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Need help with "laws" and advanced placement for 20m DD. (long post sry) - Page 3

post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post

 

Thank you for that...after some really great posts and words of encouragement I am starting to realize this is not "the end of the world" lol...

Thank you for the warm and fuzzy, "that's okay, I've done it too, she's gonna be just fine"  Really, it helps!!! 

 

post #42 of 44

I'm trying to put together the pieces here:

 

1. Your dd, 20 months, has recently started attending a school for gifted children aged 2 - 17.

2. The school is new and is still working to comply with state regulations. 

3. At this time, the school has only three full time students, whose parents do not leave during the program day.

4. There are also students with disabilities served by the program.

 

Based on this information, there is no way I would leave my child in this care situation.

 

Consider:

- the facility is not yet licensed or accredited.  Which might be OK except,

- they were taken surprise by the rules in re. 2yos, which means they are not familiar with the regulations.

- Apparently, this concerns other parents too, because while they are paying full time tuition, they are not willing to leave their children in the facility's care.  They are there all the time - what are they seeing that makes them feel they have to be on site with their kids throughout the entire program?  Why has the facility not been able to recruit full time students whose parents need to leave? 

- I don't know what kinds of disabilities you're talking about here, but I'm concerned that they may be in the process of throwing their doors open to all and sundry in the interests of raising their student count and sucking in some funding which can easily displace all other parts of the mission for new schools.  I'm not convinced that these people who are not familiar with state regulations are well-qualified to meet the educational and social-emotional needs of a diverse population of learners.  

 

It sounds to me like you've been sold a line of goods.  I've heard stuff like this before - you know.  "Our program is so awesome.  We want everyone to have a good experience.  Your child is so special.  She's such a great fit.  We want to keep working with her.  She brings in so much.  She's so sweet and smart and adorable and she just lights up our staff's lives.  It just hurts our hearts to think of her going to a different program."  Where is the information about what the program does for your dd?  These people have a lot of titles, but what are their credentials? 

 

Your child is 20 months old.  Her feelings are not a great indicator of the program's quality.  At 20 months, my dd was IN LOVE with a daycare provider who left her standing at the side of a busy street outside a city playground.  If the school was on top of things, your dd would never have been enrolled.  If they are any good, the school will still be around when she is old enough to attend preschool.  You need another option for this year.  A nanny might fit the bill.  A small at-home daycare with a mom who has older kids might work well.  You might have to settle for a center for the next 4-6 months. 

 

post #43 of 44
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post

3. At this time, the school has only three full time students, whose parents do not leave during the program day. 

 

- Apparently, this concerns other parents too, because while they are paying full time tuition, they are not willing to leave their children in the facility's care.  They are there all the time - what are they seeing that makes them feel they have to be on site with their kids throughout the entire program?  Why has the facility not been able to recruit full time students whose parents need to leave? 

 


Pretty much except the highlights.  The school has three full time kids, whose parents do not accompany their children during the day.  Those who attend part time are sometimes accompanied by their parents and sometimes not.  I don't think there is a lack of trust issue between the parents and the school, or that they are trying to sell anything other than what they have, but that it just my impression. 

 

Yea, I am thinking of looking at the prices for a Nanny.  Then maybe seeing about a neighbor and/or a couple of the parents at the co-op.  I think I am going to try a local day care too.  This might provide a great opportunity to try out some other things...see if we can place her back in the normal shuffle of things.  

 

 

post #44 of 44

My suggestion, in order to keep her relationships with people at that program, and comply with the laws, is to see if one of the part-time parents who home schools would be able to babysit your daughter?

 

Your daughter could go with that person as her caregiver to the homeschool program part-time, keeping up the relationships she's made. Then legally, I imagine it's like your nanny/babysitter taking her to any other homeschool program the family might attend, and the babysitter is the one legally responsible for the child the entire time, not the school/program. 

 


Edited by LitMom - 4/5/12 at 9:35pm
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