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Swedish photo project, "All I Own"

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I saw this on facebook and thought this was pretty amazing... if that's all you have, hard to get it all cluttery! Graned, I had a lot less crap when I was a student, when I didn't own a home, and didn't have a kid, but the simplicity here amazes and inspires me to keep pairing down!

 

http://inhabitat.com/all-i-own-swedish-students-photographed-with-all-their-possessions-show-how-to-live-with-less/

post #2 of 14

very neat, thanks for sharing this!

post #3 of 14

I LOVE this series!

 

I am a little jealous -- they probably have shared housing, so they don't own cooking stuff or kitchen table, etc etc. But it also inspires me to continue decluttering and getting rid of all my excess crap.

post #4 of 14

I don't mean to be a downer but I didn't find it inspiring. They don't take into account shared items and that's a cop out imo. Katie, as you said - you had a lot less when you were a student too. We all did, which is why it didn't really do anything for me. Now, if they had a family who could fit all their belongings into one photograph then I'd be amazed! thumb.gif orngbiggrin.gif

 

 

 

 

Yes I can, if I too took out all items that were in the 'shared' category such as kitchenware, common furniture etc.
 

If I had to name items that belonged solely to myself, they would be three pairs of shoes, 35 peices of clothing including underwear, 5 stuffed toys from childhood, 15 books, a laptop, pillow, car, wallet/keys, a couple of folders contaning documents.. That's it.

post #5 of 14

Those pictures seem about right for a college student -- bed, clothes, shoes, lots of books and a computer.  I think I lived with that much when I was in school, though I would have added a bicycle.  

 

The article mentions that this is the first generation in Sweden that is living less well off than the previous one.  When I lived in Sweden, this was often a topic of conversation with my Swedish friends.  They were struggling to understand and cope with this perceived "step down" in lifestyle.  Housing is crushingly expensive and there is a 30% tax on all consumer goods.  So, people live in small apartments with less stuff.  

 

I do think it is a bit funny reading about the students "anti-consumerist" lifestyles.  It is not so much a personal choice to be anti-consumerist, but more of a requirement in Sweden.  You just can't afford to buy much of anything.    

post #6 of 14

And I love Peter Menzel's photos of families around the world with their belongings.  

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/worldbalance/material.html

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthiegirl View Post

And I love Peter Menzel's photos of families around the world with their belongings.  

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/worldbalance/material.html



Yes!! I love this series. I think when I was in elementary school we had a book with all these photos. So neat.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthiegirl View Post

And I love Peter Menzel's photos of families around the world with their belongings.  

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/worldbalance/material.html



I think these pictures are much more telling regarding how many possessions someone living in a first world country has compared to a third world country.  Still, I found it a bit skewed.  Menzel put the US family in a cul-de-sac with their belongings spread out into room groupings, but the Japanese family who live in a similarly-sized home, have all their belongings crammed and piled so that it fits in the picture.  The author then says that the US family also has "x, y, and z" which it is implied don't "fit" into the picture.  Just something that I noticed that kind of bothered me...

 

Still, I'd love to see a minimalist family photo with possessions.  Especially if that family cooked regularly!  It seems like so many minimalists live in large cities and either eat out or shop often.  We live farther from town, and it is not convenient or environmentally conscious for us to run to the store for ingredients for every meal.

post #9 of 14

pff, not impressed.

Pretty easy to not own much when you're young childless, single, not responsible for others', dont have to worry about growing out of your clothes. My total possessions would be less than that, but  my home is full of stuff-KID stuff.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kt~mommy View Post

I saw this on facebook and thought this was pretty amazing... if that's all you have, hard to get it all cluttery! Graned, I had a lot less crap when I was a student, when I didn't own a home, and didn't have a kid, but the simplicity here amazes and inspires me to keep pairing down!

 

http://inhabitat.com/all-i-own-swedish-students-photographed-with-all-their-possessions-show-how-to-live-with-less/

Wait to those people have kids LOL! I have to say, though, that I have less shoes (that are mine) than the first guy. 

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthiegirl View Post

And I love Peter Menzel's photos of families around the world with their belongings.  

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/worldbalance/material.html

That is great--thanks for sharing.

post #12 of 14

When we moved from our last small home (700 sq ft) to our new 350 sq ft small cottage we had so much fun downsizing and only packing items we would need and actually use. So the photos of the Swedish students inspired me even more. We belong to the Small House Society and some families live in spaces even smaller than our place. Bear in mind most small places have very efficient storage, built in beds etc. Think IKEA.

 

We have a French armoire for clothes which means we are Audrey Hepburn minded in only owning classic clothes that don't do out of style and clothes we actually will wear. And in the kitchen we have everything we need to make awesome healthy meals. No tv, one laptop, no video fact parents at many of the Silicon Valley high tech companies either homeschool or us private schools that discourage watching tv and even using a computer. Never have allowed a lot of childrens clothes or toys. Books yes.  Also recommend a toy lending library.

post #13 of 14

For those interested YouTube has some wonderful videos like We The Tiny House People  and my favorite California DIY, shipping container tiny home and a cargo trailer bedroom , which is about Lulu who built her own small home, for herself and her children. No its not for everyone, buy hey I live in rural California where less is more and where small homes are popular. And its so freeing to have less 'stuff'.

post #14 of 14

I like the cat!!! : ) cat.gif

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