it's a 12-week program, it ends in May or June. If he left school for this semester, I would ask him to consider taking at least 1, and maybe 2, courses at summer school. It's would be as if he were taking an early summer break to work, but returning to school in July rather than September. I tend to agree with others, though, that he isn't really a candidate for this program. 

 

I hear you on the jobs and financing. DS likes the place he's been working (a community centre art gallery and workshop) for the past couple of years, but the hours aren't great. He talks about finding something better, but there isn't a lot of incentive when he's otherwise happy with the work and the people. 

 

Does his high school offer assistance and/or courses on employment and career planning and finance/business planning? A lot of them have pretty good resources now through the guidance office, and some even have courses for credit. 

 

 

post #28 of 31

I think at 16, he already has a job-- school.  Unless your family really needs the money, I don't see any other reason for him to quit this semester of school and pursue this job.  

 

Your perspective on flexible work/school schedules is interesting to me, and one that I have never considered.  And I can certainly see how that situation must play out in many families.  But I think what's optimal is to get your child to finish HS, perhaps while working at the same time, in order to save money for college.  

post #29 of 31


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaimom View Post

I think at 16, he already has a job-- school.  Unless your family really needs the money, I don't see any other reason for him to quit this semester of school and pursue this job.  

 

 

Once I felt as you do. I thought school was the most important priority for a child and nothing should interfere with attendance. I've adjusted my thinking and my view has broadened quite a bit. There are lots of great reasons for a student to get some work experience, and money is only one. Many teenagers are trying to sort out their place in the world and what kind of future they want to work toward. Education is the priority, but education can be pursued in all sorts of places and by all sorts of means. It can be very helpful to gain some experience in a setting other than traditional school, even if the opportunity isn't in the industry or kind of work that is the student's long term career goal.

 

For a couple of years, my dc attended a high school with a great work experience program. The high school prided itself on its academic standards and placed very high on standardized testing outcomes. The school also had a philosophy that students should be prepared for every aspect of life, not just studying. Therefore, every student in 10th grade had to find 2 placements - one in a community service/volunteer/public service organization and another in a typical employment situation. They spent the better part of a month in these placements. It was a valuable experience for them and opened a lot of eyes on the demands of the workplace, working with others to create a successful business, and serving a clientele. 

 

Some schools now incorporate co-op learning in their schedules, either in term blocks or on a weekly or monthly basis throughout the school year. If that kind of program isn't available but a student wants to pursue an opportunity to gain experience (and/or for financial reasons), then it should be open to them to cobble together their own program. A high school with a semester system lends itself very nicely to taking time for an alternate experience for a high school student - work or volunteer or travel. I think it would be an improvement if the school system was more integrated with community opportunities for learning. If such integration doesn't exist, a student who is inclined to create their own opportunities shouldn't be dissuaded because of a reflexive preference that all teenagers should be attending school. Rather, the adults who counsel them (parents, teachers, potential employers etc.), will provide the most help if they support the student to examine closely the opportunities and consider whether they are appropriate or not and any possible consequences. 

 

 

post #30 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaimom View Post

I think at 16, he already has a job-- school.  Unless your family really needs the money, I don't see any other reason for him to quit this semester of school and pursue this job.  

 

Your perspective on flexible work/school schedules is interesting to me, and one that I have never considered.  And I can certainly see how that situation must play out in many families.  But I think what's optimal is to get your child to finish HS, perhaps while working at the same time, in order to save money for college.  



No, we don't need the money. 

 

I would be reluctant to allow a child to drop out of school to pay for family needs - as I do not think that is their job.  It is the parents job to supply the family needs if at all possible.  If they wanted to work part time and give money to the family, that would be very noble,  but it is nothing I would put on them.

 

No, his desire to make money stemmed from wants and future wants as opposed to needs.  Computer, travel, university…...

 

DH and I graduated university in the mid 90's and it took us 10 years to climb out from the student debt.  It was a huge albatross around our necks, particularly in the early years.  If he were to do this (which he isn't) I would discuss (borderline insist) he put away 3/4 of the money for the future.  I would like to save my kids from the sort of debt I had.  We do have some savings for school, but they are no where near enough to cover University.

 

I know there is an odd contradiction in the above but I have a head cold, lol, so figuring it out might be tricky.

 

I do not doubt for one minute he would go back to school in the fall.  If I did I would never even consider it.

 

Our school does have a co-op class in grade 11 or 12, that may be a good way to gain work experience (and more in a chosen field) than the 12 week program.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by purslaine - 2/16/12 at 9:37am
post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

 

Our school does have a co-op class in grade 11 or 12, that may be a good way to gain work experience (and more in a chosen field) than the 12 week program.

 



Definitely a much better idea. Especially if it will give him insight into the career path that he thinks is the right one at this point (people's minds change all the time at this age - and thats perfectly find and normal), because after getting some experience in that field he may find that he is more or less interested.

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