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Baby Led Weaning - Starting Solids - Page 10

post #181 of 256

Nicole!!  Awesome to hear from you!  Please post some more pictures of your adorable twins!

post #182 of 256

thanks Jaimee! I have a little more free time since I decreased my work at home job hours some.I have to download pics from our computer and will post. They are growing up so fast and so far all on breast milk which still amazes me that our bodies can make milk for 2 babies.

Here is a recipe I just found on mercolas web site

Egg Yolk for Baby

Egg yolk should be baby's first solid food, starting at 4 months, whether baby is breastfed or formula-fed. Egg yolks from pastured hens will contain the special long-chain fatty acids so critical for the optimal development of the brain and nervous system.

The whites may cause an allergic reaction and should not be given to baby until he is at least one year old

  • 1 organic egg from a pasture-fed hen
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated raw organic liver, frozen for 14 days (optional)
  • pinch seasalt

Boil egg for 3 1/2 minutes. Place in a bowl and peel off shell. Remove egg white and discard. Yolk should be soft and warm, not hot, with its enzyme content intact. Sprinkle with salt.

post #183 of 256

My friend's recipe for gluten-free pancakes:

 

http://www.theparentvortex.com/wordpress/gluten-free-pancakes/

post #184 of 256
I'm quite confused as to what is okay for babies to eat now. Some places say yogurt and cheese are okay, but others say dairy before a year is linked to diabetes. So dairy or no dairy? Also, what about wheat? I've read no wheat until one year, but lots of people give wheat. Is it the gluten? I'm lost!

We have no food allergies in our family. I had issues tolerating lactose when I was younger (still do a bit) and so did dd2.

I'd like to give Jasper some kind of bread/ pita/ bagel, but everything is wheat.
post #185 of 256

We are holding off on gluten/wheat until at least 7 months.  I gave my older son yogurt around 8-9 months but we are vegan now.  I also don't salt his food.  I do like to experiment with herbs, though I haven't yet since he was a little late to come around to eating at all :-)

post #186 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkToMeNow View Post

I'm quite confused as to what is okay for babies to eat now. Some places say yogurt and cheese are okay, but others say dairy before a year is linked to diabetes. So dairy or no dairy? Also, what about wheat? I've read no wheat until one year, but lots of people give wheat. Is it the gluten? I'm lost!
We have no food allergies in our family. I had issues tolerating lactose when I was younger (still do a bit) and so did dd2.
I'd like to give Jasper some kind of bread/ pita/ bagel, but everything is wheat.

 

I'm totally confused too. 

post #187 of 256

The nutritionist I spoke to for DD said that the new research is recommending not holding off on high-allergen (like dairy, wheat etc) foods until a year any more, but introducing them in small quantities from the beginning. As long as there isn't a family history of food allergies, that is. For us, with history of food allergies, she still recommended holding off on dairy until a year as DD seemed sensitive to dairy, but we started giving her wheat etc at about 8 months. I personally held off giving her peanuts and shellfish as these are the scary food allergies in our family, and it took me a while to build up the nerve.  

 

I'd be interested in reading sources that have recommendations based on the latest research, though, as Oren is doing the whole rash-thing that DD did. 

post #188 of 256

I read something about this recently, I will see if I can find it again.....

post #189 of 256

Well, Levi will suck on a banana until it's pretty mushed, but anything else and he spits it out or gags and THEN spits it out. I just want him to have a steady weight gain and I don't know if my breast milk will be enough soon. He's quite the chunk!

post #190 of 256

Breast milk has more fat/calories than most things he would eat, so he'll be fine.

post #191 of 256

Now, my doctor isn't AP at all, so his recommendations might be different from you guys, but he told me that absolute ONLY thing that was 100% off limits prior to a year of age was honey. Anything soft enough on my plate for Conner to try, I'll let him try it.

post #192 of 256

Nicole, I know about the honey.... I heard the same thing about peanut butter, too! But then is any nut butter okay?? Hmmm. I need to look around some more. My baby feeding book is my well-worn copy of Feeding Your Vegetarian Baby... I'm pretty sure it would keep Jasper on a diet of winter squash and tofu until a year. Lol. 

 

That's interesting about what the nutritionist said, Kirstin. I think I have read something like that, too. 

 

I think I may do a little wheat soon. Maybe yogurt next month. 

post #193 of 256

I have given yogurt.  I haven't been brave enough to try eggs but perhaps I will boil some tomorrow.  The yolks are so fatty it would be great for B.

post #194 of 256
We are holding off on wheat and dairy because I've had kids with problems with them, but yes to nut butters. Shay has had lots. Because of the recommendations when my kids were young, it feels wrong, lol. He loves almond butter.

I'm also holding off on wheat because I know the minute I say go, people will start feeding him crackers and bread and forget about healthy food (I clearly don't think crackers and bread are healthy). I give him hummus on raw carrots (which he doesn't eat).

I still don't give him really acidic foods, just because I don't like rashy cheeks.
post #195 of 256

The answer is, we don't know they answer.  There is a bunch of conflicting evidence and theory out there in regards to allergies, so I personally don't trust any one doctor when they tell me what is "correct."  Because of our family history of allergies, we play it safe.  I've gotten more lax with each child, though, mostly b/c my first was the most sensitive and still is.  She broke out in hives on her face just last night from watermelon rind.  I think it's important to be aware of possible allergens and not discount the possibility that problems could be related to food.  But if there is no family history of allergies and no problems have arisen, then I don't think food introduction has to be complicated.

 

Honey is an issue b/c of botulism.  Infant botulism occurs most frequently in children under 6 months of age, though they are susceptible up to about one year old.  Older children can handle the bacterium, which can also be found in preserved foods or turned up dirt.  If honey is cooked above 185 degrees F (85 degrees C) then the bacteria will be killed.  So no worries about honey in baked foods.

 

Yogurt is not like plain cow's milk.  It's cooked, so it can be offered earlier with lower risk than milk or ice cream.  We start yogurt pretty early.

 

Nuts are just such a high allergen that we hold off on those for quite some time.  With dd, we waited until 2 for tree nuts and 3 for peanuts.  With ds1 we waited until about 1.5 for both and watched him carefully.  I'm sure we'll wait similarly for Avery. 

post #196 of 256

I don't know when I'll start trying eggs, but I've heard that the more raw you have the yolk, the better it is for baby.

post #197 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by seraf View Post

We are holding off on wheat and dairy because I've had kids with problems with them, but yes to nut butters. Shay has had lots. Because of the recommendations when my kids were young, it feels wrong, lol. He loves almond butter.
 

 

So the recommendations are different now?! Because I remember that peanut butter = the devil. Why so many changes?!?!? Lol.

 

 

Jasper's absolute favorite thing about eating is throwing his food on the floor for the dog. That's pretty much his main meal time activity. Sometimes, he will bring a bite of food to his mouth, see the dog, smile, and give the food to the dog. 

post #198 of 256

Amanda, yes, the recommendations keep changing.  Just a couple of years ago it was tree nuts age 2 and peanuts age 3.  This is b/c nut proteins are difficult to break down and can easily escape the infant's immature gut, actually creating an allergy that might not have been there had the food not been introduced so early.  If there is a predisposition to allergy, the problem was thought to be worse- causing even more severe reactions (like anaphylaxis instead of just a rash, for example).  Now the thought is the body needs to be exposed to small amounts of the allergens from an earlier age to get used to them or you might create an allergy later in life.  So basically completely conflicting ideas, but to me, the latter doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

post #199 of 256

I know I'm vegan, but surely I can't be the only one cringing at the thought of raw egg yolks and grated raw liver.  sulkoff.gif  lol.gif

post #200 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbk21 View Post

I know I'm vegan, but surely I can't be the only one cringing at the thought of raw egg yolks and grated raw liver.  sulkoff.gif  lol.gif

 

 

Nope!

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