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S/o lying

post #1 of 83
Thread Starter 

This is a spin off.  Posts 134 and 135 of this thread:  

 

http://www.mothering.com/community/t/1352217/vaccine-safety-curriculum-for-medical-residents-american-academy-of-pediatrics/120.

 

What do you think of lying when it comes to vaccine issues?

 

Example:

 

Mother claims religious exemption to get her child into school without vaccinating - although their family is not religious, and religious issue played no or a minor role in the decision.

 

Medical doctor or school board (I have personal experience with that one) makes it seem like the child must be vaccinated to attend school - when that is not the case.  Let's assume this is not done out of ignorance, but a deliberate wording to try and get people to vaccinate. 

 

I can think of numerous other examples of lying or misrepresentation of facts.

 

What do you think?  Is lying ever justifiable in vaccine situations?  When?  

 

(now I am sure some people are going to come on and say it is justifiable, but only when my side does it, lol lol.gif)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 83

As from the other post, Do all states allow exemptions from school entry requirements?

Answer: Some states only allow medical exemptions. A minority allow exemption based on personal belief.

This type of thing really makes me mad. I am not asking pedi what he thinks of vaccines, what are the risk/benefit, his view of the matter, how we should vax DC, etc. 
It is a question asking for simple fact answer, and there should be no subjective answer - Yes, all states have exemptions for school entry. 2 states only have medical exemption. All the rest have religious and some have religious and philosophical exemptions. It would be more helpful to truthfully report the exemption possibilities in the state the patient is in.

 

The answer provided here is full of agenda and is misleading. Nothing is "untrue" however. I would instantly leave a pedi who answered me like this. I would never trust him/her on anything again, especially vax/vpd related.

 

On the flip side, one "lie" I see around anti-vax stuff that drives me nuts is the claim that there are aborted fetal cells in vaccines. 

There are cell fragments, proteins and DNA from cell lines cultivated from aborted fetuses but no, there are no original cells from fetus. DNA is still that of the fetus though. Not making the distinction seems sloppy to me and going for shock value.


Edited by slmommy - 5/5/12 at 12:50pm
post #3 of 83

If my only option to keep my kids in school and unvaccinated was to lie about religion, then I would strongly consider it.  I don't think there are many parents who wouldn't lie to keep their kids healthy as they see necessary. 

 

Religion doesn't even have to be about faith in God or a specific church sect.  Believing in one set of values from one faith is religion.  If a parent believes that their unvaccinated child is how nature intended him to be, that should be that parent's right, regardless of what faith they ascribe to.

 

Bodily integrity is not just about cutting.

post #4 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post

If my only option to keep my kids in school and unvaccinated was to lie about religion, then I would strongly consider it.  I don't think there are many parents who wouldn't lie to keep their kids healthy as they see necessary. 

 

Religion doesn't even have to be about faith in God or a specific church sect.  Believing in one set of values from one faith is religion.  If a parent believes that their unvaccinated child is how nature intended him to be, that should be that parent's right, regardless of what faith they ascribe to.

 

Bodily integrity is not just about cutting.

 

Yes! I am not a religious person. But something about the constant medical assumption that the human body is deeply flawed, incapable, or simply wrong offends me on a spiritual note.

For that reason I would not have a problem filing a religious exemption if need be. Maybe it is more appropriate to philosophical, but when that option doesn't exist?? vax, convert, or move??

post #5 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by slmommy View Post

 

Yes! I am not a religious person. But something about the constant medical assumption that the human body is deeply flawed, incapable, or simply wrong offends me on a spiritual note.

For that reason I would not have a problem filing a religious exemption if need be. Maybe it is more appropriate to philosophical, but when that option doesn't exist?? vax, convert, or move??

 

I completely agree.  I live in California and my children have personal beliefs exemptions.  I think the distinction between philosophical and religious reasons are merely semantics, but the terms are used as roadblocks to getting any exemption.  Even with the personal beliefs exemption, I've had to talk to the nurse at my kids' school district and have her talk down to me and treat me like I'm an uneducated parent before I can sign the exemption (which frankly, I don't see how that's legal, given that it's my right to have a personal exemption, and her authority is pretty much insignificant in terms of my decision).

 

I've had to do this for both children, separately, and the 3 different schools they have been enrolled at, plus I get to look forward to doing it again next week when enrolling my son in his 3rd school in the district (1 for pre-k, 1 for k, and a different one for 1st grade since we recently moved elementary districts).  The nurse backs down a little when I tell her that our ped. has encouraged me not to continue vaxes after my son's reaction. (I do plan on asking him about getting a medical exemption.)

post #6 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post

If my only option to keep my kids in school and unvaccinated was to lie about religion, then I would strongly consider it.  I don't think there are many parents who wouldn't lie to keep their kids healthy as they see necessary. 

 

Religion doesn't even have to be about faith in God or a specific church sect.  Believing in one set of values from one faith is religion.  If a parent believes that their unvaccinated child is how nature intended him to be, that should be that parent's right, regardless of what faith they ascribe to.

 

Bodily integrity is not just about cutting.

 

I would probably lie if I had to.  Thankfully I live in a place where I can easily get a philosophical exemption.  Some places in Canada are even better - no exemption required!  (and the sky has not fallen in - nor do those places have higher amounts of VPDs AFAIK) 

 

I do not really have an issue with lying over unjust regulations (and I do consider it unjust).  

 

 

 

I suspect (and would love to hear from some pro-vaxxers on this) that the reason some in the medical community  words things like this:

 

"Do all states allow exemptions from school entry requirements?
Answer: Some states only allow medical exemptions. A minority allow exemption based on personal belief."

 

….is because they believe very firmly that vaccination is best for almost everyone, so giving slanted, half answers is acceptable.  

 

I do not think this is acceptable for this reason:

 

Even if the medical community believes vaccination is for the best, those beliefs do not supersede parental authority or informed consent.  How can a person make an informed decision if the threat of not being able to send their child to school looms over their head?

 

As per the religion thing - I sort of hear you.  There is a spiritual element to the more holistic model of healthcare I embrace.  None-the-less, if I were to quantify my reasons for not vaccinating, I know that spirituality plays a small role.  Statistics on VPDs versus vaccine side effects plays the biggest role.


Edited by purslaine - 5/5/12 at 2:34pm
post #7 of 83

When your child's health, and perhaps life, is possibly in danger (such as when a pediatrican insists that a child with a previous vaccine reaction, or a child with a fever be vaccinated that day), I think a lot of parents would lie to save their child.

 

If you were Jewish, and a bunch of skin-head Neo-Nazis cornered you and your child and asked you were Jewish, wouldn't you lie?

post #8 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post

If you were Jewish, and a bunch of skin-head Neo-Nazis cornered you and your child and asked you were Jewish, wouldn't you lie?

This could very easily be an offensive comment to many practicing Jews & really has no place here.
post #9 of 83

I just wanted to point out that I don't think that "answer" was for parents.  This was part of a "small group discussion" for residents. See page 6 for context.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/65685830/Small-Group-Guide

post #10 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbyGrant View Post

I just wanted to point out that I don't think that "answer" was for parents.  This was part of a "small group discussion" for residents. See page 6 for context.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/65685830/Small-Group-Guide

Thanks, this document has a lay out that is a bit easier to understand than the link in the other thread, I see what you mean. 

 

However, there are still numerous "challenge the parent" lines I take issue with in a similar manner.

post #11 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post


This could very easily be an offensive comment to many practicing Jews & really has no place here.

Excuse me, but I AM a practicing Jew.

post #12 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post

Excuse me, but I AM a practicing Jew.

Fine, but that certainly Doesn't mean that you speak for an entire religion. I still find your statement offensive and inappropriate.
post #13 of 83
My point is that when the safety of a child is threatened by the belief of others who wield power, most parents would feel they have no choice but to lie.

I gave an example of that situation. There was nothing offensive about that example. It's a situation that happened in Skokie, IL in the 1970's, which is not so long ago.
post #14 of 83
Very few people should e claiming medical exemptions, Christian scientists, but I'm not sure who else.  Most people who claim them are lying.  You can view the doctors answer as misleading or you can view it as they left the religious exemptions off because they apply to very few people.

I would not lie about it, but I find lying abhorrent and wouldn't want to set that example for my kids.  Please don't think I'm saying anyone here is abhorrent, that's not at all what I mean I know you feel like you have very good reasons, it's just my personal belief.  

If I felt that strongly about not vaccinating I wouldn't vaccinate, either, but I would find a way to get my child in private school or homeschool.

I am a rather religious person, so maybe I'm bothered a little extra when I see friends who I know are atheists claiming religious exemptions, idk.

As a Christian, do not speaking for Jews, if someone cornered me and asked me if I was. Christian and said they'd shoot me if I was, I hope I would have the courage to say yes.  We have lots of biblical examples to teach us that is what's expected.
post #15 of 83

Ok... I think this thread is on the brink of a pretty ugly turn, so I'm not going to further what I see happening.

 

Do private schools not need exemptions? I thought that was the same as public school? I believe there is legislation in CA which would require even homeschoolers to have exemptions?

 

Everytime I bring up that I feel there are not adequate exemption possibilities, especially for those who want to selectively vax - like skip cp or hpv... people state that there are adequate possibilities. I don't see how forcing a family to move and/or undergo possible financial hardship through loss of parental income to homeschool as a practical solution for parents who do not wish to vaccinate, or worse, just don't want to vaccinate for chicken pox!

This is not informed consent.

post #16 of 83

They didn't leave religious exemptions off. That question and answer are just one point in a broader discussion. It's really hard to cut and paste from this document for some reason, but if you go to page 6, you can see that questions like "What are the school entry requirements in your state?," "Can parents avoid immunizations required for school entry on the basis of a religious exemption?," "Can parents avoid immunizations required for school entry on the basis of a personal belief exemption?" are part of the discussion. 

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/65685830/Small-Group-Guide

post #17 of 83

Abby, I think you are right about this document, the formatting of the original link kinda messed with how I understood it.

 

I don't think it is outside of the realm of possibilities though, that a parents ask a pedi and be told they can only get an exemption if they belong to a religion against medical procedures like vaccination.

 

Religious exemptions are not widely understood, many people don't believe they could file one when indeed they can.

 

No shots = No school is a popular misconception.

post #18 of 83

       Quote:

Originally Posted by slmommy View Post

 

I don't think it is outside of the realm of possibilities though, that a parents ask a pedi and be told they can only get an exemption if they belong to a religion against medical procedures like vaccination.

 

Religious exemptions are not widely understood, many people don't believe they could file one when indeed they can.

 

No shots = No school is a popular misconception.

 

Religious exemptions vary by area, so in some cases a doctor may not be wrong if they stated that. I've heard in NY, especially NYC, it's pretty difficult to get a religious exemption. Also, it's really outside the scope of being a doctor to have full knowledge of all possible school exemptions other than medical. I would not look to my pediatrician for information about that. Of course they shouldn't lie about it if they do know or give out inaccurate information.

 

edited to fix typo


Edited by AbbyGrant - 5/6/12 at 9:51am
post #19 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbyGrant View Post

       Quote:

 

Religious exemptions vary by area, so in some cases a doctor may not be wrong if they stated that. I've heard in NY, especially NYC, it's pretty difficult to get a religious exemption. Also, it's really outside the scope of being a doctor to have full knowledge of all possible school exemptions other then medical. I would not look to my pediatrician for information about that. Of course they shouldn't lie about it if they do know or give out inaccurate information.

I think the above would be more likely that outright lying.  Also, I would find it more disturbing when a person lies while in a professional capacity.  The cornered-person analogy isn't a great parallel.  The better parallel would be someone in an official capacity asking a possibly damning question to someone who has come for assistance or because the law requires it.  I'm sure you can think of your own examples.

 

As an individual, and a mother, I would have no problem lying if I think the system is being unreasonable.  I jaywalk when there are no cars.  I refuse to pass conviction for laws I personally feel are unjust.  I have no problem with committing these technical infractions.  I *would* lie if I felt I had no better option.  In a professional capacity, I don't lie, wouldn't lie.  In those cases I represent something larger than myself, especially if I was in the position of a doctor or nurse on whom people rely.  If I disagreed with something, I might say that within context of the facts.

 

Agree or disagree with this distinction?

post #20 of 83
I guess I consider financial hardship, etc, part of being a parent. If it was really important to me that my child learned about creationism only and not evolution, for example, I wouldn't expect the school to change to suit me, I would take it upon myself to homeschool or find a school that fit my needs. I don't think theres an expectation that public school works for everyone. 

I also expect public health policy to reflect what the bulk of mainstream science tells us, which is that vaccines are safe, effective, and help stop the spread of various diseases. If a school is faced with the choice of having a student body vaccinated with chicken pox so that a kid comes to school they only infect 4-5 others or the choice to NOT vaccinate, in which case half the students might be out for a week or more with pox, it seems like the more sound policy and education choice is clear. That is obviously not the same decision making process you go through as a parent, though.

I think private schools get to make their own decisions about vaccines, but I'm not really sure and it could certainly vary from state to state. 
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