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What's the difference between Bradley Method and Lamaze?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Lamaze used to be about picking a focal point and panting. I know it's evolved since it's early days, and IMO looks a lot like the Bradley Method now. But I'm sure I'm missing something. What are the major differences between the Bradley Method and Lamaze?

post #2 of 20
Bradley was all about making the mom comfortable enough that she could "float through" her contractions. A little similar to birthing from within kinda stuff with gentle visualization and positive affirmations.There's also quite a bit of educating the consumer on birth choices for those going a more traditional doctor/hospital or birth center route.

I hadn't studied on this since the 90's but Lamaze seemed to have a lot of funny breathing and focus on on outside focal point.

They didn't have Hypnobabies when I was birthing but most of the moms I know who tried it felt gypped. Because if you get right.. there should be no pain. And as we all know, there is some... even with the most relaxed and happy of moms.. there is some discomfort.
post #3 of 20

Bradley method has the dad in the coach role and focuses a lot on diet too. 

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by philomom View Post


They didn't have Hypnobabies when I was birthing but most of the moms I know who tried it felt gypped. Because if you get right.. there should be no pain. And as we all know, there is some... even with the most relaxed and happy of moms.. there is some discomfort.


Hypnobabies is not about being "pain free".  No childbirth course is, and Hypnobabies certainly doesn't promise that it will be.  It's about being easier and more comfortable, which in my opinion, it was. Just had my 3rd daughter and 2nd Hypnobaby last month and would do it again. :)

post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honey693 View Post

Bradley method has the dad in the coach role and focuses a lot on diet too. 

The original Bradley did have the dad in the "coach" role. Hubby and I threw that part out. I hate coaching and cheerleading.

I love the Bradley diet. I gained only 20 pounds, had seven pound babies born eager and alert.
post #6 of 20

I did Lamaze with my first and Bradley with my second child. Lamaze gives you a basic understanding of what your body is doing, along with some information about how the hospital will handle your birth. I remember them telling me, as though it were the only way things were done, that I would have an IV, be in a bed, probably be offered meds, etc. Bradley focuses much, much more on what you're body goes through during birth, how to stay healthy and prepare for labor, finding and using your support system (and even though their main focus is husband/wife, most Bradley teachers will gladly accommodate a support person who is considered "non-traditional"), and ways to avoid excessive interventions. I was able to have a VBAC only 12 months after my C/S because I was prepared and focused with the Bradley Method, otherwise I might not have been as aware of what to expect from providers and facilities that wanted me to follow their medical protocol for the sake of safety, also known as avoiding lawsuits. I got A LOT more from Bradley than Lamaze. 

post #7 of 20

I just saw this now or I would have replied sooner.  Full disclosure: I'm a Bradley Method Teacher in NJ and I kinda think they're awesome, but I don't have anything against Lamaze in general. 

 

Lamaze has become a blanket term and not every class that says it is "Lamaze" is actually Lamaze based because of that.  Crazy but true, as they really don't go after anyone that uses the word Lamaze for whatever childbirth class they are teaching.  Many hospitals have what I like to call "obedience training" for patients and claim it is Lamaze.  What Lamaze has become today uses focal points, distraction, and breathing techniques.  It is not focused on Natural Childbirth, though true Lamaze is supportive of it.   They say they will educate you on all your options, which includes optional c-sections, epidurals and other drugs at birth so you can decide what will work for you.  It does not put emphasis on fathers/partners acting as coach.  Lamaze Educators create their own curriculum using the Lamaze guideline, their classes can be any length and duration the teacher chooses, and they can be accredited in a large amount of ways, including completely online.  Because of this the knowledge of the teachers, what and how they teach in their classes is varied.  You could take a 1 hour "Lamaze" class or a 6 week one and both would be called Lamaze though its obvious you would not get the same amount of information.  They do not have a maximum number of students allowed at one time so depending on the location you could be one of 30 or more students.  I'm not sure how their re-affiliation works or if there is re-affiliation.  http://www.lamazeinternational.org/ChildbirthEducationTraining

 

The Bradley Method(r) of Natural Childbirth is very protective of their trademark so when you find a Bradley teacher you know they are accredited through AAHCC, and AAHCC only.  http://bradleybirth.com  The Bradley Method is a series of 12 classes (like training for a marathon) that helps prepare you physically, emotionally, and mentally for the birth and postpartum.  Some teachers might do less classes, but they're not really supposed to, however if you for some reason called way late they will probably help you out and not leave you in a lurch!  Classes are intentionally required to be small- no more than 8 couples per session, often 2-5 couples.  It places a lot of importance on the active participation of the loving partner as a coach and childbirth being the birth (or rebirth) of the entire family unit, and gives him/her loads of preparation to help mom during labor.  It teaches that relaxation is key to a natural childbirth, how to stay low risk, nutrition, exercises, avoidance of drugs during pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding, natural abdominal breathing, tuning-in to your body, consumerism and making informed decisions about your care.  It also does teach about emergency childbirth, medications, and c-sections, what they are, how they work etc, but it is unashamedly pro-natural childbirth as the name implies.  You'll also get information on breastfeeding and instructors must attend a certain amout of LLL meetings and re-read The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding each year. 

 

The method has really impressive numbers.  Currently 87% of couples taking Bradley Classes go on to have spontaneous, drug free, natural, vaginal births.  It is the most successful and long standing Natural Childbirth education in the country.  All Bradley Educators are also Bradley Doulas, though they may not decide to attend births.  Bradley Method teachers have had at least one Bradley birth and nursed their babies.  They must attend a mandatory intensive 4 day in person workshop which is taught by the same set of people that have been teaching it since its inception, and candidates do months of papers, evaluations, book reports, etc.  After they become provisionally accredited they must go through a period of probation where they have to write an evaluation on every class they teach for two 12 week sessions (6 months.)  At the end of their teaching two sessions  they take their final exam and if they pass they become fully accredited, can use the letters AAHCC behind their name and must re-affiliate and do continuing education each year. 

 

Hope that helps!
 


Edited by *GreenMama* - 5/31/12 at 10:40am
post #8 of 20

Lots of great information here! Thanks for sharing!
 

post #9 of 20

Well done GreenMama!

post #10 of 20

Thanks Janet!!  Nice to "see" another Bradley teacher on here!
 

post #11 of 20

Hi everyone,

 

I'm not sure whether the Bradley Method discusses deep squats after the 35th week, but you might find this article of interest: http://wholewoman.com/blog/

 

Deep squatting is catching on as a preferred way to prepare the pelvic floor for birth, when in reality it has long been known to be a contributing factor in obstructed labor.

 

Christine

post #12 of 20
Interesting article, Christine. The Bradley Method discusses all aspects of pregnancy and birth, many exercises and positions for birth including squatting. Since this is a discussion of the difference between Bradley and Lamaze I'm wondering if you or anyone can speak to Lamaze's discussions of squatting.
post #13 of 20
Quote:

Lamaze has become a blanket term and not every class that says it is "Lamaze" is actually Lamaze based because of that.  Crazy but true, as they really don't go after anyone that uses the word Lamaze for whatever childbirth class they are teaching.  Many hospitals have what I like to call "obedience training" for patients and claim it is Lamaze.  What Lamaze has become today uses focal points, distraction, and breathing techniques.  It is not focused on Natural Childbirth, though true Lamaze is supportive of it.   They say they will educate you on all your options, which includes optional c-sections, epidurals and other drugs at birth so you can decide what will work for you.  It does not put emphasis on fathers/partners acting as coach.  Lamaze Educators create their own curriculum using the Lamaze guideline, their classes can be any length and duration the teacher chooses, and they can be accredited in a large amount of ways, including completely online.  Because of this the knowledge of the teachers, what and how they teach in their classes is varied.  You could take a 1 hour "Lamaze" class or a 6 week one and both would be called Lamaze though its obvious you would not get the same amount of information.  They do not have a maximum number of students allowed at one time so depending on the location you could be one of 30 or more students.  I'm not sure how their re-affiliation works or if there is re-affiliation.  http://www.lamazeinternational.org/ChildbirthEducationTraining

 


 

 

GreenMama-

 

You say someone can be certified through Lamaze completely online.  I don't think that's accurate.  Everyone who is certified has to sit for the exam, which is only done in person.  Usually, anyone certifying with Lamaze would attend a Lamaze workshop.  If someone were trained through another organization and then wanted to certify through Lamaze, they just have to have a certina number of continuing ed hours and sit for the test.  So I guess if the other program offered only online training, the only in-person part would be sitting for the test.  Lamaze accepts training from these organizations-

 

I think CBI does online training.  I'm not sure about the others.

 

There is an online study guide, which is used to study for the test.  Is that where you got the idea that you can become certified only online?

 

When I did my training through Lamaze in 2008, we could only advertise "Lamaze classes" if the class was at least 12 hours and had no more than 12 couples.  I don't think that has changed.  You're right that many hospitals advertise "Lamaze" classes and it has nothing to do with Lamaze International.  It would cost a fortune to legally pursue each hospital or individual that is using the term Lamaze incorrectly.  I hate that there is so much confusion about what Lamaze is about. 

 

The official philosophy of Lamaze says-

  • Birth is normal, natural and healthy.
  • The experience of birth profoundly affects women and their families.
  • Women's inner wisdom guides them through birth.
  • Women's confidence and ability to give birth is either enhanced or diminished by the care provider and place of birth.
  • Women have the right to give birth free from routine medical interventions.
  • Birth can safely take place in homes, birth centers and hospitals.
  • Childbirth education empowers women to make informed choices in health care, to assume responsibility for their health and to trust their inner wisdom.

 

Lamaze Certified instructors are given a curriculum to cover in their classes, although my understanding is there is a lot more flexibility of when to cover what with Lamaze than Bradley.  Part of what Lamaze classes should include the 6 Steps to Healthy Birth- Letting Labor begin on it's own; Walk, Move and Change Positions; Have continuous Support; No Unnecessary Interventions; Get Upright and follow the Urge to push; and Keep your baby with you after birth.  Lamaze has developed short videos that show each of these 6 steps.  I think they give a good overview of what Lamaze is about.  They can be found here-

http://www.injoyvideos.com/mothersadvocate/videos.html

post #14 of 20

Thanks for this interesting discussion. I went through Lamaze training 35 years ago and from what I remember, it was focused primarily on their style of breathing, which I think has been modified over the years. Does anyone ever mention Leboyer anymore? That was all very sweet - father bathing the baby under soft lights and hushed voices (as mama was being sutured after an unfortunate and involuntary episiotomy - thank goodness that is changing!)  

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by doulaASG View Post

You say someone can be certified through Lamaze completely online.  I don't think that's accurate.  Everyone who is certified has to sit for the exam, which is only done in person.  Usually, anyone certifying with Lamaze would attend a Lamaze workshop.  If someone were trained through another organization and then wanted to certify through Lamaze, they just have to have a certina number of continuing ed hours and sit for the test.  So I guess if the other program offered only online training, the only in-person part would be sitting for the test.  Lamaze accepts training from these organizations-

There is an online study guide, which is used to study for the test.  Is that where you got the idea that you can become certified only online?

When I did my training through Lamaze in 2008, we could only advertise "Lamaze classes" if the class was at least 12 hours and had no more than 12 couples.  I don't think that has changed.  You're right that many hospitals advertise "Lamaze" classes and it has nothing to do with Lamaze International.  It would cost a fortune to legally pursue each hospital or individual that is using the term Lamaze incorrectly.  I hate that there is so much confusion about what Lamaze is about. 

Hi! From what I was told the Lamaze seminars are given by several organizations/schools and could be via teleconference for distance learners. I actually think that would be kinda cool. And yes, as far as I remember CBI does some online certification and if Lamaze accepts that its another way to do it online. As I said, online training can be really useful. I take online seminars all the time for lactation information.

As for taking a test in person, I don't think that really really counts as doing training in person. Not that is necessarily matters.

Its good to hear that Lamaze has rules about the amount of hours and students. It really stinks that they aren't interested in legally pursuing entities that use their name without following those rules. It makes it really hard for the consumer to know what they are getting and means that they might not get the real information Lamaze has to offer.

Is there a way that a person can definitively know that a course claiming to be Lamaze is Lamaze? It is so confusing for a consumer, especially new moms that don't know the right questions to ask. I just wish they would spend the money to pursue it legally. If organizations knew they couldn't get away with using the name under false pretenses because they'd get sued they would stop and it would it would be so much better for moms. It's worked for TBM.

I don't feel like Bradley is inflexible at all! There are lesson plans, but after your provisional affiliation (student teaching period) is over and you become fully affiliated you can choose to switch things up with how you present your information. With a minimum of 24 hours of instruction there is loads of flexibility!
post #16 of 20

GreenMama, how does the provisional period work for TBM? Is there someone that observes your classes to make sure you're teaching everything to their liking?

post #17 of 20

Personal experiences will indicate differences; isn't that the bottom line, how we are able to apply what we learn?  In the Lamaze class that I took I learned a "little demerol" never hurt anyone; Bradley taught me how to discern the concept..."when the benifits outweigh the risks".  Lamaze taught me how to focus on the crack in the wall or anything in the room for that matter...a skill I never mastered by the way; Bradley taught me "mind to body" and to keep my eyes closed, to keep my environment calm and quiet, to breathe and surrender.  Lamaze taught me compliance stratagies and what to expect in the hospital setting; Bradley taught me a new vocabulary for understanding how my body works, the progression of a normal labor and birth and the importance of having like minded professionals around me supporting me.  The Lamaze class taught my partner how to rub my back and hold my hand; Bradley taught him physical, mental and emotional aspects and techniques of relaxation.  The Lamaze class taught me to huff and puff in a variety of ways; Bradley taught me to focus on and maintain deep abdominal breathing.  Lamaze taught me nothing about the food I was putting in my body; Bradley taught me what a balanced meal means and the importance of hydration and protein!  Lamaze taught me nothing about the decent of my baby; Bradley taught me about the Ferguson Reflex, the Hoquet Reflex, the Fetal Ejection Reflex and how the hormones in my body influence second stage.  The Bradley Method influenced my life to the extent I wanted to become a Bradley educator; Lamaze did not influence my life.


Edited by Janet Mahaffey - 1/20/13 at 7:43pm
post #18 of 20

Wow. A lot of misconceptions about Lamaze!  :innocent

 

This, from GreenMama for instance, is absolutely incorrect:

Quote:
"What Lamaze has become today uses focal points, distraction, and breathing techniques.  It is not focused on Natural Childbirth, though true Lamaze is supportive of it.   They say they will educate you on all your options, which includes optional c-sections, epidurals and other drugs at birth so you can decide what will work for you."

 

In order to be recognized as a true "Lamaze" childbirth preparation class, it must be lead by a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator (LCCE).

You can confirm if your educator is a LCCE here: http://www.lamaze.org/FindALamazeChildbirthClass

 

A true Lamaze class will have no more than 12 couples, with 4-8 being ideal.

 

The class must be consistent with the Six Healthy Birth Practices and the mission, vision and philosophy of Lamaze International (which have already been listed in a previous post of this thread).

 

Lamaze does focus on Natural Childbirth, and collaborates with the following organizations to make the scientific studies available to families so that they can make informed decisions regarding their births:

Coalition for Improving Maternity Services http://www.motherfriendly.org/

The Cochrane Library http://www.thecochranelibrary.com/view/0/index.html

The Childbirth Connection http://www.childbirthconnection.org/

 

The evidence shows that the simple, "natural" approach to birth provides optimal results for mother and baby, facilitates labor, lowers cesarean rates, and provides the opportunity for lifelong birth experience satisfaction. Yes, we definitely educate about the typical interventions that are seen in a hospital setting, but "informed decision making" includes not only the benefits, but the risks, alternatives and tradeoffs one can expect form each intervention/deviation from the physiological process of birth. 

 

Breathing is one tool for relaxation during labor. Visual focus is one tool for relaxation during labor. 

There are many tools and exercises that can prepare a woman for birth, and a Lamaze Educator works with her students to identify what will work best for each mother/family.

Not every family comes with a husband. Not every mother is comforted and supported the same way during labor.

There is no one-fits-all approach to birth. Aren't we lucky to have so many options!

 

Amanda Hynes, CD(DONA), LCCE

post #19 of 20
When taken out of context of the rest of the post I made it looks as though I am not in favor of taking true Lamaze classes. This is absolutely not true. As I've said and whole heartedly stick by- TRUE LAMAZE is supportive of and goes by the Six Healthy Birth Practices. They have great articles and put forth Science and Sensibility which I personally read.

The fake classes are unfortunately more prevalent than the real ones as evidenced by the fact that many hospital "be a good patient" 2-6 hour jam-packed with people classes are listed as Lamaze, and do exactly what I said.

It is unfortunate that the Lamaze name is stolen and used with no consequences. The abundant fake Lamaze classes make it hard for parents who may not be aware they need to go online and search to see if their teacher is accredited and that she/he is teaching the class as was intended by Lamaze.

You're right, not every family comes with a husband which is why many/most Bradley Method teachers talk about having a person as a coach which could be a husband, wife, boyfriend, girlfriend, mother, doula, trusted friend, etc.

I agree, it is wonderful that parents have choices. Not every class will work for every person. Not every teacher will be the right fit. We're all different.
post #20 of 20

Hi, I'm a Bradley Method teacher also and Janet Mahaffey, I love what you wrote. Can I use some of it when I'm emailing a prospective student who is on the fence about classes?

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