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Delayed cord clamping -- how long?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
My OB/GYN has apparently NEVER had someone ask him to do delayed cord clamping! We talked about it at my visit this week, and he is more than willing to do it "if I think it's beneficial" (apparently he doesn't or doesn't know enough about it to have an opinion), but he wants to know how long I want it delayed. What is the norm here? I'm seeing two minutes and three minutes. I'm probably not going to get any longer than five minutes or so in the hospital setting, especially since he never does this, so I don't want to be too radical, lol. What would you recommend?
post #2 of 12

I read that you should wait until the cord stops pulsing. Time goes by so quickly after the birth, it didn't seem like it was a long time before they cut the cord with my last birth. Maybe your ob would be interested in this

http://academicobgyn.com/2011/01/30/delayed-cord-clamping-grand-rounds/

post #3 of 12

You need to wait until it stops pulsing at the very least. This usually takes at least 15min. Anytime before that and you run the risk of giving baby too much blood or too little. I wait until the cord is totally limp and white, that usually occurs by 30-45mins and is what most homebirthers and midwives go for. If he plans to let the baby lie on your chest with skin to skin contact immediately after the baby is born there is no reason why the cord needs to be cut. The baby and placenta are still transferring blood even if the placenta is out so even if he forces the third stage quickly there is still good reason to leave the cord alone. 
LOL, I just linked the same think as tri31 before I realized it :-P 

post #4 of 12

i will be waiting until after the placenta is born.

post #5 of 12

We usually waited until the placenta was out.  The cord will turn white when it is finished with the transfusion. 

 

5 min. is better than immediate cord clamping, though.

post #6 of 12

We waited until I was about to push the placenta out, which was 20 min for me.   The cord was white and "shriveled" by then.  No doubt that it was done.  This was a hospital birth with an OB.  We'd talked about delayed clamping ahead of time and he asked if we were ready to clamp after a couple minutes, but I asked to wait longer and he had no problems with it.  Delayed clamping is evidence based, but most of the published articles reference a 2-3min wait rather than longer, so allopathic practitioners are often ready after those few minutes.

post #7 of 12
Quote:
 I'm probably not going to get any longer than five minutes or so in the hospital setting, especially since he never does this, so I don't want to be too radical, lol. What would you recommend?


If you want to wait longer, then I would INSIST that they make it happen. There is no reason why you shouldn't be able to wait as long as you want. There is tons of evidence to support delayed cord clamping! I wouldn't worry about being "radical" - OBs are often so behind on evidence based stuff like this, it blows my mind!

 

post #8 of 12
We stopped after a few minutes because the cord was really short and my daughter couldn't reach my breast to nurse. This was a homebirth. Otherwise we would wait quite a bit longer, I'd think.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicole730 View Post

We stopped after a few minutes because the cord was really short and my daughter couldn't reach my breast to nurse. This was a homebirth. Otherwise we would wait quite a bit longer, I'd think.


That happened to us too, ds' cord was really short and they couldn't get him onto my chest.  I'm hoping that doesn't happen again. 

 

I think everything in a birth plan bears the disclaimer "to the extent possible," you know? I haven't dug out my old one to redo, but I know I had something like that at the beginning to acknowledge that I understood it was guidance for ideal circumstances, which might or might not happen.  So for cutting the cord I'm probably going to put "until it stops pulsating" and see how it goes.

 

I'm shocked that your OB has never heard of it. I might print out a study and bring it to an appointment to give to him "just in case he is interested."  Just for some perspective, I had it in my birth plans 8 and 10 years ago and no one batted an eye.

post #10 of 12

Love love love the link posted earlier! I managed to watch the whole thing over the course of a few days and found it very informative. Great to know that there is some evidence also that preemies benefit even more to delayed clamping!

 

 

post #11 of 12

I've read up a bit since posting last on this topic and am more and more impressed with the benefits of waiting to clamp the cord until it has stopped pulsing and is flat.

 

The birth center I am having my birth at (for the 3rd time) is run by CNMWs and so while there is flexibility, etc. they have some protocols that I want to opt out on and found that it is important to really specify in my birth plan.

 

Keeping this in mind, one required test they do is for Cord Blood. This might be an ignorant Q (!), but let's say we clamp the cord at 30 minutes, can they still get blood from the cord for their testing? The way it was described to me is that they draw blood from the cord "right after the baby is born".

 

I have an apt. coming up soon, so just doing my research!

post #12 of 12

With delayed clamping, there was still just enough cord blood for blood typing with my DS.  Nurse said it was just barely enough, but it was there.  And that was with fairly significant delayed clamping--not clamped until right before I passed the placenta.

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