or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › Is it possible for an Aspergers child to be overly social?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is it possible for an Aspergers child to be overly social? - Page 2

post #21 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen Muise View Post

My dd is very much like the OP, but on the ADOS she scored 0.  She does, however have CAPD, auditory dyslexia, giftedness and an anxiety disorder that cause her to act like an Aspie at times.  A lot of characteristics like rigidity and control, fixations etc. can be explained by more than one dx.  It can be very hard for even specialized professionals to come up with an accurate dx.  I'm not saying OPs kid isn't on the spectrum, just that you can't telll from a paragraph describing a kid what is likely to be going on with them.

 

I've wondered if ds2's issues may be related to these things, as opposed to the autism spectrum. I don't think he has ADHD and ODD, though.

post #22 of 37
Thread Starter 

hmmmm interesting... DS does seem very anxious at times. And sometimes I do wonder about ADHD .. But Aspergers runs in the family on my dad's side - also he has the stimming and vocalizations.

 

Harper Rose, read the article and loved the conversation on your page. "Liked" your page too!

post #23 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thing1Thing2 View Post

hmmmm interesting... DS does seem very anxious at times. And sometimes I do wonder about ADHD .. But Aspergers runs in the family on my dad's side - also he has the stimming and vocalizations.

 

Harper Rose, read the article and loved the conversation on your page. "Liked" your page too!

 

Aw, thanks! Looking forward to having you around there. :)

I really love the Autism Discussion Page. That man COMPLETELY gets it on so many levels!

On Punky/Soleil - she has a business called The Little Seed. You might find that on Twitter, too.

post #24 of 37

My ASPI ds is twelve and inappropriately social.  He LOVES to have an audience especially, so that he can go on and on and on about his interests and ideas.  He won't back off and is likewise often controlling of play.  He is quite uninhibited so he seems less shy than most children, but he still ends up isolated.  If somebody else has a game going on he is unlikely to be interested in playing it their way--unless he can get them to change the game, he will drift away and play alone.  The truth is, he doesn't know what the other kids are playing or why and he doesn't know how to find out and then adapt to them so he can join.  None of that is comprehensible to him.  He's basically friendly, though.  Tends to favor much younger kids or adults--both will allow him to take a lead role in interactions and take an interest in his ideas, while kids his age are not very interested.

post #25 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarperRose View Post


My focuses over the years:
 

 

Pregnancy

Birth

Breastfeeding

Natural living

Autism

Aspergers


 

 

I'm not on the spectrum but I have gone through period of intense focus -- to the point of autism like behavior -- on these exact items. bag.gif

post #26 of 37

Ds loved trains as well as other vehicles, Thomas was included!  But it was never the train schedule.  And he jumped from one subject to another with some recurring themes, so it seemed pretty varied.   

 

He memorized movie dialogue and watched same movies obsessively (like Back to the Future, parts 1, 2,and 3), loved weather, large numbers, phonics rules, astronomy, physics, Latin, Greek, anything that can be measured especially with huge numbers, and even the periodic table.  Oh and his cat.  And he created a superhero he was nuts about, and designed a country with a government and its own calendar and stuff.  His favorite book series (Warriors) and all the characters and stories.  There have been so many over the years.  And even with so much repetition it can be quite interesting.

 

FWIW it gets a lot easier to tell over time.  As agemates mature, the differences get much larger.  My son blended in a fair bit and the school didn't even think he needed any evaluation when he started school because he was academically ahead in reading and math skills.  It took until he was 9 or 10 years old for school to become a hopeless mess. 

 

 

 

post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thing1Thing2 View Post

hmmmm interesting... DS does seem very anxious at times. And sometimes I do wonder about ADHD .. But Aspergers runs in the family on my dad's side - also he has the stimming and vocalizations.

 

These conditions can be co-morbid.

post #28 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HarperRose View Post

 

 

Schools evaluate and diagnose for their own purposes. It is not anything close to a true medical diagnosis. I don't think anyone here is saying that the schools dx and it's law. It's just an aspect of the conversation.

 


Right, but I was responding to comments alluding to "my school says they won't DX with ASD because my child can xyz..."

 

A school can say all they want in terms of their own evaluation, but a private eval that is more nuanced and is done by someone who better understands ASDs will go much further in the school system.  It's much easier for a school to say "oh yea, we don't think it's ASD..." vs. seeing something in black and white in front of them. 

 

(I'm a teacher in an ASD inclusion program and evaluator for our program, so I might see it from a different angle.) 

post #29 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thing1Thing2 View Post
And as, you mentioned, Storm Bride, that having or not having one trait such as eye contact would invalidate a diagnosis is ludicrous! DS didn't get diagnosed with ASD by the school because he is way ahead in language and math skills.  But what about his 5th percentile motor skills? What about obvious gaps in his learning?

 

My ds can decode on what is by now likely a sixth grade level...but his comprehension is on grade level (2nd). Ds' capability to do math is there but is greater than the results; his evaluator thinks his math difficulties are due to the distractions of the classroom and that he needs a different approach. Ds' social skills are the most obvious ASD symptom. Ds is quite social but often inappropriately so, in ways previously mentioned. He has a few obsessions, not one overriding interest. He can make eye contact but it is usually fleeting: there, then not there. Ds has an IEP as OHI (other health impaired); he's been receiving speech therapy at school this year. We just received his evaluation results, and for next year he will be categorized as Autistic for his IEP.

 

When I sought ds' diagnosis I found the hospital first, then took the referral form to our GP with a bullet list of ds' behaviors and a stack of discipline forms from school. In turn the hospital eval supported my request for a school evaluation (the hospital found him on the borderline for ASD). When we did the hospital eval I was worried that ds would seem too "normal" as he does well with adults, particularly one on one, and he was on medication for ADHD which worked well for him--but they saw all that I saw, though at the age ds' was evaluated I had a year and a half of school reports to show them plus the evaluation his teacher filled out.

post #30 of 37
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmeline II View Post

 

These conditions can be co-morbid.

 

And that is another confusing thing. Your DS was diagnosed with many other issues *before* the diagnosis came for ASD. So I'm wondering why is it that it takes so long to get a diagnosis for ASD? If doctors know that there is comorbidity, then why do they stop at ADHD or ODD or any of the other disorders? Frustrating as it is, my main concern is not getting him the help he needs soon enough. The sooner they get help, the more likely it is for them to do better in school and life. So why aren't health professionals saying "Let's DX ASD earlier, so children have a better chance at succeeding."?

post #31 of 37

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair View Post

 

 


Right, but I was responding to comments alluding to "my school says they won't DX with ASD because my child can xyz..."

 

A school can say all they want in terms of their own evaluation, but a private eval that is more nuanced and is done by someone who better understands ASDs will go much further in the school system.  It's much easier for a school to say "oh yea, we don't think it's ASD..." vs. seeing something in black and white in front of them. 

 

(I'm a teacher in an ASD inclusion program and evaluator for our program, so I might see it from a different angle.) 

 

Ah! I see. Yeah, the school's dx, in my opinion, is a joke and pointless. I don't know why they waste time and resources when the dr already made the diagnosis. You know? You know the kid has X-condition. Now work with it.

And even though our schools had/have my son's white papers in front of them w/ his medical dx, they STILL want to run evals and make us do all kinds of paperwork and everything else. To me, it's pointless. 

Though, given your perspective as an evaluator, I'd love to know why they do that, even though they have the medical dx.

 

post #32 of 37

in the district I work in, in order to be eligible for the specific ASD inclusion program I work in there needs to be a certain number of tests given and criteria of those tests met.  So, for some kids applying they already have all those tests and we don't need to re-do them.  If they don't have those particular tests (but have others that say they have an ASD) we still have to do them.  

 

But our program is an aberration, if a child is enrolled in their local school there is not always one test they NEED to have to qualify for anything specific.  

 

I also think that there are tests certain school psychologists are comfortable administering and understanding, and a big neuropysch could have a bunch of tests s/he doesn't know.  

post #33 of 37

I hope this may help someone here. We recently received a dx for our daughter. She has Aspergers. It's so hard to type that! I'm still dealing with grief and a reframing of my own view on my family, my child and the world in general. It's a lot to learn. Our path was thus. Her teacher kept harping on our child's attention span and her lack of focus and interest in certain classroom activities. Knowing (from birth) that she was a little different, I was not too worried. She has always wanted to do things her own way. I have 5 kids, so I could easily tell the differences between her and her siblings. So, anyway, I thought she might have celiac's like me, so put her on a GF diet. Her behavior improved a little, for a short period, but it wasn't the issue. So we took her to our Gp, who referred her to our community mental health system, after I relayed the symptoms to our GP. They thought immediately of aspergers. I didnt, but they apparently could see more clearly than me.  So, we had two seperate screenings, with lots of tests, took about 2 hours each time, and then received the Dx. So now, she has more screenings and therapy. I know nothing about how it all works, but I'm very glad to have gotten the dx so we can move forward and get help.  Persevere and get the help and info you need!  - Jen

post #34 of 37
Thread Starter 

Thank you. Would you mind if I asked what kind of tests and screenings they did? We went through the school district and I dont feel DS was tested enough in certain areas.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair View Post

in the district I work in, in order to be eligible for the specific ASD inclusion program I work in there needs to be a certain number of tests given and criteria of those tests met.  So, for some kids applying they already have all those tests and we don't need to re-do them.  If they don't have those particular tests (but have others that say they have an ASD) we still have to do them.  

 

But our program is an aberration, if a child is enrolled in their local school there is not always one test they NEED to have to qualify for anything specific.  

 

I also think that there are tests certain school psychologists are comfortable administering and understanding, and a big neuropysch could have a bunch of tests s/he doesn't know.  



Thanks for the info on this. Kind of nice to know an inside view. :D

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thing1Thing2 View Post

And that is another confusing thing. Your DS was diagnosed with many other issues *before* the diagnosis came for ASD. So I'm wondering why is it that it takes so long to get a diagnosis for ASD? If doctors know that there is comorbidity, then why do they stop at ADHD or ODD or any of the other disorders? Frustrating as it is, my main concern is not getting him the help he needs soon enough. The sooner they get help, the more likely it is for them to do better in school and life. So why aren't health professionals saying "Let's DX ASD earlier, so children have a better chance at succeeding."?

 

My son first had the ADHD diagnosis from the psychiatrist; the hospital later confirmed it plus added on a couple more issues but, he wasn't diagnosed with ASD at that point. Why? Due to his age and his co-morbid issues; ds was so close to the borderline and ASD shares symptoms with other disorders so it was difficult to be definitive. The younger a child is, the greater the chance that the diagnosis will change later on; there is just such a wide range of development until around 7yo. Child psychiatrists and general peds are usually not aware of "finer" aspects of child development. Psychiatrists seem to find all symptoms within their speciality, and peds tend to take a "wait and see" approach; though I wish providers for children were more aware and less dismissive of parents concerns.

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by fairydoula View Post

I hope this may help someone here. We recently received a dx for our daughter. She has Aspergers. It's so hard to type that! I'm still dealing with grief and a reframing of my own view on my family, my child and the world in general. It's a lot to learn. Our path was thus. Her teacher kept harping on our child's attention span and her lack of focus and interest in certain classroom activities. Knowing (from birth) that she was a little different, I was not too worried. She has always wanted to do things her own way. I have 5 kids, so I could easily tell the differences between her and her siblings. So, anyway, I thought she might have celiac's like me, so put her on a GF diet. Her behavior improved a little, for a short period, but it wasn't the issue. So we took her to our Gp, who referred her to our community mental health system, after I relayed the symptoms to our GP. They thought immediately of aspergers. I didnt, but they apparently could see more clearly than me.  So, we had two seperate screenings, with lots of tests, took about 2 hours each time, and then received the Dx. So now, she has more screenings and therapy. I know nothing about how it all works, but I'm very glad to have gotten the dx so we can move forward and get help.  Persevere and get the help and info you need!  - Jen

 

Jen -- I really remember that sense of grief and uncertainty about what the future would hold for me, my son, and my family. I am nearly four years out from his diagnosis and I just wanted to reassure that that it gets better! I have come to understand so much more about ASD and can see what gifts it brings my son in addition to the challenges. He is doing really beautifully and I feel optimistic about his future. I hope this is your road, too.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Special Needs Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › Is it possible for an Aspergers child to be overly social?