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What factors impacted/will impact your vaccination decisions? - Page 2

Poll Results: What were the major factors in the vaccine decisions you made/will make?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 7% (21)
    nutritional source (i.e., breastfeeding or bottle feeding)
  • 7% (22)
    childcare plans (e.g., daycare, staying at home)
  • 7% (22)
    disease prevalence in your area (i.e., where you are raising your children, or traveling with them)
  • 7% (23)
    lethality of diseases being vaccinated against
  • 10% (31)
    officially recognized side effects of vaccines (i.e., effects listed on the product inserts, or accepted/recognized by most medical providers)
  • 7% (22)
    non-officially recognized side effects of vaccines (i.e., effects not listed on product inserts, and not widely accpeted/recognized by most medical providers)
  • 4% (14)
    known health issues specific to your child (e.g., immune disorders, allergies)
  • 4% (12)
    known health issues specific to another family member (e.g., immunocompromised parent/sibling)
  • 9% (29)
    vaccine ingredients/manufacturing process (e.g., thimerosol, human cells)
  • 2% (8)
    religious beliefs or teachings
  • 9% (28)
    effectiveness of vaccines
  • 6% (18)
    personal experience with a vaccine-preventable disease (e.g., having chicken pox yourself, having a family member crippled by polio)
  • 4% (14)
    personal experience with a vaccine reaction (yourself or someone close to you)
  • 9% (29)
    general philosophy/beliefs about medicine
  • 0% (2)
    obligatory other
295 Total Votes  
post #21 of 40
I think a reason for the hostility is because, this is the researching vaccines forum. If she came on here and said, I vaccinate on schedule because I feel it is selfish not to, and I feel like I am endangering my community by not vaccinating, I think that would have been better received. Instead, she implied that OTHERS who do NOT vaccinate are selfish and endangering THEIR communities, which I think will rub a lot of posters the wrong way. Then she finished her post with a very condescending "get your vaccines and get your children vaccinated properly."
post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyscience View Post

Just a reminder to all - this is a place to share about YOUR reasons for YOUR vaccine decisions. I don't think that anyone's opinion about anyone else's vaccine decisions have any place in this thread. Nor does arguing about whether or not someone else is offensive further the aims of this thread in the least.
Exactly. The post is off-topic and against forum guidelines, which state:
Quote:
We embrace all parents, regardless of their vaccination choice. We uphold the Vaccinations forum as a place where they can come and discuss all aspects of all vaccinations, and find support in their desire to make an informed decision to not vaccinate, to vaccinate, to selectively vaccinate, or to delay vaccinations. We would like all members to understand that this forum is not an anti-vax forum but rather is a forum to discuss issues and concerns so that parents can make an informed decision. We are not, however, interested in hosting discussions advocating for mandatory vaccination.

This is a community forum and all members will be expected to demonstrate and maintain their community participation and not an agenda-focused manner of posting. Members are invited to report any such agenda-focused behavior. We will certainly uphold the integrity of the forum and restrict such behavior.

http://www.mothering.com/community/a/vaccination-forum-guidelines

Please note that both opinions AND facts are allowed and welcomed here. Just keep it on topic. That includes some of the back-and-forth that is far better suited for PM, by the way... thumbsup.gif
post #23 of 40

From all my recent research about DTaP, I randomly found a pro vax site where they urge members to log in to MDC pretending to be parents and comment in the vax boards?  So when I see a post like that from someone with only 2 posts to his/her name I get suspicious.  If a person has strong opinions like that but is a real member of MDC with many posts to their name it's one thing...

post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukuspot View Post

From all my recent research about DTaP, I randomly found a pro vax site where they urge members to log in to MDC pretending to be parents and comment in the vax boards?  So when I see a post like that from someone with only 2 posts to his/her name I get suspicious.  If a person has strong opinions like that but is a real member of MDC with many posts to their name it's one thing...

 

Which site is it?

post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukuspot View Post

From all my recent research about DTaP, I randomly found a pro vax site where they urge members to log in to MDC pretending to be parents and comment in the vax boards? 

I'm really sorry to hear this.  greensad.gif  I'm trying to wrap my head around all of the fanaticism...all the while trying to remain compassionate and empathetic about where these people are coming from. 

 

Granted, a handful may be just arrogant and pugnacious and love a good Internet "debate"...especially when they're protected by the relative safety of monitor and moniker.  But I think that the majority are genuinely worried and angry at us.....but coming from an understandable place.  Specifically, although news media and radically pro-vax doctors like to portray vaccine skeptics of being irrationally "scared" and part of a "culture of fear," I think that many of the pro-vaxxers get swept up in their own fear-mongering. 

 

They panic when they hear that polio is only a plane ride away, (my kids are up to date on their IPV, but note that we've been waiting for that dreaded "flight" since 1979, when the U.S. saw its last case of wild polio).  They freak out when they watch The Practice on TV and see a poor kid die of measles....inferring inevitably from this Tinseltown portrayal that measles is like ebola and means instant death.  And because all of the vaccines and VADs get generalized into one big lump, (e.g. "Immunizations are important.  Just look at how horrible polio was....") they get the message that skipping ANY of the vaxes means death and doom....or that skipping ANY of them means that all of those diseases MUST be casually--and commonly!--communicable.  I can no longer find the link on the State of Oregon's site, (hopefully they took it down because it was ridiculous!), but there was a page that summed up all VADs with the message of, "Your child can catch these diseases ANYWHERE!"  (Are they sharing drug needles at the neighborhood sandbox?? headscratch.gif)   I largely blame public health programs like this, as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics and its corporate sponsors, for their role in stirring up fears and freaking people out this way. 

 

My point is this: As much as we may bristle at the name-calling, (in my book, adjectives are names to call people as much as nouns are, so "incredibly selfish" does fit that bill), it's not too much to ask that even if we disagree, we still make an effort to understand where they are coming from.   

 

I guess all of that brings me back to this thread topic (finally, lol!  winky.gif) about what influences our vax decisions.  Fear was not an option in the poll.  But unfortunately, I think that it does play a role in a lot of peoples' decisions.  But fear is not a good reason to consent to a medical intervention.  And fear is not a good reason to decline a medical intervention.  That's part of what makes this issue so multifaceted and complex.    

 

By the way, before reading the recent upheaval in this thread, I was logging on to say that I like the first eight posts.  The moms may have all come to different conclusions, but it sounds like everybody was open-minded to recognize that this is an evolving issue in which gray areas may emerge.  That has long been my position.  thumb.gif

post #26 of 40

I'm sorry all, I don't remember the site.  I have looked at SO many websites over the last month as I have been researching DTaP for toddlers...And that site was so shocking that I just closed the browser.  I really don't remember the name or how to get back there.

post #27 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post

 

I guess all of that brings me back to this thread topic (finally, lol!  winky.gif) about what influences our vax decisions.  Fear was not an option in the poll.  But unfortunately, I think that it does play a role in a lot of peoples' decisions.  But fear is not a good reason to consent to a medical intervention.  And fear is not a good reason to decline a medical intervention.  That's part of what makes this issue so multifaceted and complex.    

 

By the way, before reading the recent upheaval in this thread, I was logging on to say that I like the first eight posts.  The moms may have all come to different conclusions, but it sounds like everybody was open-minded to recognize that this is an evolving issue in which gray areas may emerge.  That has long been my position.  thumb.gif

 

There are several things I've thought of since I put up the poll that I wish I had included. Things like the opinion of one's spouse/partner, advice/opinions from medical providers, schooling decisions, state exemption policies, feelings on responsibility to society vs. responsibility to one's child, and the like. And fear is an interesting one I didn't think of. I think it *can* be implicit in some of the responses (like disease lethality or side effects), but it's possible to make either a rational OR a fearful decision based on either of those things. And sometimes it can be hard to tell them apart, or it may be a mixture of both. This is why I started this thread - I think there are so, so many things to consider about this decision. I really do feel like it is possible to weigh all these factors and come to different conclusions about vaxing, and I love seeing more about others' thought processes in the matter, because it helps me question and clarify my own thinking.

 

A little more about my thinking on vaccination: I didn't actually check general philosophy about medicine, but I'm starting to realize that that is a factor for me, to some degree. I believe the purpose of medicine is to help our body in instances when it can't help itself. Obviously, what constitutes not being able to "help itself" will vary quite a bit depending on who you are asking. For me, I do think that vaccines have the capability to induce immunity in our bodies, and I haven't seen evidence that persuades me that inducing immunity in this way is innately harmful. At the same time, for diseases that are rarely lethal or serious, or that are easily treated through other medical means (such as antibiotics), I'm inclined to let the immune system do its work in the most natural way possible - through direct exposure to the disease, should it ever come to that.

 

As far as responsibility towards society vs. responsibility toward my particular child, I would certainly tend to favor putting the welfare of my particular child over the welfare of "society." HOWEVER, I also do not see this as being a major conflict in my plans to do selective/delayed vaccination. If we were experiencing a disease outbreak wherein my child was likely to catch and spread the disease to many others, quite possibly fatally, I would absolutely have them vaccinated against it. If this were prior to eradication of polio in the US, we would be getting the polio vax. I certainly plan to vaccinate against polio if we are ever planning to travel any place it is still a problem. Although, again, if that were really the case, it would be in my child's best interest to have the vaccination, too. I guess I just really don't see the conflict between others' best interests and my child's. I do think that if I choose not to vaccinate against certain things, I have a responsibility to be extra vigilant when my child does get sick to monitor symptoms and make sure to limit exposing others do my child's illness, especially if it is a VPD. But honestly, I think I ought to be trying to keep my sick child away from other children, anyway! Not sure if all of that made sense, but hopefully it made at least a little sense.

post #28 of 40

We are global citizens. My family travels extensively. I have no second thoughts about my kids vaccinations. I have seen the diseases vaccines prevent wreck havoc in places where there isn't adequate coverage. 

post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyscience View Post

 

 And fear is an interesting one I didn't think of. I think it *can* be implicit in some of the responses (like disease lethality or side effects), but it's possible to make either a rational OR a fearful decision based on either of those things. And sometimes it can be hard to tell them apart, or it may be a mixture of both. This is why I started this thread - I think there are so, so many things to consider about this decision. I really do feel like it is possible to weigh all these factors and come to different conclusions about vaxing, and I love seeing more about others' thought processes in the matter, because it helps me question and clarify my own thinking.

 

Fear is an interesting word. I do not really see fear as the deciding factor for most people - unless they have had personal experience with either a VPD or vaccine reaction.  I think most people weigh the numbers and make what they believe is a rational decision.

 

If we do use the word "fear" though, I think it comes down to:

 

non-vaxxers are more fearful of vaccine reactions

vaxxers are more fearful of the diseases 

 

 

Another emotion that comes to mind for me and the vaccine question is guilt.  What would make you feel guiltier - a child having a serious reaction to a vaccine or a child having a serious reaction to a VPD?  For myself, it would be the vaccine reaction.  Vaccine reactions are 100% preventable, while most VPD's are not.  YMMV.

 

 

 

As far as responsibility towards society vs. responsibility toward my particular child, I would certainly tend to favor putting the welfare of my particular child over the welfare of "society."

 

Agreed.  I think it is our primary job as parents to keep our kids safe.  If, for one reason or another, you don't think vaccines are safer than remaining unvaxxed, it is unethical to vax them for the sake of society.  

post #30 of 40

This is a great thread. I am really gaining some understanding of how people have made their decisions.

 

I vaccinate on the recommended schedule, for many reasons. I'm an advanced practice nurse and prior to that took a lot of bio as an undergrad, so obviously it syncs with what I've learned in the course of my studies and with the research that continues to be done. I've traveled and lived abroad in sub-Saharan Africa and have seen the long- and short-term consequences of not vaccinating. Personally, I had a vicious case of chicken pox and wouldn't wish that on my kid. I was selectively, mostly not vaccinated until I was a teenager when I made the decision to get caught up, basically because the waver process for school and sports became too onerous and because I had developed different views on the issue than my mom. Neither me nor anyone in my family have had a bad reaction to a vaccine. I have one relative who was completely deafened by mumps and another who had polio as a child and now suffers from post-polio syndrome, and may eventually be wheelchair bound. I feel a duty to be vaccinated and vaccinate my kid to protect people who can't be vaccinated or who are immunocompromised. I think the herd immunity theory is very sound. 

 

I think that pretty much wraps it up. :)

post #31 of 40

I already voted in the poll but I will write now.

 

Recently, every month that passes I become more disgusted with allopathic medicine, (for my own health issues and nothing to do with vaccines). banghead.gif x 1,000,000,000.  I am not satisified with the "known" safety of adjuvants in vaccines. I am also not convinced that vax beats natural infection advantages on numerous childhood diseases on the standard vax schedule. I think the number of vax on the US pedi schedule is absolutely ridiculous and will only continue to grow. Normal diseases like roseola will become totally feared like chicken pox has become in my lifetime, and measles the generation before me. I do not think parents concerned with vaccine safety are listened to and I find it absolutely disgusting that they would be denied care. I think the pharma industry has corrupted govt policy with revolving door between govt. positions and pharma positions, lobbying, and paid for "studies" which are totally inadequate. I do not think there are adequate exemption possibilities in all states. Informed consent about vaccines does not exist in the US. 

I could and do find value in certain vaccines. But quite frankly the whole industry and dogma surrounding it makes me want to puke.gif

I find it totally suspicious that other "western" nations have different pedi vax schedules and somehow kids manage to survive there?? wow!!??

I do not find problem with questioning cdc/fda/pharma as they have been at fault for numerous problems in the recent past, about other drugs and/or vax I think anyone who ignores those continuous problems with these agencies and transparency is blind or too fearful to deal with reality.

I really really really really don't understand why chicken pox is a mandatory vax for school entry in US. It is not in the country I am living currently.

I could go on and on and on and on.... But I don't want anyone screwing with this thread to argue with me. What I have stated is my "opinion," like the other poster who stated all non-vaxers are "selfish," and another thread where I am an "anti- intellectutal" and another thread where I am "incredulous and intolerable".  smile.gif

post #32 of 40

Interesting! I marked the things we looked at, but something looking at what is done in other developed countries would have been good options for the poll too, and school/preschool requirements. I do consider what Canada and Europe do when deciding what to do in the US. The healthcare systems and interplay between politics and corporations make a big difference to me. Family history-wise, I had a family member who caught an illness from an oral vaccine. And an allergic vaccine reaction in another older family member. 

 

My kids are legally up to date, and were by the time they started preschool. But we did spread out some vaccines within those early years so we could do only 1-2 at once. No, I don't think that put anyone else at risk. They weren't in group care, they were breastfeeding, and my "delayed vax" 12 month old was no more "potentially contagious" to anyone else than a standardly-vaxed 7 month old. 

 

My younger child has not had the last HepB booster, because he had severe hives after the vaccine, and continuing for 5 months even with serious antihistamines. I think the two doses he has had will have to suffice for any random risks in childhood (unlikely since DH, I, DD, and I happen to know, the nanny, have all had the full series of HepB vax). And when he gets to sexually-active ages, we will have to discuss with him, the allergist, and the family doctor and decide if he should have the final shot in the series, and under what circumstances. The big question there is if the hives were from being exposed to the HepB virus itself or to some additive in that specific shot? I'm hoping, honestly, that some better method of HepB protection is developed in the decade or more we have before he reaches sexual maturity.


Edited by LitMom - 5/4/12 at 9:30pm
post #33 of 40

My grandfather founded a women's and children's hospital in our hometown.  My uncle ran it for a few years and was a pathologist, my mother was a NICU nurse, my other uncle is a nurse, one sister was a NICU nurse and is now a post-brain-op nurse, and my other sister is a labor and delivery nurse.  I chose to selectively vaccinate my son.  And then, chose to not vaccinate my next 3 children.

 

I believed in the vaccines 100% when I had my first.  But to me, it was also a matter of selection as there was NOTHING to indicate that 1. Hep B at birth is necessary or beneficial to my child, and 2. I had questions about other shots like Vit K.  So I did my research.  I called family members, I got information, and I delayed shots in the hospital.  This was a mixed blessing b/c my son had seizures 24 hours after birth, and we spent 4 days in Boston Children's and he had every imaginable test run.  He was released with a diagnosis of mild to moderate gross motor skills/physical development due to bleeding on the brain.  During my entire visit there, I found NO ONE who told me that the Vit K shot was essential or would help his situation, so we never got it.  After my experience in the hospital, I realized that getting answers to my questions was something that I needed to focus on, and I started reading every book.  Dr. Paul Offit has the pro-vaccine book, which I checked out alongside 'The Autoimmune Epidemic', and the Sears book, and I called everyone I knew in medicine.  I decided that 1. polio is important, and 2. my doc thought Hib was an key shot, and I respected his authority.  My son had a huge reaction to the Hib vaccine, high fever, screaming, swollen painful leg, and I did the series, but that added a new level of questions to my research. 

 

My sister had a violent reaction to the DTaP vaccine, and is mildly retarded.  My grandfather told my mother that she could never finish the series and that this was a vaccine reaction.  Nothing was done on a large level, but my family awareness was that there are people who are more at risk for reactions.  We also have a family history of autoimmune disorders.

 

When my daughter came along, I was still selective vax, but thought polio was unnecessary if I were keeping them both home, nursing, feeding them traditional foods and continuing the dialog with my Dr.  I also told him I was uncomfortable with the Hib for the first 4 months, due to the reaction.  My daughter had made it out of the hospital without having any tests run, and I had to return her to get the heel prick and other tests, and there was a distinct difference in her ability to process many of these events b/c she was 2 week old, not 2 hours.  After 6 months, my pedi said that the Hib was really not a priority anymore.  And I was recognizing that certain levels of disease are dangerous for certain ages, but not really for healthy older kids.  

 

Fast forward, and I'm now a homebirthing (my family does not approve and will not be in town when I have babies), non-vaxing mom of 4 strong beautiful children who are rarely sick.  I am not afraid of many diseases, and do keep in open and honest dialog with my pedi about each disease, outbreaks, what the steps would be for either vaccination or treatment of various diseases, and an honest realization that my children are not a hazard to the community as they are not exposed to disease at the same rate as children in other parts of society, and also, I am willing and able to quarantine any disease that we stumble upon.  

 

Dr. Paul Offit is the biggest reason I chose to not vaccinate.  His book turned me off to the entire mentality of the vaccine industry.  I strongly feel that parents, especially educated, aware, and active parents, are the ones who should make decisions for their children.  Vaccinate if it is the option you believe in, especially if you're scared of disease, but if you're more scared of the consequences of vaccines, you should NOT be forced to submit your family to them.  There are bad parents, there are cruel and stupid people out there, but they should not be the ones who dictate how the rest of us get treated for taking responsibility for our children.  

 

Blessings and peace-

post #34 of 40

I forgot to mention that my son ended up with no physical or other retardation.  He is very intelligent, coordinated, and Boston Children's neurology dept told me it was a 'miracle' based on his MRI's that he did not have brain damage.  He had a lot of bleeding on both sides of his cerebral cortex, and the blood there would have clotted and caused tissue to die leading to brain damage.  But it did not.  Another reason I continued questioning and researching was that the word 'clotting' set off my scientific radar.  Of course it didn't clot, he didn't get the Vit K shot.  His blood was not able to clot and cause brain damage.  That led me to also stop and wonder if nature wasn't making a mistake in this front- what if there was a natural reason that children actually benefited from NOT clotting immediately after birth?  And if so, how many other places in medicine are we preemptively striking out and missing the benefits of some natural processes?

 

And my husband, pro-vaccine, pro-hospital birth, became my biggest advocate in all our health choices.  

post #35 of 40

This is an interesting thread. Part of the reason I come to these boards (apart from my general love of most of Mothering Magazine, and Natural Parenting choices) is to understand the reasons why people choose not to vaccinate, and or spend effort encouraging others not to so this has been fascinating.

 

My children have been vaccinated on schedule (18 months in US for first one, then shift to UK schedule for her, and 100% UK schedule for 2nd). I made this decision based on my understanding of the modern miracle that are vaccines. I remember being massively impressed learning about the small pox vaccines in high school science, and as a scientist, even though I'm in a physical science not bio or medical, I understand a lot of the complications of testing vaccines for safety etc. I absolutely think we should continue to test vaccines for safety, and that the recommendations will changes as we learn more about the vaccines. But I'm 100% convinced that the recommendations to vaccinate my children are the best for them. 

 

Having said that, or course I had a moment of fear before each vaccination (what is this was going to harm them). The ingredients sound really scary, but then I do a bit more research, and I realise the quantities are tiny compared to environmental exposure, and that those things are there for a reason (either as a preservative to stop bacteria growing in the vaccine serum, or as an adjuvant which as I understand it helps the immune system respond to the inactivated virus in the vaccine more quickly). 

 

Another thing that drove me here are the different recommendations of different countries. For example my daughter was asked to get a Meningitus vaccines when she moved to the UK which is not commonly given in the USA, and varicella is not regularly given in the UK (ie. we'd have to pay a lot to get it for our son) so when he recently attended a US daycare for a few days I had to sign a form (against my wishes) that stated he was unvaccinated against medical advice. That was interesting! Clearly it's not all or nothing either way.

 

For me though I want to do the best I can to protect my children and the rest of the world from these possibly preventable diseases...

post #36 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all those who have pointed out that vaccination schedules are different in different countries - this is not an angle I had really considered, having lived in the US basically my entire life. See, I knew I could find some perspectives I hadn't considered if I started this poll!

Also, I DO think vaccines are pretty freakin' amazing science (biology major here!). And if smallpox were still running around, I would definitely use that vaccine, too. For me, like I've said before, so much of my thinking is dependent on my particular life situation. My decisions would be/will be very different if we wind up living in another country, having children with medical issues, or end up making different parenting/lifestyle decisions than we've planned. I still really like the comment that every vaccine opportunity is an opportunity to reevaluate our thinking. thumb.gif
post #37 of 40

I am an LVT and both of my brothers are doctors.  I had both of my children at home (dispite strong objections from family members) after alot of research.  THe fact that animals have such a lower rate of dystocia/c-section was a huge reason I started researching my birthing options.  However, I never bothered to think twice about the vax decision - I spent alot of time vaccinating people's animals and never saw a need to question human vaccines.  Both of by girls skipped the inital hep B vaccine because we were at home, but beyond that I stuck to the recommended schedule.

 

However, my youngest has had a range of vaccine reactions from minor to severe, and has never had a vaccine without inccident.  This got me thinking on this issue.  I have been declining the flu vaccine for years because I get the full fledged flu within 48 hours EVERY time I have gottten the vaccine, but never have gotten it on years I have declined the vaccine.  I started researching and I started using common sence.  In animals, we do not start vaccines until they have weaned for several reasons - research has shown that maternal antibodies can make the vaccines less effective, and the immune system is not mature, and the research has also shown vaccines to be more effective when the immune system is mature.  Now, all of this information id ANIMAL based, not human based.  But seeing as there is a lot of common ground between various species of mammals, it seems logical to me that it is very possible applicable to humans.  Long story short, my children will not be getting further vaccines until they are adolecences.  They are currently 3 years and 1 year, but when they are old enough for the discussion (based on their maturity, not age) I will tell them what they have had thus far, and let them talk to their pro-vax uncles and myself and do their own research and then respect their right to make a decision for their own bodies.  However, at that point, their immune systems will be fully functional and more able to handle the vaccines and they are the ones that have to live with the consequences of the decision, so I want to respect them enough to involve them in said decision.  Sometimes I regret that I did not look into this earlier, and then I realize that that is water under the bridge.

 

I am still in research mode for myself - rabies vax is strongly recommended for my career choice and so is tetanus.  But I want to really look into these vaccines before making my decision.  I want to be an informed consumer instead of just saying yes to my doctor.  I think this is important for all consumption of health services, making informed decisions.

post #38 of 40

BarefootMama99 - I'm curious if you're in research mode why you have a "Say No to Vax" icon in your signature. That seems a bit oversimplistic given your statements about your own opinions. 

post #39 of 40

Well, I will probably be in research mode for the rest of my life - new information can always change things.  However, I personally have said no to vaccines my entire adult life, and therefore it has been over 15 years since I have received any vax (my parents did choose to vaccinate).  I have stopped vaccinating my children.  I am tring to find more info, especially on the rabies vaccine due to the lethal nature of the disease and my higher than average exposure to it.  But it is a vaccine that is not given to the population at large, and more difficult to find concrete data on and I have been in the veterinary industry for almost a decade and have not had the vaccine yet (it was initially recommended by my college, and then by every employer I have had).  So while I will continue to seek more information, I will also continue saying no to vaccines for the time being, and I wish I had really thought about this more indepth when my kids were born.  I was already saying no to vaccines for myself, so it was pretty illogical to just go along with the vaccines schedule and not question it or look into it further. But such is life - we all make mistakes.

post #40 of 40

As this is a mothering site, I will not get into my beliefs on animal vaccines (schedules, risk factors, ingrediants, and so forth are quite different) and my say no to vax icon is directed at human vaccines (as I feel that is all that is relevant on this forum).

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