or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › What do you really like about School for your child?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What do you really like about School for your child? - Page 2

post #21 of 33

beanmama the charter is lottery right? to me that means, i'd have have to apply to both if you take hs out of the picture. if that is so it seems like the decision is really not in your hands right?!!!

post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 

The charter is lottery, but we got accepted, so now we have to decide whether to accept the acceptance. 

 

The other middle school is our districted school so they hafta take us. 

 

We had a pretty good talk about it yesterday and wrote down a list of pros and cons for each school. I think she'd still like to homeschool, but after thinking on it and talking with DH I'm just not really prepared to go there unless the other schools don't work out so that didn't enter into the discussion. I do enjoy having the summers with them and if school got awful I'd certainly consider homeschooling, but I think the positives of school for my kids outweigh the negatives right now. If that should cease to be the case I would definitely revisit the idea.

 

I think what it's coming down to is that she has a friend (not a good, good friend, but definitely a friend vs an acquaintance) who is going to the middle school and she doesn't really know anyone who will be going to the charter except the girl (acquaintance) who will be a year or two ahead of her. Taking the friends out of the equation I think she/we feel like the charter would be a better fit. It's just that the friend thing IS important and she also doesn't want to disappoint her friend by not going. There aren't many kids from her elementary that go to this middle school. Most kids from our elementary are districted for another middle, so I think she feels some guilt at considering not going and leaving her friend in a lurch w/o other girl friends. However there's no guarantee that they would be in the same classes or section. (They divide the 6th and 7th grades into 6A and 6B and 7A and 7B and you stick with your group for the whole two years and have the same teachers, etc.) Plus dd1 and the friend didn't know each other before this year, so that just proves how easy it can be to make friends. She wasn't able to make a firm commitment yesterday in our conversation, but I had shown her some pictures from the charter school's fb page of them at the state Envirothon and battling each other with pool noodle swords at PE, etc, and I think that refreshed her vision of the charter. 

 

I hope to take her by both the schools this week just for an informal visit around the grounds and see how she feels about them. I'm feeling a little pressure to get this decided and done. 

 

Thanks for all your advice and experiences. It really does help me!

post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post

I'd be inclined to give the charter a shot as the regular ps will always be available.

 

This is how I'm leaning too, but I now need dd1 to be on board with it and she's a little conflicted and likes certain aspects of both schools.

post #24 of 33

Just a few additional thoughts, after scanning recent replies.

 

Role models... I can tell you that EVERY school has good ones and bad ones. Yes, even at "nerd school" (which is what we lovingly refer to my daughter's school as) - there are bad role models. Doesn't matter what the group is - athletes, nerds, geeks, drama kids, band kids, etc., etc. - you will have those who do things they shouldn't. They have sex, they smoke regular cigarettes and weed, they drink, they do other drugs, they binge, they are anorexic... Your daughter will run into them regardless of which school she goes to. And anyone who tells you otherwise is either lying or has blinders on. Not ALL kids do, but you will always have some who do. Yes, my daughter's school had kids suspended.expelled for coming in high or drunk. Her ex b/f's new g/f is anorexic. One of her best friends has had several pregnancy scares. And I'm not a fool - I KNOW my daughter will have a drink at a party. I also know that she will call me if she even has a sip and needs/wants to come home. Because she has, and she knows I won't freak.

 

As for friends... My daughter was concerned about the same thing before she went. She had one aquaintance when she started - they became better friends over the summer before starting, doing their research projects due when they got there. They both moved on after a year or so. My daughter recently has completely changed her group of friends, due mostly to some behavior she wasn't cool with from her girls. Thing about a small school like this is that the grades intermingle much, much more than they do at a "regular" school. The entire school eats lunch at the same time, there are some mixed classes, etc. The size pretty well ensures that everyone knows everyone else on some level. As long as your daughter is open to meeting anyone and everyone? She should be fine.

 

 

post #25 of 33

Why not "cheat"? The system that is. Your dd is guaranteed a spot at the local public school, and she got into the charter. Why not accept the space at the charter, and leave her on the enrollment at the public school as well. Then keep talking it through and see where she's at as the school year gets closer - if she's not going to have classes with her friend, she can go to the Charter. If she decides definitively that she does not want to go to the charter, you just let them know to offer her spot to someone else.

 

I'm in the process of getting my son enrolled in a charter for fall (he's 3yo - my city has free pre-school), and we are definitely playing the game - enrolling him everywhere he gets in, and then making a choice later.

post #26 of 33

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Super~Single~Mama View Post

Why not "cheat"? The system that is. Your dd is guaranteed a spot at the local public school, and she got into the charter. Why not accept the space at the charter, and leave her on the enrollment at the public school as well. Then keep talking it through and see where she's at as the school year gets closer - if she's not going to have classes with her friend, she can go to the Charter. If she decides definitively that she does not want to go to the charter, you just let them know to offer her spot to someone else.

 

I'm in the process of getting my son enrolled in a charter for fall (he's 3yo - my city has free pre-school), and we are definitely playing the game - enrolling him everywhere he gets in, and then making a choice later.

 

This-

 

If my DS was not totally dedicated to homeschooling we would be totally 'cheating' the system as much as we could.

 

As for homeschooling is your DD self motivated? My kiddo has been homeschooling from the start and I WOH and will be re-starting my career soon.  He is set up to do his work while I'm at 'work'.  He is VERY self motivated and able to do his work on his own.

 

Also with homeschooling you can do that nights and weekends etc.  There are virtual academy's, online schools etc.

 

With choosing a brick and mortar school, social aspects change.  Who she hangs with now will change drastically over the next few years. Even if she stays with public school.  Families move, kids transfer, there is a huge change in class schedules come JR/SR high levels.  Her 'BFF' now may not be her 'BFF'  in 2 years.  I would not choose a school based solely on the friend.

 

There is no reason you can't pick the charter for 7/8th then go back to PS for 9-12 or reverse.  You don't have to make the same choices for the younger kiddo.

 

*one thing I would look at is how much the school helps kids apply to university and educates the kids about university and post high school options.  Does the school have a good 'career' center, a good scholarship center, a college center.  Those types of things would be very important to my kid. (if he was in any type of school)

post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 

SSM, Well, I'm doing that a little bit, but you can only do it so far. I verbally told the charter yes, but when I turn in the paper work when/if they request her school records that will trigger her being removed from the traditional middle school rolls. I don't want to do that because since she's in middle school she's already picked out electives if she does go to that school. So while we could conceivably sign her all the way up for the charter and if it didn't work out revert to the traditional public school, if we did that she'd lose all her electives and she's all about art and the electives so that would really suck. 

 

And the flipside is the charter won't hold her place. They have a waiting list and if we don't get her fully enrolled they'll give the spot away. 

 

mtiger, I know you're right. I'd just like to set her up to be happy and successful as much as I can and it's hard to know which route to take. 

post #28 of 33
Really? That is not the situation where I am, as the public/charters are totally independent of each other. Good luck with whatever you choose!
post #29 of 33
Thread Starter 

I called the district office and the very sympathetic woman I spoke to said that when the charter requests a child's record that child is then removed from the rolls. I didn't get the impression that it was unusual, but maybe I didn't understand it correctly. Maybe some other parents who have switched schools can comment? 

post #30 of 33

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post

I called the district office and the very sympathetic woman I spoke to said that when the charter requests a child's record that child is then removed from the rolls. I didn't get the impression that it was unusual, but maybe I didn't understand it correctly. Maybe some other parents who have switched schools can comment? 

 

That isn't entirely correct - you would be registering NOW (April or May) for September 2012.  Will your current school remove the student today for something that won't happen for 4-5 months?  What happens to 8th graders who apply to high schools that get early acceptance (fall semester)- does the current school essentially un-enroll those kids too?

 

As far as the electives go, around here there are plenty of spaces in electives for everyone (def. in jr high).  So even if your child is 'removed from the rolls' and then re-enrolls come the fall, she should get the classes she wants.

post #31 of 33
Thread Starter 

Well, the nice person at the district office didn't say she'd be removed from elementary school, but just that when the area charters contact the district for the records and let them know that the child has accepted the spot at the charter they remove that child from the next year's rolls — not the current rolls, unless it's a mid-year transfer. 

 

We were asked to fill out alternatives for the electives so I'm not sure that it's the same in our school as it would be in yours, but I don't really know, not having had a middle schooler before. They had a lot of cool electives, though and I wouldn't want her to miss out on them.

post #32 of 33

I know it's a hard decision, but you'll make the one you think is right - and it doesn't have to be carved in stone.

 

Electives wrt middle school. Ours also ask for alternate choices, and there is always the possibility that a kid won't get teir first (or even second) choice in a particular area. A lot depends on what sections the kiddo is put into for the core courses, and how the electives fit with those. And then there are some that are more popular than others and fill up quickly.

post #33 of 33

Another vote for the charter. I moved between seventh and eighth grade, from a small school to a very large, well-regarded public high school, and the smaller school was much better in most respects. In my case, it was a small private school, but similar in some ways to a charter now--started by parents who wanted a classical education for their children and with relative freedom to teach the way they wanted. Very, very small-between 10 and 15 kids per grade when I was there. But just excellent, in so many ways. I had a few outstanding teachers at the public school in the district people move to so their kids can go to the great public schools, but mostly it was very competitive and focused on getting A's, getting AP classes, getting National Merit scholars, getting great SAT scores, and less on actual learning. Very good school, many dedicated teachers, but a really different sense of purpose. How to write a good five paragraph essay, or how to write a solid 10 page research paper, vs. writing as a craft, writing for excellence. From my perspective now, I was unusually lucky in the small school; but among my friends who went to public school, my experience was the norm.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at School
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › What do you really like about School for your child?