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Best 3 preg/labor books youve read/want to read before delivery

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I want to read:

1. Ina May's Guide to Childbirth

2. Homebirth in the Hospital (saw it at my midwife's, looks interesting and relevant to my situation)

3. Natural Health After Birth - read a quarter of this but im saving the rest for a later part in my pregnancy. I found it really good and applicable. with my first pregnancy I never thought about the "after birth" part -- I was too focused on the pregnancy and birth itself. this book is so insightful and informative.

post #2 of 12

I've really enjoyed the Sears' Pregnancy Book, and Aviva Jill Romm's Guide to a Natural Pregnancy.  My sis-in-law also gave me a copy of The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth-- it's a bit dry and I haven't "read" it per se, but have used it for reference.  I'm also really enjoying Birthing from Within!

post #3 of 12

I'm loving Ina May's Guide to Childbirth, which I'm a little surprised by because I am not at all into spiritual or "touchy-feely" birth.  But the book is great.  I'm also reading Husband Coached Childbirth by the Bradleys (at least, I'm supposed to be) and I love Sarah Blaffer Hrdy's "Mother Nature: Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection" for an academic take on the whole process. 

post #4 of 12
Ina May was probably one of my favorites that I read, but that was 4 years ago! I could not get in to Birthing from Within at all, and I found The Thinking Woman's Guide to be frankly insulting to my intelligence and patronizing to read, though full of good information. I wish they had a more updated version of it. All of those I read 4 years ago when I was in my birth-junkie phase. I wasn't pregnant or even in a relationship at the time, though, so maybe that would change my view of things. I recently read Pushed, which I really liked, but it's more about the state of birth in America and much less a how-to guide.

I'm trying to remember what else I read that I liked. I gave up reading my Sears Pregnancy Book during my first trimester, because reading about morning sickness made my morning sickness worse, and reading about all the zillions of things I should be eating depressed me. But I should probably pull it out and give it another chance.

Interested to see what others recommend!
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyscience View Post

. I gave up reading my Sears Pregnancy Book during my first trimester, because reading about morning sickness made my morning sickness worse, and reading about all the zillions of things I should be eating depressed me.

 

Haha, love the honest review!! lol.gif I too feel like I eat healthy but if I consult a "what to eat" pregnancy book I start to have anxiety about the fact that I didn't eat walnuts, kidney beans, sweet potatoes, and yogurt all by 9am today. lol

post #6 of 12
Yeah, I've taken to blowing through those sections in any book, because I figured billions of babies have been born just fine without their moms knowing that they need precisely 63.25 g more protein than they had before in their diet... as if all of us are following some sort of government-recommended diet to a T to begin with!
post #7 of 12

Honestly? I'm not reading any pregnancy books this time around. Every week I'll look online at what's going on, but other than that, I'm not immersing myself in birth-related stuff. I did enough of that the first time around. I trust that my body will do what it needs to do in labor and I don't stress about what I *should* be doing while pregnant. I eat what I can, take fish oil and a prenatal and exercise. If I need a specific natural recommendation, I ask my acupuncturist or look in my "Guide to a Natural Pregnancy" book.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

I've been reading Ina May's Guide to Childbirth before bed and I am so happy I'm reading it now during the third trimester. It is really getting me into the right place to give birth. What I mean is, instead of simply relying on the "past experience" file that my brain has connected to the concept of "birth," reading all of these unique, amazing stories and hearing Ina May's brilliant insights have really moved me to another place when I think about this coming birth. I feel so much more, relaxed, open to possibilities, less afraid, and just sort of supported by all the women talked about in the book even though I don't actually know them.

post #9 of 12

I just got a copy of "Spiritual Midwifery" by Ina May Gaskin. I read her book "Ina May's guide to childbirth" last time around and really liked it, and was really looking forward to reading Spiritual Midwifery since I'd heard so much good things about it. But, I've just not connected at all with the "spiritual" stuff in in. Like, at all! I'm not really sure why, maybe I am just not in that head space yet or something, or maybe the third time around I'm more in a "get this job done!" mode. 

 

The last two times, I also read "Natural childbirth the Bradley way" and really liked it. I will read it again sometime soon. 

 

 

So, talking about birthing books, is anyone else annoyed that some of the natural birthing books have old stories/pictures - like, hippies from the 70s???

 

Not that I have anything against hippies in the 70s, I just don't connect as well to the stories. I feel like when these books were published, the stories and pictures were intentionally chosen to show people who were like their reader group to say "look, your peers are doing this, its natural, its normal" I feel like I am having to relate to hippies in the 70s, and it doesn't work as well for me. Funny, I read all these birth stories with my first and second pregnancies, and it didn't have this effect on me. I still will read all the stories - I think there is a timelessness to the power and wisdom in birth, and people don't change that much, and will gain a lot from them. I just wish that Ina would update with some stories of people who "look like me"! :)

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Chickadee View Post

So, talking about birthing books, is anyone else annoyed that some of the natural birthing books have old stories/pictures - like, hippies from the 70s???

I have this same problem, particularly with the natural birth videos our Bradley instructor shows.  They're cool videos and pretty empowering, but man everyone has ridiculous hair and giant glasses and its sometimes hard to take it seriously.  Maybe I'm just shallow, but I do think I would connect with it a little more if it didn't feel like the last time anyone gave birth naturally was 1976.

post #11 of 12

MamaChickadee / LilyTiger - I have this same sentiment!!  I love reading Ina May's books and I find her birth stories very positive and empowering, but I have to avoid the vintage photos and videos!!

 

AFM - I've exhausted pretty much all the pregnancy literature out there and with 9 weeks left to go, I'm now definitely shifting my reading towards newborn care and breastfeeding (which I have NO clue about!!).... I just finished Pregnancy Childbirth and the Newborn, the Complete Guide (4th ed.) which I thought was a really good reference book - especially for someone who's having a hospital birth.  It includes a well rounded overview of labor, what to expect/feel, pain management and relaxation, an unbiased look at hospital procedures, breastfeeding and newborn care.  I'm going to make DH read the 2nd half of it (covering labor and postpartum/newborn care), since it's so straightforward.

 

I'm now re-reading the Bradley book (Natural Childbirth the Bradley Way)... I had read it during a previous (but unsuccessful) pregnancy and will hopefully get DH to review it as well (since we are not actually enrolled in a Bradley class).  It gets down to some good details....

 

And I've just ordered from Amazon:  The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know About Your Baby from Birth to Age Two  (William Sears) and The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (LLL).

post #12 of 12

I'm reading and hope to finish:

 

Ina Mays Guide to Childbirth

Womanly Art of Breastfeeding

Secrets of the Baby Whisperer

 

I started Birthing from Within but it lost my attention with the extended time about art/processing old trauma's etc.  Good info, but not what I need from it.

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