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what to do about pediatrician

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

My friend's daughter just had her one year checkup. The pediatrician told my friend that she must stop breastfeeding because her daughter has teeth and could bite her and give her an infection, and also that she just didn't need it anymore. I happen to go to the same practice with a different pediatrician who thankfully has told me that it would be fine to nurse my daughter 2 years or 3 years. It's one thing to have some uneducated person make a statement like this, but since she's a pediatrician, something needs to be done. I'm just not sure what. I thought maybe I should bring it up to my pediatrician when my daughter goes in for her next checkup.

post #2 of 12

This pediatrician is not adhering to the standards of his or her professional organization, the American Academy of Pediatrics. This organization states, 

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827.full

 

(emphasis mine).

 

I would encourage your friend to ditch this pediatrician, and submit a letter to the supervising physician of this clinic or hospital, emphasizing that she is uncomfortable with this advice, as it flies in the face of not only the AAP's rec, but also that of the World Health Organization. As a medical consumer, your friend should expect her physician to be up on the latest evidence-based medicine, and it is clear from statements like this that her physician is not.

 

From the WHO:

 

The World Health Organization's infant feeding recommendation

As stated in the Global Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding (WHA55 A55/15, paragraph 10):

Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants; it is also an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers. As a global public health recommendation, infants should be exclusively breastfed1 for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health2. Thereafter, to meet their evolving nutritional requirements, infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Exclusive breastfeeding from birth is possible except for a few medical conditions, and unrestricted exclusive breastfeeding results in ample milk production.

post #3 of 12
Is it possible that your friend has just decided that she is finished breastfeeding and that she was using this as an excuse since she knows your feelings about breastfeeding?
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post

Is it possible that your friend has just decided that she is finished breastfeeding and that she was using this as an excuse since she knows your feelings about breastfeeding?



No, she plans on breastfeeding for 2 years, and she brought this up on her own. I didn't even know she had taken her daughter to an appointment.

 

Also, even though I have strong feelings about breastfeeding, one year is an admirable goal, so no one need be afraid to tell me they're weaning. I actually thought she was only going to nurse for one year. I didn't find out that she had planned for 2 years until she talked to me after the appointment.

 

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by motheringforme View Post



No, she plans on breastfeeding for 2 years, and she brought this up on her own. I didn't even know she had taken her daughter to an appointment.

 

Also, even though I have strong feelings about breastfeeding, one year is an admirable goal, so no one need be afraid to tell me they're weaning. I actually thought she was only going to nurse for one year. I didn't find out that she had planned for 2 years until she talked to me after the appointment.

 

 

She knows that the pediatrician is out to lunch on this topic, right? I'd hate to think she'd wean based on that incorrect advice!
 

 

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

She knows the advice is incorrect. She's just frustrated with the advice, and I'm concerned that other moms might be given this advice. Now she's frustrated because her mother thinks she should do what the pediatrician says. I'm e-mailing her the website of the medical group if she wants to contact them, but I'm telling her that it's her choice in case she wants to say something. I don't want to push her, and I'm not sure it would be appropriate for me to contact them since it didn't happen to me, even though we take our kids to the same practice.

post #7 of 12

Aside from the medically inaccurate advide, the biting thing??? I guess it is possible, but I've nursed 5 kids, some of them close to 4 years, and they have never bit hard enough to break the skin.

post #8 of 12

My current nursling bit like a madman, but all well before he turned one.  My older one never bit except for one excruciating incident when he bit me in his sleep at around 2 1/2.  That did break the skin.  I can imagine biting getting bad enough that I'd consider weaning, but for a doctor to advise weaning because it could theoretically happen sounds crazy to me.  If I was you, I might mention it, like you said, the next time you go in.  Since it didn't happen to you, I'd think that it wouldn't have the same status as a more formal complaint, but it might be a good thing for other doctors in the practice to know.  

post #9 of 12

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by motheringforme View Post

She knows the advice is incorrect. She's just frustrated with the advice, and I'm concerned that other moms might be given this advice. Now she's frustrated because her mother thinks she should do what the pediatrician says.

 

She could tell her mom that his partner gives the opposite advice wink1.gif or just a copy of the AAP info.

 

My ds would do this lock-jaw thing in his sleep that hurt a lot but never made me bleed. My dd gave me a couple of bite on purpose but those didn't break the skin either.

 

What did bleed were dry cracked nipples when they were infants.

post #10 of 12

Its like advising that no one should ever adopt a puppy and play tug - of - war with it ...it could bite your hand!   Its just so sad that the bad advice just keeps on coming.

post #11 of 12

I had a doctor advise me to supplement my daughter with formula because she was only in the 20th percentile at 5 months of age. Of course, that's where she was at birth, and she grew slowly but steadily, remaining in the 20th percentile. I didn't want to supplement or add in foods before 6 months (or wean, which was his next piece of advice) so I found another pediatrician. This new doctor encouraged me to breast feed and was completely cool with me nursing well into toddlerhood.I nursed her for almost 2 years. She has plenty of breast milk but she really never ate more than a few bites of anything else at a meal. She was always the littlest girl in her classes, and in fact I had a "friend" who went around telling people that I didn't want to feed my daughter because I was afraid she would be obese as an adult (which was nonsense; the kid was just never a big eater.) 

 

My daughter is now 25 years old.. She is still is a very light eater.  She's about 115 lbs, 5'3" tall, which means she's still basically at the 20th percentile.

 

Apparently when God made my daughter, He made a girl in the 20th percentile. Force feeding her formula or baby food might have made her larger, but certainly wouldn't have made her healthier.

 

I guess my point is doctors are people, too, with prejudices, and sometimes you'll get stupid advice from them. I nursed three babies for close to 2 years each and was never bitten. Never, not once.

post #12 of 12

The PA at my son's 1-year well-child said I needed to wean (later revised that to "breastfeed for comfort, but you need to introduce cow's milk b/c it has the fat kids need to grow"). I called the office and asked who I should direct a concern/complaint to. They said the office manager, person in question, and head pediatrician. I also sent copies of my letter to the hospital patient advocate and also the CEO. I got a call apologizing for the faulty information I was given. 

 

I would suggest going about it through the proper channels (give copies to whoever they say to give copies to), in writing (so you have documentation of what gets said), politely, and also ask for a response. I think asking for a response (something like "please contact me and let me know what you are doing to make sure that everyone in your practice is giving up to date and accurate information about breastfeeding past 1 year") makes it less likely they'll ignore you.

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