or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Welcome to Mothering! › Connect With Other Moms › Moms In Your Area › Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico › Birthing at Texas Children's Pavilion for Women with Women's Specialists mws
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Birthing at Texas Children's Pavilion for Women with Women's Specialists mws

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Has anyone here yet birthed at the new Texas Children's Pavilion for Women with the midwives?

 

I was planning for a homebirth but am too risky.  For my ds3, I had a hospital water birth in another state.  But I've heard that TX Children's Pavilion for Women only allows water labor...  :(  Just wondering if that is really true and how that works out.  Is there a tub in each room?  When do they make you get out of the tub? 

 

Also, I'd love to hear anything else re this hospital.  It is pretty much the only option I'm looking at, but I'd like to be informed as much as possible :) 

 

Additionally, I'd love to hear how they react to cosleeping in the hospital.  I did that with ds3 in another state, and no one ever said anything - but it was a somewhat crunchy hospital.

 

Thanks so much!

post #2 of 26

I didn't deliver at the new Women's Pavilion but at St. Luke's with the midwives. Take this for what it's worth, but they are probably pretty similar. When I was having my DD, I labored in the tub for awhile and then all of a sudden the midwife and my husband were getting me out. Don't know why. When I got to the bed for a check it turned out I was complete and ready to push. Maybe I sounded pushy? But yes, they want you out of the tub for the birth. 

 

Also, my mom asked one of the lactation consultants to teach my side-lying breastfeeding and she freaked out. So I don't know if that is the general consensus, but that's just my experience. 

 

I can't wait to hear more experiences from the new hospital! 

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thank you, KeenDoula-

 

The pulling you out of the tub sounds miserable.  Couldn't she check you *in the tub*?  I think that at this point, a mom is so vulnerable.  I'd like to say that I'd just fight back and stay in the tub - but I don't think I would have that ability. 

 

Did the mw position you a certain way for birth - or let you decide?  Do they have a standard positioning that they like?

 

Not teaching side-lying breastfeeding sounds like they must frown on co-sleeping...

 

Would you mind telling me who you birthed with?  (Maybe in a PM, since I'm not sure that is allowed here?)  I have developed a great relationship with one of the midwives.  And there is a mw there that I absolutely cannot stand - who said some really nasty, hurtful things to me.  I don't really know the others, except one kind of blew me off when I called during my m/c and said I could barely maintain consciousness.

 

With my ds3's birth, I had a crunchy hands-off mw who basically showed up when it was time to push.  I had a doula who labored with me.  My mw made it clear that I needed a doula.  I never was close with that mw, but I had a good birth.

 

I've heard that the mws here stay with you the entire time and don't recommend doulas.  Actually it seems like a lot of the moms I've talked to there don't know what a doula is.  Is it really true that the mws labor with you the entire time?  Do they often have more than one labor going on?  I really liked my doula with ds3, as she just helped me know what to do when I couldn't really remember, if that makes sense.  She knew when the right time was for everything.  The new hospital claims that the nurses are doulas, but I don't really know about that....  I don't want to be stuck alone without a doula when I need one - but I don't want to have a doula when I can have my mw be with me 100%.

 

Thanks so much for replying :)


Edited by aprilshower - 5/2/12 at 7:23am
post #4 of 26

Hi April -

 

I am looking forward to my first birth at the new location with a mama in mid-May. I have high hopes as it seems to be the most mother-friendly hospital in the area, telemetry units, deep jacuzzi tubs, rooming in, midwives, etc... but yes, if it is anything like the hospital policies at St Lukes, they will pull you out before you birth.

 

OTOH, one of the mamas that I attended (with Titi) pushed quite a bit before the midwife gently asked her to come to the bed, where mom hopped up in a full squat and birthed within a few moments afterward.

 

I have the most experience with Titi, only transiently seeing Theodora or Mary(?).  As far as I see, Titi is very accommodating of birth positions, having witnessed her help moms in squat, all fours, side lying, and standing/Captain Morgan. She encouraged one woman I was working with to push on her back and I leaned in saying mom has some residual 'ickiness' with the supine position, at which point Titi said 'well, by all means, however she wants to do it then!'

 

I have *heard* through the grapevine that sometimes waterbirths 'just happen' with the midwives, but have yet to witness it personally.

 

Finally, bed-sharing - a big no-no by all medical establishments in the Houston area. BUT, it is your baby and your right. I would highly recommend talking with your ped before hand, tell them your intent, give them plenty of information on the WHO and Dr. Sears and other studies showing bed-sharing safety and have that information on hand for the nursery staff/peds for your stay. :)

 

PM me if you have other questions or wanted to pick my brain by phone :) BTW, welcome to the area!

post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilshower View Post


I've heard that the mws here stay with you the entire time and don't recommend doulas.  Actually it seems like a lot of the moms I've talked to there don't know what a doula is.  Is it really true that the mws labor with you the entire time?  Do they often have more than one labor going on?  I really liked my doula with ds3, as she just helped me know what to do when I couldn't really remember, if that makes sense.  She knew when the right time was for everything.  The new hospital claims that the nurses are doulas, but I don't really know about that....  I don't want to be stuck alone without a doula when I need one - but I don't want to have a doula when I can have my mw be with me 100%.

 

 

 

Gha! Forgot to reply to this...

 

The midwives will come in and out, especially if you have a longer labor. It also depends on how busy they are. This area is not as knowledgable of doulas as others that I have lived, but that is slowly changing. :) Also, the midwives have never balked at my presence, in fact I had one say it was really nice having a doula there for a particularly interesting situation.. I have never heard that the midwives don't recommend doulas...

 

I  have yet to see a midwife with the mom the whole time. Usually from about 8cm and on...

 

The nurses are NOT doulas.. this is a great misconception that the women's pavilion is happy to perpetuate (and I mean that with all love). The nurses have been given some training that is natural birth friendly, such as how to encourage mom to be upright, birth balls, not discouraging vocalization, etc... but I doubt they will be giving you massages, counterpressure, acupressure, and the like. :) Their site says:

Quote:

 

Our nurses are trained in techniques that doulas use to support you during labor and delivery.

 

Trained in techniques... they are, by no means, doulas.. they will still be doing nurse things (which I am so grateful for) like IVs, FHT assessment, BP, etc... Not to toot our own horn, but doulas mostly work with natural births, whereas most women in hospitals choose medicated births... which means nurses see more medicated births than natural births...

 

ALL that to say, I think you would still benefit from a doula. There are so many great doulas in this area, I highly recommend going to doulamatch.net and looking at some in your zip code. :) Good luck and congratulations!

post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks so much, Cole Deelah :)  This is really helpful and informative.

 

I have had a horrible experience with the midwife you mention having the most experience with.  And I really adore one of the other midwives. 

 

It is good to know that there are accidental water births :)  I can hope!

 

Also really great to know that I can benefit from a doula with this practice.  I'll definitely be getting one :)  Do you think that the midwife will be as attentive if I have a doula, as opposed to if I don't have a doula?  I really don't want to be ignored because I have a doula...  I kind of felt like I birthed with my doula last time, and I'm preferring to have my midwife a bit more present this time.

 

Wow, re the uptightness about co-sleeping.  My ped is crunchy, and I'm really hoping that he is on board with co-sleeping...  I hate postpartum at the hospital *so much* because I feel like I always have to fight with the nurses and be on such high alert about everything.  And I just want some peace with my new baby, you know...  And my dh is always busy with my other children.  One big reason I wanted a homebirth this time.

 

Thanks so much :)

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilshower View Post

Thanks so much, Cole Deelah :)  This is really helpful and informative.

 

I have had a horrible experience with the midwife you mention having the most experience with.  And I really adore one of the other midwives.

I'm sorry to hear that! :(

 

 

Quote:
It is good to know that there are accidental water births :)  I can hope!

I just wish they would make it formal :)

 

 

Quote:
Also really great to know that I can benefit from a doula with this practice.  I'll definitely be getting one :)  Do you think that the midwife will be as attentive if I have a doula, as opposed to if I don't have a doula?  I really don't want to be ignored because I have a doula...  I kind of felt like I birthed with my doula last time, and I'm preferring to have my midwife a bit more present this time.

Nah, I don't think they will be with you less, just different. Kind of like a home birth midwife would. I'm there much earlier than she is and I take on the emotional and physical support so that she can focus on the mama and baby. As one midwife said 'doulas balance out the team', providing support for a mom and her partner, and making a midwife's job easier so that she can focus on mom and babies health. Together, doulas, midwives, and nurses make such an AWESOME support and safe space for mom and her partner.

 

 

Quote:
Wow, re the uptightness about co-sleeping.  My ped is crunchy, and I'm really hoping that he is on board with co-sleeping...  I hate postpartum at the hospital *so much* because I feel like I always have to fight with the nurses and be on such high alert about everything.  And I just want some peace with my new baby, you know...  And my dh is always busy with my other children.  One big reason I wanted a homebirth this time

Would an early release be an option for you? 12 hours?

.

post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks again, Cole Deelah :)

 

I really appreciate your insight re how the midwife/doula combination would work :)  This sounds much better than my last birth, where my mw basically depended on my doula to be everything for me except for the last 10-15 minutes...

 

I really don't get the uptightness re water birth.  The hospital where I had my last birth had been doing water birth for at least 20 years...

 

An early release would be an option for me.  I had a really hard time making that work with my last birth, tho. 

 

Thanks again :)

post #9 of 26
Have you consulted with a variety of midwives about your risks? I'm sure you've explored thoroughly, but I know that some MWs are more likely to risk out than others. I just hate for someone to want a home birth and not be able to get one! smile.gif I hope you'll find the perfect combination for your birth, either way. smile.gif
post #10 of 26

Reviving this :-) I am due early November and am going here. Has anyone else delivered here?

 

Also, the hospital allows food/drink in labor if you need it, but I wonder if the midwives allow it?

post #11 of 26

Thank you for reviving this. I've been meaning to post something similar, and it's so helpful to see the above exchange. I'm also planning to deliver with the midwives at TCH and had a home birth with my first. I would also love to have a home birth again, but it is not an option (for a number of reasons) this time. 

 

I'm also very curious to see what my experience will be like. April - have you had your baby yet? If so, would you mind sharing what happened?

 

Regarding the water birth question, the midwives and the TCH folks have been very clear in all of my contact with them that you can labor in the tub, but that birthing there is not an option. The woman giving the tour acted as though that would just be ridiculous. I'm not sure why they didn't just build birthing tubs and encourage it, though, since there are plenty of other hospitals (not in Houston), birthing center and home birth midwives that have been doing it for years, as stated above.

 

I haven't asked the co-sleeping in the hospital question, but agree that it's your baby and I don't plan to ask permission. I have heard that there are a limited number (one or two?) of double or queen sized beds available upon request that you and your partner can share. I imagine they wouldn't be shocked to see co-sleeping in that bed by this point.

 

Regarding whether the midwife will be there the whole time or not: at the "orientation" I attended, the mw stated that they are typically with you the entire time. However, as I've asked each mw about this, they all pretty much said that happens only if there are no other births happening at the same time. Based on what their waiting room looks like, I imagine there's pretty much always a couple folks in labor. That said, a friend of mine and his wife recently had their baby there and said that they would absolutely recommend using a doula, as the midwife was not available for much of the time (and to be fair, she may have been with the other woman/women exactly because they had a doula). His complaint, however, was that the nurse was not supportive of their natural birth plan, so much so that they asked her to leave and requested a different nurse, which was respected. He literally said that if they had not had a doula they both feel that she would not have succeeded at having a natural birth.

 

So, I agree that while the nurses may have received some doula training, that does not mean that they actually embraced it nor that they will actually serve as a doula. While there are certainly some awesome nurses out there that respect and support each patient's birth plan, I have to think that it's probably a lot easier on them when the mom is sitting neatly in bed chilled out with an epidural than a naturally laboring woman, and that that influences some nurses' behavior. 

 

I asked about food and drink during orientation, and the midwife said that they do support it. Glad to hear you've heard that TCH supports it too.

 

For my part, I will say that I have found prenatal care to be much, much more like that of an OB than my home birth midwife (I went to a few appointment initially with my first baby). Urine, weight, heartbeat, "any questions," see you later. Whereas, with my first midwife there was a lot of discussion about nutrition, exercise, sleep, how my partner should be supporting me, preparing emotionally for birth and baby, etc. I've found all the midwives that I've met so far fine, and liked some better than others. While it's great that they can presumably have a more normal lifestyle by being in a group practice, I've found it a little frustrating to have to re-tell my history five times and still not feel super supported and connected. I do feel tentatively confident (a bit of a paradox, I suppose), that the midwives will support me in the ways that I want during labor and delivery. I'm just not as confident in the TCH staff. 

 

I look forward to hearing about others' experiences with the midwives and TCH. Please share! 

post #12 of 26

amber: 1 of the midwives told me the same thing: They will be in and out depending on how many other deliveries there are, and the hospital nurses will be in and out as well. Interested to see how that will be.

 

Definitely similar to the OB model, which surprised me. The only exception was 1 of the midwives (don't know if we can say names on here?), who asked about what I was eating, and other detailed questions.

post #13 of 26
So sorry! I totally dropped off this discussion! How did everyone's births go? I found out I was pregnant shortly after this discussion started and recently had my baby girl.
post #14 of 26

Greetings all,

 

I meant to post a follow-up a while ago, but got busy with my newborn and two year old, as one does.

 

I delivered at Texas Children's in October with the midwives, and had a quite good experience. I spent most of my labor outside of the hospital, though. I arrived at triage after having labored for about four and half hours, and delivered an hour and a half later. By the time I got admitted, checked for progress, and told to head to a labor and delivery room I was already in transition. So I can't really speak to the experience of laboring there for much, but I was happy with the delivery.

 

I found my midwife to be very supportive, and willing to work with my requests. For example, I didn't want to be checked because I felt like knowing the number would mess with my head, but because it was a busy day she explained that she needed to be able to tell the staff how far along I was in order to get a labor and delivery room. Not ideal, but understandable for a hospital setting. I agreed to be checked, but asked her not to tell me the number, and that worked for us. My baby had meconium, so I didn't protest when the nurses whisked her away to be checked instead of being placed on my chest right away. She was given to me very quickly as soon as it was determined she was fine.

 

The post-partum experience was mostly great, too. The nurses were supportive; they offered help but weren't pushy. I was pretty clear with my requests to have as few visitors as possible, to not be woken up except for motrin, and that I didn't want to be checked. They were amenable to this. The hospital had a form for us to sign saying that we wouldn't co-sleep, and I signed it and moved on. 

 

The only complaints I have about the post-partum experience are these:

  • The rooms, while nice, were pretty cramped with all the stuff in there. We were putting the bassinet near the window, but realized that the A/C was blowing directly on the baby there, so we had to move it to the other side by the bathroom where it was kind of in the way. Not much they can do about that now, I guess.
  • The faucets in the bathroom sink had no temperature controls so it only provided cool water. I guess that's fine in order to prevent scalding, but cool water in a peri bottle in not very comfortable. I found myself turning on the shower to get warm water every time I went to the bathroom. Not ideal. When I mentioned it I was told that they are going to be changing it.  


I am now seeing the midwives for my regular care and continue to find them good providers. I had a number of conversations with them about my personal health concerns during the prenatal period and found their medical expertise and willingness to partner with me in my care quite reassuring. My connection with each of them improved as the frequency of my visits increased, and I felt good about those relationships by the time I was due. 

I think that's about it. I'll be happy to share other details if anyone has questions.

post #15 of 26

I will be delivering my twins there in June, with one of the OB's that work with the midwives. Seems the midwives are too booked to let anyone else in. Maybe this is a sign to have more midwives...call me crazy.

 

It will be very interesting to see how natural, unmedicated twin birth goes at the Women's Pavilion!

post #16 of 26

This is so helpful!  I'm delivering there in June too - but with one of the OBs.  Anyone requested exemption from the newborn "stuff" - Hep B, vit K, eye drops, etc...?  I've talked to my OB about it, and she is open but not thrilled, but I don't really want a fight at that moment, you know?

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by PartTimeCrunchy View Post

Maybe this is a sign to have more midwives...call me crazy.

 

 

Uh, yes, exactly! I don't understand why the hospitals just don't get it that increasing numbers of women of our generation want natural births, with a midwife supporting unless other medical intervention is required. If there's a huge demand for the midwives, add some! You'd think the other hospitals would see this and add a midwifery practice as well, yet no one else has yet. Seems like they're missing an opportunity for more business.

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by eriflegna View Post

This is so helpful!  I'm delivering there in June too - but with one of the OBs.  Anyone requested exemption from the newborn "stuff" - Hep B, vit K, eye drops, etc...?  I've talked to my OB about it, and she is open but not thrilled, but I don't really want a fight at that moment, you know?

 

My experience was that some of it (Hep B) depends on your pediatrician, and the other stuff (Vitamin K and eye drops) is all up to you advocating for your own medical decisions. The midwives told me they encourage Vitamin K because the baby could have internal bleeding that is not detected, but didn't argue with my choice. The eye drops is a whole other issue . . .

 

In the state of Texas, it is actually a law that medical professionals MUST administer the eye drops, or they are subject to a misdemeanor offense. Now, I seriously doubt a nurse, doctor or midwife has actually been charged with this crime, but there it is on the books (see below). The major problem with this, besides the fact that it violates medical ethics of informed consent, is that patients who don't want this or other procedures can file battery charges against a medical professional who administers a drug against his/her will (this is my understanding at least). So, nurses - who are usually the ones who give the drops, not doctors or midwives - are in a bit of a catch 22, and they generally will just try to persuade the patient to consent. The interesting thing to me is that the way that hospitals are dealing with this is by telling patients that it is the law to give the eye drops, and that if a parent does not consent, that the hospital must report them to CPS. As if it is the parent "breaking the law." I have no idea where they came up with this policy, as the legal statute does not indicate that would be the next step, but anecdotally, that's what happens at a lot of hospitals.

 

Personally, I refused the eye drops. I'm sure you've read up on it, as I did, and I felt confident that I was not putting my baby at risk. When I refused the drops, I did so matter-of-factly, simply saying I didn't want them (without apology). When the nurse said that she needed to give them, or something like that, I just said "no thanks," and moved on. She didn't push it. Later, she or someone else came by to explain that if we did not consent that the hospital would have to report us to CPS. I said that was fine. She said a social worker would be by to talk to me about it, but no one ever came by, and I have yet to hear from CPS. I know that CPS is a little too busy with a whole lot of actual abuse to bother with this stuff.

 

Good luck with your delivery and this issue! I found it to be no big deal.        

 

 

 

 

 

 


HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE


TITLE 2. HEALTH


SUBTITLE D. PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND REPORTS OF DISEASES


CHAPTER 81. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES


 

Sec. 81.091.  OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM PREVENTION; CRIMINAL PENALTY. (a) A physician, nurse, midwife, or other person in attendance at childbirth shall use or cause to be used prophylaxis approved by the board to prevent ophthalmia neonatorum.

(b)  A midwife is responsible for the administration of the prophylaxis to each infant the midwife delivers by:

(1)  administering the prophylaxis under standing delegation orders issued by a licensed physician; or

(2)  requiring the prophylaxis to be administered by an appropriately licensed and trained individual under standing delegation orders issued by a licensed physician.

(c)  Subject to the availability of funds, the department shall furnish prophylaxis approved by the board free of charge to:

(1)  health care providers if the newborn's financially responsible adult is unable to pay; and

(2)  a midwife identified under Chapter 203, Occupations Code, who requests prophylaxis for administration under standing delegation orders issued by a licensed physician under Subsection (b) and subject to the provisions of Subchapter A, Chapter 157, Occupations Code.

(d)  If a physician is not available to issue a standing delegation order or if no physician will agree to issue a standing delegation order, a midwife shall administer or cause to be administered by an appropriately trained and licensed individual prophylaxis approved by the Texas Board of Health to prevent ophthalmia neonatorum to each infant that the midwife delivers.

(e)  Administration and possession by a midwife of prophylaxis under this section is not a violation of Chapter 483.

(f)  A health care provider may not charge for prophylaxis received free from the department.

(g)  A person commits an offense if the person is a physician or other person in attendance on a pregnant woman either during pregnancy or at delivery and fails to perform a duty required by this section. An offense under this section is a Class B misdemeanor.

(h)  In this section, "financially responsible adult" means a parent, guardian, spouse, or any other person whom the laws of this state hold responsible for the debts incurred as a result of hospitalization or treatment.

Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 678, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1989. Amended by Acts 1991, 72nd Leg., ch. 158, Sec. 24, eff. Sept. 1, 1991; Acts 2001, 77th Leg., ch. 1420, Sec. 14.772, eff. Sept. 1, 2001.

post #19 of 26

Refusing Hep B is not really a problem.  You have to sign consent BEFORE administration.  We have never had a problem refusing vaxes at TCH.  I do not know about Vit K or eye oint.  I went in saying I did not want any of them, and then said OK to Vit K, which was my plan all along.  The nurses felt like they had won on the Vit K issue, so dropped the other issue.  It also helps that I have a documented allergy to erythromycin, the abx in the eye goop.  Hard to get them to rationalize endangering my life....

post #20 of 26

My son was born at St. Luke's in January 2012. I started out with the midwives and really enjoyed most of them. They each took the time to talk with me about any concerns and questions I had. I risked out of their care around 35 weeks due to uncontrolled gestational diabetes. Theodora personally selected an OB for me based on how compatible she thought we'd be. I started seeing Dr. Espana and he is amazing! I had to be induced unfortunately, but the nurses and Dr. E supported me in whatever I wanted. They allowed me to push in whatever position I wanted, even with an epidural (back labor was so difficult along with pitocin). Anyhow, I ended with an emergency c-section since my son was posterior, asynclitic and partially transverse. His heart rate started sky rocketing during pushing so Dr. E said he though a c-section was best. He kept apologizing that my birth wasn't how I wanted. I was just grateful to be respected the entire time. As soon as he came to see me after the delivery, and at every appointment since, he tells me that I am an excellent VBAC candidate and he will do everything in his power to help me make that happen.

Sorry for the novel, I was just thoroughly impressed with everyone involved in my prenatal care and L&D experience. Even though things turned out exactly opposite of what I wanted, they all supported and respected me. Oh at one appointment, the MWs gave me a list of doulas in the area and even gave me some info on the ones that they worked with. We also had zero issues co-sleeping in the hospital. My husband even co-slept with the baby and they didn't say a word. The LC taught me the football hold and how to nurse side-lying. I realize they may not be as natural friendly as MWs in other cities or states, but I really think as a whole the MWs, Dr. E and the nursing staff really do try and care. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Welcome to Mothering! › Connect With Other Moms › Moms In Your Area › Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico › Birthing at Texas Children's Pavilion for Women with Women's Specialists mws