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Frustrated with Curriculum Choices! Advice?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm hoping someone can give me advice about which curriculum is right for my family.  I have been reading about Waldorf education and gathering resources over the past year.  I've read quite a bit... I have a shelf full of books... I understand that I *can* assemble a curriculum myself... but after a year trying to pull things together, not getting anywhere and feeling overwhelmed, I just don't think the create-your-own route is going to work for me.  So I think I need a complete ready-made kindy and 1st grade curriculum that's easy to follow, structured, spoon-fed, everything in one place.  Does such a curriculum exist?
 
I have a small collection of Waldorf children's books, Seven Times the Sun, Sing a Song of Seasons, and the 4 Seasons of Joy to work with.  I have several Little Garden Flower books and Path of Discovery Grade 1, but they leave a LOT that needs adding in, I think.  I have the Christopherus 1st grade books, but it seems like this is still a lot of work to pull all the books together into something I can follow day-to-day.  I've heard good things about Enki, Live-Ed and Earthschool, but haven't looked at any materials yet.  Oak Meadow, I've heard begins academics too early for true Waldorf, but can you leave out the early academics or would this make the curriculum pointless, I wonder.  It's too expensive to buy all these materials when I'm not sure if they're even going to be useful!
 
More about us: 
1. I have a 4 year old daughter, and I am pregnant with child #2.  So during dd1's kindergarten/1st grade years, I will have a wee one.  We'll also be doing major home renovation during this time.  I doubt I'll have much time for curriculum shopping/planning once the baby comes!
2. I'm very detail-oriented and like to have things planned well in advance... winging it or pulling something together last minute sends me over the edge. 
3. We live too far away from a Waldorf school for that to be an option.
4. We are not Christian and would prefer a curriculum that has a more balanced multicultural/faith approach without being overloaded with Christian elements.
 

Sorry for such a long post... I'm frustrated with myself for not having this "figured out" by now, and I think my pregnancy anxiety is getting to me!  I appreciate any help.

post #2 of 19

I was originally planning on using Oak Meadow and making it my own, but we're at a Waldorf school now. Anyway, I'd have to look over the Oak Meadow books I have, but you might be able to use it just delay the grade. Does that make sense? You could use the Oak Meadow Kindergarten for 1st grade.... just a thought. Good luck!

post #3 of 19

I haven't used it, but families in our Waldorf homeschool co-op use LiveEd! and love it.

 

I'd urge you to push your comfort boundaries a little for the next few years of Kindy.  You have some great resources there and keeping it simple in Kindy is really the best route.  Bringing together your own program for those years is pretty easy and rewarding.  But if that's too much, have you looked at A Little Acorn Learning?  That's pretty comprehensive for Kindy.

 

I wouldn't worry about Grade One just yet.  You have more than two years, right?!  So much can change in that time.  Maybe spend the next year researching...go to a curriculum fair with a co-op group, maybe?  Something is sure top speak to you in that time.

 

I felt like you do now a few years ago.  Now that I'm halfway through my oldest's Grade One year, I feel a lot more like I know what will work for us.  I'm mostly finished planning for next year already and it was a lot less work than last year's prep was...it does get better!

 

Good luck.

post #4 of 19

I've looked at a LOT of curriculum. Oak meadow might be perfect for you. Now given it's not strictly Waldorf but it has a good Waldorf flavor and you can make it more waldorfy' if you want to by using the fantastic books you already own.

It gives YOU a good clear guide line of what to do each week but isn't so structured you can't wiggle it around.

 

Now for your wee one littleacornlearning.com is AWESOME. very Waldorf and fun and totally workable into Oak meadow as well so everybody can do school together. :)

 

http://www.christopherushomeschool.com is also good but not as structured as oak meadow.

 

http://thebearthinstitute.memberlodge.com  is probably not as structured as you want but they do have some good enrichment class extras... like herbalist, woodworking, & knitting for kids. they also have a really good deal to buy packages of creative HS supplies.

post #5 of 19

We have a 6 year old dd right now and will have a newborn when she's in grade 1 in the fall.  I'm looking at these things: http://www.mothering.com/community/t/1346568/looking-to-next-year#post_16901041.  I really like to assemble my own curriculum so I'll be adapting our Little Acorn Learning kindy circle to fit better with grade 1.  We will not be doing weekly lesson blocks (Waldorf-style) but will do 1 subject with 1 handwork per day along with circle (but we'll repeat subjects within the week).  Both Oak Meadow, Enki, and Earthschooling have pieces that you can buy separate from a full curriculum, which is nice if you want to adapt Waldorf.  If you want a day-by-day layout, Oak Meadow and Christopherus are your best bets, but with Christopherus the pictures are not color and you must buy the full curriculum.  Given your info, if I had to pick, I'd say look at Oak Meadow.  It seems the easiest to implement and the best fit for what you're looking for.  Live Ed grade 1 I looked at and sold--way too expensive and not enough guidance.  Enki seems a little overwhelming to me, though many love it.

post #6 of 19

We are secular - Enki is the best fit for us. I love it. There are a lot of binders and it can seem overwhelming. But, baby steps are really helpful. I've been using it since my son was 4. We are entering 3rd grade now. Our age spread is kind of close. My oldest is 3.75 years older than his brother. 

 

But Enki is not Waldorf. It is very Waldorf - I've read fairy tales, we introduce letters the same way. But it does include components of Montessori and regular schooly stuff. Enki is what you make of it. Plus it's multicultural - which is really important to me.

 

It is a lot of work. I have to know my child and chose what stories will speak to him. Which requires reading the stories and sleeping on them - or meditating on them. This doesn't really start until first grade though. And this flexibility of curriculum is one of the most important aspects of the curriculum to me. If one "M" story doesn't work for me - I need to have 2 more to look through for a better fit. 

 

My friend uses Live Ed - which she loves. LOVES. And she's been doing it for the same amount of time I've been doing Enki. I think that each letter has one story associated with it. It is a traditional Waldorf curriculum - so she has added in singapore math now that her son is older. I think that maybe her introduction to numbers stories were cuter. We used fairy tales. But our four process stories really spoke to my son and he loves the characters  and identifies with them.

 

I've looked at Christopherous first, but it is too rigid for me. One story per letter is not enough.

 

A Little Garden Flower is inexpensive and I think it covers everything. It's really cheap and so it's low risk anyway if I am wrong. It just wasn't flexible enough for me, same thing about the one story per letter. 

 

I know that you feel pressured right now to figure everything out. Especially with a new baby on the way. My youngest son, being 4 right now, has gotten almost nothing this year. Well, except that he has the benefit of an established rhythm to fall into. But it's OK. He plays a lot and at 4 almost 5 years old - that's wonderful. He has an older brother to learn things from that an older brother teaches. 

 

Your daughter is going to have the benefit of learning things from a younger sibling. Not in the same way, but it is still valuable. How to have patience, how to be gentile. To find joy in simple things like fingers. The importance of breastfeeding! Wow! I wish my youngest could learn that through example. Compassion. She will get to relive being young as she gets older and hold on to her childhood longer. As they get older, she will get to be the big girl, sharing and teaching her sister things. So, even if the next year is topsy turvey, it will still be wonderful!

 

I hope this helps! 

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies and suggestions!  It sounds like Oak Meadow is probably the most structured, so I will definitely look more into that.  How is it as far as being multicultural? 

 

I've heard good things about LiveEd too, but so many people have said it has less structure than Christopherus, so that's turnoff for me.  I have the Christopherus Syllabus and even though it does have a really helpful layout and weekly structure pages, it still looks like a lot of work for me to pull things from each of the other books.  Maybe I'm wrong about this?  I also worry about going with the purely waldorf approach since it seems like unless I do a lot of modification, the predominance of Christian exposure (saints, festivals, Old Testament block etc) will be too much for me.

 

I have thought about doing Little Acorn Learning for the 4-5yo kindy year, and then use something else after that... but they are only early ed.  I'm looking at the kindy years as a trial curriculum for when we get to the grades.  My hope is that I can just pick something now for kindy/first, I'll love it, and I can stick with it for the next few years without having to search through all the curricula again to find something else.  I really just want to get going with something and get into a groove. 

 

numericmama, thanks for the encouraging words, especially about my dd having a sibling to learn from!  I have been looking more and more into Enki too, since I really like that it has a more multicultural approach.  But I'm nervous that people say there's a lot of "stuff" and not a lot of structure... how do people pull it all together into something usable?  And I hate that it costs so much with no real way for me to preview it first... I looked on the yahoo group list and there's no one near me with it.  At $500 for the kindy package and a 15% return fee plus shipping, I would probably be out ~$100 if I decide not to use it... and I couldn't even resell it because of their purchase policy!  The website and yahoo group has a lot of info, but it seems to say a lot about the curriculum approach, without saying much about the details, structure, actual content.  I don't know... in trying to plan things myself, I really need to see what a daily, weekly, yearly schedule would look like and what topics are covered when before I commit my entire homeschool budget to buy.

post #8 of 19

I had a Friend who used Enki so I borrowed it to look thorough but... it sounds like you are like me. I don't mind my kids being unstructured and enjoying the love of learning but I Need someone to tell me the basics of what to do everyday and from there I can reorganize or add and subtract if I need to.

 Enki is fantastic for inspiration and pulling beautiful things from but it has no structure at all. You decide what to teach and when and pull from the sources the information to do it.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxravnos View Post

I had a Friend who used Enki so I borrowed it to look thorough but... it sounds like you are like me. I don't mind my kids being unstructured and enjoying the love of learning but I Need someone to tell me the basics of what to do everyday and from there I can reorganize or add and subtract if I need to.

 Enki is fantastic for inspiration and pulling beautiful things from but it has no structure at all. You decide what to teach and when and pull from the sources the information to do it.


Oof, that sound like exactly what I don't want!  A lot of overwhelming resource material with no structure.  That's too bad... why do all these high-dollar curricula not have structure?  I totally agree with you... I want things to be spontaneous, flexible, and adaptable to my child, but I'm just not relaxed enough to create that unless I have a good plan to start with, lol.  I read somewhere that Enki had recently started including something in their materials that helped organize things, but haven't been able to find out what that is or what it looks like. 

post #10 of 19

 

Just curious onyxravnos, but did you look at K or 1st? In K, there is a philosophy of how the day and week should look, but other than that - yes you put it together. 

 

But in First and now Second I have a "school year" calendar that gives an overveiw of what to cover each in which block and what should be sleep and what should be reawoken with which types of practice ideas. So, I pull that out and put it on my top binder to guide my planning.

 

More detail is listed out in the teacher's binder and then often in the part of the individual binder for that block. But I've been doing it for a while, so I know where to look. I remember when I had the Kindergarten curriculum and I looked at someone else's first grade - I was blown away by how much information there was and how much I was going to have to teach as a first timer with someone that age. I didn't really know where to start. But I only had the info for two hours. Once I had my own, I could take my books with me to the beach or whatever. I still tend to lack planning and organization though, so I have really leaned on that calendar schedule. 

 

 

 

 

post #11 of 19
I've put together my own for Kindy, used Christopherus for first, Enki for 2nd and now Enki for Kindy round 2 and first with my second DS. i also bought Live Ed for first but didn't end up using it much. In all, I would truly recommend going for Enki for one Grades year, first grade for you. You'll learn SO much, have all the resources in one place (so no running to the library when your reserve comes in with a new baby and Kinder), and it's very thorough. The packages also come with a very detailed structure and starting up plan.

The stories are unlike any other. They are SO so so good. They meet your child where they are developmentally. Enki is wonderful, in my opinion.

That said, I've learned so much using it for grade 2 and Kindy that I will be pulling together my own resources next year for third. It was like Waldorf/Montessori teacher training for homeschoolers, in my opinion.

I loved it, and found the experience very valuable. My boys both loved it too.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by briansmama View Post

I've put together my own for Kindy, used Christopherus for first, Enki for 2nd and now Enki for Kindy round 2 and first with my second DS. i also bought Live Ed for first but didn't end up using it much. In all, I would truly recommend going for Enki for one Grades year, first grade for you. You'll learn SO much, have all the resources in one place (so no running to the library when your reserve comes in with a new baby and Kinder), and it's very thorough. The packages also come with a very detailed structure and starting up plan.
The stories are unlike any other. They are SO so so good. They meet your child where they are developmentally. Enki is wonderful, in my opinion.
That said, I've learned so much using it for grade 2 and Kindy that I will be pulling together my own resources next year for third. It was like Waldorf/Montessori teacher training for homeschoolers, in my opinion.
I loved it, and found the experience very valuable. My boys both loved it too.


It's funny how different opinions can be--we have the full set of fairy/nature/fable tales from Enki for kindy and I find them very boring and they do not meet my child's emotional needs.  I got them used and I'm glad I did because I would have been really ticked.  So many people love Enki, though ... I just guess it doesn't fit for us.  I think they have samples on their website if that helps.

post #13 of 19

I have a few extra minutes and wanted to give you a quick run-down on all Waldorf curricula I've looked at:

 

ALGF:  inexpensive but most of the book is devoted to what Waldorf is, who Steiner is, what rhythm is.  The second half of the book has stories and a day-by-day layout, but essentially it's Grimms fairy tales along with a few other books you have to buy.  The hidden letter drawings are simple and black-and-white, and there is very little discussion of wet-on-wet or form drawing, if that matters to you.

 

OM:  Full color pictures.  You can buy their letter pictures and fairy tale book separately for $30, which is what I'm doing.  In their curriculum, they have a weekly layout, which is an element I like because daily schedules make me feel like I have to do what they say when they say, whereas weekly gives more flexibility while providing structure.  If I weren't making my own curriculum, I'd definitely buy the full OM grade 1 set.  I love that I won't have to draw on a blackboard (with a newborn, I'm just not going to have time!) but can open up a book and have beautiful pictures to copy. They also have both upper case and lower case letters as well as word families.  Their math stories look good too, but they do not do archetypes of numbers (this is in their kindy book).  

 

Live Ed:  Beautifully illustrated but very airy-fairy.  Archetypes of numbers, for instance, is mentioned only briefly with a few examples but an entire paragraph is given to contemplating the wonder of paper!  Their alphabet stories are the same pictures as the book LMNOP (by the same authors) and a listing of possible Grimms stories which don't really match the pictures given.  No schedule is given just a listing of blocks with vague ideas on how to teach them.  According to their copyright, you cannot resell.

 

Enki:  Lots of 3-ring binders filled with materials you pick and choose from.  From the look of their website you can order some things separately, such as grade 1 fairy tales that has black and white drawings for the hidden letters.  The downsides are that this is very expensive and you are not supposed to resell it.  It also has a re-stocking fee if you order and then return.  Beth's stories are her own, so you won't find them anywhere else.  The rest of the material you can adapt from other sources, such as Brain Gym and various folk song collections.  As far as Waldorf math goes (which we will not be doing), I like Enki's best.

 

Earthschooling:  Various e-books that you can download.  Her math stories and painting stories are very good.  I was less impressed with her alphabet book, which doesn't include drawings at all but tells you have your child draw the letters and then turn them into something else.  I've also had trouble finding her e-books online at times but that may be fixed now.  Her e-books are very inexpensive but you have to do all the daily planning yourself.

 

Christopherus:  Donna Simmons grates on my nerves.  I have many books by her at this point and she always comes across as dogmatic and rigid, which is the thing I like least about any Waldorf purist standpoint.  With that said, her grade 1 looks good on her website, but there are no color pictures and the drawings are simplistic (this is a downside for us because I don't want to draw on a chalkboard to make them colorful).  Also, you cannot buy any parts separately other than her movement books, form drawing, and modeling books.  If you want a full curriculum with a day-by-day guide, I know a lot of people like Christopherus.

 

Best wishes!

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by numericmama View Post
But in First and now Second I have a "school year" calendar that gives an overveiw of what to cover each in which block and what should be sleep and what should be reawoken with which types of practice ideas. So, I pull that out and put it on my top binder to guide my planning.

 

More detail is listed out in the teacher's binder and then often in the part of the individual binder for that block. But I've been doing it for a while, so I know where to look. I remember when I had the Kindergarten curriculum and I looked at someone else's first grade - I was blown away by how much information there was and how much I was going to have to teach as a first timer with someone that age. I didn't really know where to start. But I only had the info for two hours. Once I had my own, I could take my books with me to the beach or whatever. I still tend to lack planning and organization though, so I have really leaned on that calendar schedule. 

 

Thanks numericmama... that's the most description of Enki structure I've been able to find anywhere!  Two questions:

1. Can you guess at how much time you had to put in upfront to read through the materials and put something together just to get started?  And then about how much time do you need for routine planning, like each week/month/etc?

2. HOW CAN I GET A LOOK AT THAT CALENDAR SCHEDULE WITHOUT BUYING THE WHOLE PACKAGE??  Is it just a few pages?  Is it online anywhere?  I feel like the structure piece is going to be the deciding factor about whether I go with Enki, and I'm really sick of the money I've spent already on these resources only to find I have no idea how to implement them.  More importantly, my husband is not on-board with me spending that much money on something else unless I can practically GUARANTEE I will stick with it... something silly about "responsible money management" or something like that... I totally don't get it, lol. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LuxPerpetua View Post

I have a few extra minutes and wanted to give you a quick run-down on all Waldorf curricula I've looked at:


Thanks so much for these reviews, LuxPerpetua!  I'd be really interested in seeing how you end up piecing together your own 1st grade curriculum from the different materials... your post on the other thread was really helpful.  Are you going to blog about it?  I'm amazed at some of the diverse and holistic things that some diy-ers are able to include when they take the time to put their own materials together... so awesome... but completely intimidating if I think about trying it myself, lol!

:)

 

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

So I'm curious... for those of you who've used Enki and Christopherus, would it be possible to use the calendar layout/guide from Christopherus and just insert the Enki material into it instead of the Christopherus stuff? 

post #16 of 19

1. Can you guess at how much time you had to put in upfront to read through the materials and put something together just to get started?  And then about how much time do you need for routine planning, like each week/month/etc.

 

Just to get started didn't take me very long. Mostly because I was already familiar with the Waldorf way of doing things. That is what my friends were doing so it was pretty easy to learn from them. You have to pick your circle songs, and learn them but you would have to do with anything. When you read fairy tales, there is work that you really "should" put in first. The goal would be to read it 3 times to yourself and visualize the story before bringing it to your child. I can't say that I did that very often.  ;)  Not until older K and first grade. I think this is basic Waldorf philosophy though (or easier). My girlfriend wen through Waldorf training and she won't read them to her children. She has to get to know the story enough that she tells it. I guess this helps her to gauge what her children are responding to and since she is telling it - she is bringing more of her viewpoint in the story to her children. And is more present. With Folk Tales, I picked and read the story to myself the night before and that was it. And sometimes I would make the Folk tale into a puppet show for the kids - but again, you would do that with any curriculum if you were making a puppet show. 

 

For the circle, I started out slowly. Using a couple songs and adding to it. 

 

For my annual planning. I seriously cart the manuals around with me and read them when I have time. Or little bits here and there when I want to have a cup of coffee. And, I re-read them when I feel like I need a refresher. I tend to need to read things through once. Sleep on it. Read it again. Sleep on it and then read it a third time. I've always been this way. 

 

The binders - I read through once superficially in the summer. But I go back again before the appropriate block.

 

For my weekly planning. I am basically just staying ahead. So, I don't spend the time planning that others say they do. Melissa from a "Little Garden Flower" says to set aside a couple hours a week (like on Sunday). I can't really do that consistently. So I just stay ahead. I also have a girl friend who writes up her entire annual plan, including picking out stories, associated crafts and movement at the beginning of the year. She spends an intensive week on this. Then she spends two hours a week planning. I do not do this. I find that what I expect to happen tends not to. Maybe I think a story will be good for January at the beginning of the year - but when we reach January my son is in a completely different place. 

 

There is a cost to my lack of planning. Sometimes I don't have the supplies I need for the craft I want to do. :(   

 

I am doing more planning now because the stories are more intense. We are in second grade and the sage stories can bring up feelings for me. It was not so great for me to be crying while reading a story to my son because of my own past experiences. So I start the math block on Monday (which I will plan on Sunday) and am focusing more on choosing and processing the next sage story. 

 

Caveat - this is just my way. Other people probably do things differently.

 

Re: Christopherous, I didn't look too closely because we can't use Grimm's stories. My son would have flipped out. Also, there is a Montessori component to Enki. I'm not sure how that would fit in. Your best bet about the calendar would be to ask at EnkiExperience@yahoogroups.com. Maybe someone else has used Christopherous and knows about the calendar. It doesn't work with the Little Garden Flower calendar. I wish you lived near me.

 

Best!

 

 

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

That is so helpful numericmama!  Thank you so much for taking the time to describe your planning process for me.  Gosh, I wish I lived near you!  I would be begging to come over to your house and come to "school", lol! 

 

All those materials to go through and lugging them to a coffee shop is giving me flashbacks of college... eek.  But I'm beginning to worry that I'm probably going to wind up putting that kind of time into whatever curriculum I wind up going with... I think I'll just NEED to read and re-read, modify, and add to.  So much work for 1 child... just for kindergarten, which is supposed to be mostly play, right?... and then every year of school after.  Oh my, what a commitment to homeschool!

post #18 of 19

No problem. This is my relaxed, in between blocks week. Next week I have to be more focused!

 

What you learn for child 1 will benefit child 2 as well!

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugz View Post

Quote:

 

Thanks so much for these reviews, LuxPerpetua!  I'd be really interested in seeing how you end up piecing together your own 1st grade curriculum from the different materials... your post on the other thread was really helpful.  Are you going to blog about it?  I'm amazed at some of the diverse and holistic things that some diy-ers are able to include when they take the time to put their own materials together... so awesome... but completely intimidating if I think about trying it myself, lol!

:)

 



Well, I'm essentially adding a main lesson component each day to our circle time.  We aren't doing Waldorf lesson blocks (like the weekly ones you hear about) but rather one lesson per day and one handwork, with lesson repeats during the week.  So, for example, language arts (fairy tales, intro to spelling and grammar) will be on Monday and Friday, Math on Tuesday and Thursday, and Nature on Wednesday.  We'll do our regular circle that we've been doing in kindy which focuses on the seasons with music and dance but at the end have a main lesson followed by handwork related to the main lesson.  So Monday, Letter Fairy Tale of the week followed by drawing (copying the hidden letter picture from our OM book) as well as some free drawing and practice writing letters; Tuesday, Miquon Math (which seems to pair really well with a Waldorf outlook) followed by the ThinkFun logic games we already do in kindy (like Rush Hour, Set, Shape-by-Shape, Chocolate Factory); Wednesday, Nature story from the Among the ... People series from Yesterday's Classics followed by a Cicely Mary Barker Flower Fairy poem using the letter of the week and song on the corresponding CD and then modeling the flowers with clay; Thursday, Noble Knights of Knowledge (a Waldorf-inspired math curriculum) followed by wet-on-wet painting that afternoon; and Friday, Spelling and Intro to Grammar lessons followed by random handwork (origami, embroidery, knitting, seasonal crafts) and breadmaking (I thought we'd make bread letters to eat for snack on Friday).  We are Waldorf-inspired so I really like finding materials that meet dd's needs.  Right now her penmanship is great and she can read but she needs help forming numbers and building up a sight-word vocabulary list and understanding some basic points of grammar to help her understand what she's reading, so that's what we're going to do.  Having a set circle routine in kindy has really made things easy for grade 1, actually, since I'm just changing out some of the material but not all of it.  Honestly, what I love about making my own curriculum is that it can really flexible and I don't feel like I have to do xyz by Friday because the list says I need to do that.  Looking at the samples online, I really like how OM does a weekly approach like this so you can do what you want when you want but with some structure behind it.  It's actually my favorite Waldorf-based curriculum so far, but I don't do well with rigidity at all.  I also like a lot of down-time for dd to just do whatever she wants, so 1-1.5 hours a day of circle/lesson is plenty for us.  I spend about 1 hour a week planning our kindy circle, but for grade 1, I'm not going to do much advance planning at all, and I'm going to read every fairy tale (rather than memorize them, like many Waldorfers).  With a newborn in the works, I have no issues freeing up my time because  that's important too.

 

One thought about Enki:  Could you buy the foundation guides and see if they speak to you?  That might be a good way to tell.  Also, there is a used Waldorf curriculum yahoo group that sells Enki along with every other Waldorf curriculum out there. Waldorf-family-supplies@yahoogroups.com .   

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