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Mothering › Groups ›  April 2012 DDC › Discussions › At what point do you get concerned about baby being posterior?

At what point do you get concerned about baby being posterior?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I had an u/s today to check on a kidney problem that baby had on our anatomy scan.  (It looked much better btw, and they expect little to no issues!).....

 

But baby was posterior, which I suspected.  I am only 30w2d (due very end of April) but my last two came early.  Are they still shifting back and forth a lot at this point?  Baby is really low right now.

 

This being #4 you would think I would know more, lol.  But #1 I was 20 and didn't really know to worry....#2 was breech until 36 wks and flipped, so posterior was the least of my worries.  And #3 was low and I could feel her back/butt from like 32 weeks on, so I knew she was in a good spot. 

 

Anyone know if I should be encouraging baby to move around at this point?

post #2 of 13

Well, My baby has pretty much been completely posterior the whole time. Head down but still facing forward. I just asked my OB about it last wek and he didn't even eant to palpitate long enough to be sure. He said that as long as baby is head down, he doesn't care about anything else. The problem is that I care.  My mom had one posterior presentation out of 6 and it was her only epidural. I've heard form others how painful it was too. I'm trying not to dwell on it but I have a cousin who practices cranial sacral therapy and she said that as I get closer, she can try and help me encourage this babe into a better postiion. We'll see.

 

 

post #3 of 13
HANDS AND KNEES!! I would try to get into a hands and knees position as much as possible. Scrub the floors everyday, lean over the garden, etc. Have your hubby use a scarf, like a rebozo, and try to jiggle the baby down into an anterior position(scarf cups belly while in H & K position and partner lifts his hands an inch or two back and forth so your belly jiggles), keep your tummy warm(babe will move posterior if belly is cold), homeopathic Kali Karbonicum for back pain associated with OP babes(for labour-just in case), no reclining, see a chiro- could be pelvic issues causing OP. If labour starts and babe is OP- hands and knees or even better, knee chest position. Have your hubby use the scarf to jiggle baby into the front, climb stairs 2 at a time- helps move baby's head, during a cx place one foot up on a chair and squat into the chair.

My second was totally OP through labour and birth(he was also a face presentation) and yes...for me, it hurt like someone was putting a knife in my lower back and twisting greensad.gif I never want to go through that again. I had him at home, but I can see the allure of getting pain meds with an OP baby...the thing is, that's the worst possible thing to do, with an OP baby:( That and getting your water broken. As soon as Mama is confined to bed with an epi. or baby is engaged and low with no water around them, it's really difficult for them to rotate.
post #4 of 13
I just noticed that you are 30w smile.gif I would worry more closer to 35+ weeks:)
post #5 of 13

Yeah, what Tulafina said about not worrying at 30 wk (and all the other things to keep in mind to try later on).  At least for me, my midwives could have cared less that baby was head up at 30-31 wks.  She had moved into LOA by 33 wks and doesn't seem to have moved around since then (I'll be 35 in a couple days).  I went swimming but other than that, I didn't 'do' anything, inversion wise or whatever to try and get her to move and I didn't really notice a whole lot of movement in general...amazing how she could move completely around and I wouldn't even notice!  Well, I did 'talk' to her and told her I'd just love it if she got in a good position in time for labor/delivery ;-)  Hope she's staying put!!

post #6 of 13

Dechri - I am so glad that you posted this and that Tula replied with all of her techniques. I will be 34 weeks this Saturday so I will be applying them to see if I can get this baby to rotate.

 

Rasa - I will be talking lots to baby. My mom said that her posterior labor was THE WORST pain that she has ever felt, Her doctor was too lazy to come in to rotate the baby while she was in labor.

post #7 of 13

Well not to spread fear but what Tula said is exactly what happened with my first babe.  ROP presentation, excrutiating back labor for more than a day, water broke...once that happened it seemed there was really no chance of her turning.  My midwife tried to turn her forever but I think it was too late.

 

So this time babe is LOP, I think.  Slightly better chances of rotating OA per spinning babies, but I'm still concerned.  My chiro does some cranial sacral stuff, so I'm hoping that, combined with good maternal positioning, inversions, and pelvic tilts, etc., will allow her to settle down nicely.  But really, start learning about positioning now and practice a bit, but don't get concerned until later, like everyone said!

post #8 of 13

It's never to early to be concerned and be proactive! At 30 weeks nothing is set in stone, but you  may be encouraging a posterior baby without realizing it or missing opportunities to encourage a more favorable position.

 

If you have not been there, go to spinningbabies.com and read up.

 

#1 was a posterior baby. # days of horrible back labor! i do not ever want to do that again. It was my first and I didn't know how much my daily activities and resting positions could make a difference.

 

#2 was almost a face presentation. I was able to get him to move and tuck his chin allowing me to have a wonderful, straight forward labor.

 

I'm 31 weeks now and babe keeps turning breech and posterior. I'm doing daily exercises and find the baby is more than willing to turn head down and anterior, he/she is just not read to stay there yet (although every day babe is spending more and more time in a great position.) I want to keep encouraging the position while movement is easy for us both.

post #9 of 13

How'd you get #2 to tuck his chin?

 

My midwife starts checking for position around 32 weeks. Since my last baby was a c-section for an OP face/brow presentation (doctor says face, I reached in and felt forehead) I've been concerned since day 1. I'm 34 weeks now and both my midwife and chiro are concerned about baby's position, probably due ot my history. Baby is currently ROT or ROA (not sure which) with his head tilted slightly off to the right.

post #10 of 13

I just wanted to say that my understanding (from spinning babies and other sources) is that most posterior babies rotate to anterior just before or during labor in any case, and many women don't have the horrible back labor associated with OP even if the baby doesn't turn 'in time'. So it doesn't necessarily mean you need to worry about it. Stressing too much will just increase the tension in your body.

 

That being said I'm sure it doesn't hurt to practice good posture while sitting and try to get in hands/knees position every day, and just generally maintain flexibility in the pelvis/hips. I spent some time on hands/knees while gardening yesterday and it felt like my baby turned a bit later on (I could feel a definite back or butt on the right front side). I think she/he may have gone back to posterior, but I'm only 31 weeks and I'm not worried about the position at this point.

post #11 of 13
I've been told that as long as the head is not engaged in the pelvis you can still rotate them. Get down in polar bear position with chest down, butt up in the air and stay there until he flips, usually within ten minutes. Then move to all fours which will bring him lower down in your pelvis, hopefully staying where you put him.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicMom View Post

I've been told that as long as the head is not engaged in the pelvis you can still rotate them. Get down in polar bear position with chest down, butt up in the air and stay there until he flips, usually within ten minutes. Then move to all fours which will bring him lower down in your pelvis, hopefully staying where you put him.

That may be true for some women but others, not so much greensad.gif 2 of my kiddos engaged at 36w, while my OP baby didn't until I started pushing. This is why it's important to always be aware of your position:) No reclining, laying on back, etc. My OP baby turned very easily in labour but when I stood up to go pee, at 9cm dilated, he turned back to back again:( It's important to remember too, that be it OP, breech, etc...babies are smart and no matter how hard you try to change their position, they will still choose the position that's best for them:) I just prefer good ole OA!!

Oh and yes- some women have no more pain with an OP baby than an OA baby, but in my experience, not very often. Especially precipitous labours. My OP/face baby was born after 1.5hrs and just 2 pushes, which isn't a normal occurrence...which would increase the pain.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Wow, thanks for the replies!  My 2nd was breech until late, so I got to know spinningbabies.com well!  I am doing weekly chiro now, so on top of that.  I will hit all fours and see if I can encourage baby.  Her head is super low now, but she does seem to move up for a bit, then settles way down again.  In hind sight, baby #1 I think may have been posterior for part of labor.  She came out in the right position, but I had a couple hours of excruiating back and tail bone pain that was nothing like I experienced in labor with #2 or 3.

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