or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Vaccinations Debate › Vaccine Link request, if possible
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Vaccine Link request, if possible

post #1 of 81
Thread Starter 

I had heard more than once @ 2 years ago when I was on Facebook that the percent of adults vaccinated in America was @ 2%. I have not been able to find any valid links, and I am sure the % has since changed, but I was wondering if any of you who are more knowledgable have also heard of this? Does anyone have any links? (The CDC website proved to be confusing and I question their data for some reason, but any links should be helpful.)

 

The argument that people often use to debate with me is usually about "Herd immunity", but from what I understand herd immunity does not exist if the adult population is not also vaccinated. (If I am wrong about that please fill me in.) The closest link I have found that states statistics is this one, (which happens to be pro-vaccine):

 

http://news.idsociety.org/idsa/issues/2010-02-01/index.html

 

"Only 2.1 percent of eligible adults have had the tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine in the previous two years, the report notes, while only 10 percent of eligible adult women have had the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Just 36 percent of all adults were vaccinated against influenza in 2008."

 

 

Thanks in advance

post #2 of 81

Definitely a reminder to check what boosters I should get at my next Doctors appointment. It's all too easy to forget about these things if not reminded - that's why routine childhood vaccinations are so important in my opinion. 

post #3 of 81
Most diseases that we have childhood vaccines for don't need boosters. So even though adults tend to neglect boosters we still have heard immunity for these diseases. Other diseases, like tetanus, the idea of herd immunity doesn't really apply to. For things like pertussis herd immunity isn't really established very well in some parts of the country, hence the outbreaks and the recent push for more adults to get boosters.
post #4 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

Most diseases that we have childhood vaccines for don't need boosters. So even though adults tend to neglect boosters we still have heard immunity for these diseases. Other diseases, like tetanus, the idea of herd immunity doesn't really apply to. For things like pertussis herd immunity isn't really established very well in some parts of the country, hence the outbreaks and the recent push for more adults to get boosters.

So this idea of "herd immunity" comes with the assumtion that the adults were either: vaccinated at one time, OR they got the disease and recovered in order to be immune?

post #5 of 81
Yes. Herd immunity requires most people are immune one way or another.
Edited by Rrrrrachel - 5/16/12 at 3:07pm
post #6 of 81
Erinsuzy, Try this: http://www.healthyamericans.org/assets/files/TFAH2010AdultImmnzBrief13.pdf The report is from 2010, so it makes sense that you saw the news two years ago on FB. Scroll down to the second page for all of the data that you mentioned, which was compiled by the CDC in 2007 and is referenced in the report. HTH!
post #7 of 81

OP - this article speaks to some thoughts about herd immunity and adult population

 

http://www.thenhf.com/article.php?id=1975

post #8 of 81
There is no such thing as forced vaccination in the united states. Even in Mississippi.
post #9 of 81
I don't believe it's tue that "most vaccines" lose their effectiveness after 2-10 years. I would like to see the information he's basing that statement on.

He's also using radically different numbers for effectiveness than I've ever seen. 30-40%? Where's that coming from?
post #10 of 81

Not gonna argue with you Rrrrrachel, just providing OP with a link that was possibly the one she was looking for.

 

Meningococcal vaxes are what? 3-5, 4-6 years? Off top of my head, maybe wrong? Tetanus 10 years? cp, who knows, 10ish I've heard? MMR, 1 used to be lifetime, now it is 2 doses, and it seems sometimes pregnant women discover their rubella immunity has worn off so they get re-vaxed after birth...

Another CHOP page puts teens and adults as major Pertussis players, so their vaccines either didn't work well or have worn off.

Pertussis vax has been around since 1940's? I think? 

 

Quote:
Pertussis is unusual in that most children catch the disease from adults and not from other children....
Pertussis is common in teenagers and adults. 
post #11 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

There is no such thing as forced vaccination in the united states. Even in Mississippi.

Wrong.  My second child was vaccinated in the hospital, against written directions in his chart, and without my permission.

 

That is forced vaccination.

 

So is this:  http://www.wnd.com/2012/03/state-confiscates-newborn-over-vaccinations/

post #12 of 81

This sounds like forced vaccination to me too.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/1119/p02s04-ussc.html

"In one of the strongest stands in the US, Prince George's County, Md., orders parents to immunize their children or risk up to 10 days in jail."

post #13 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post

This sounds like forced vaccination to me too.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/1119/p02s04-ussc.html

"In one of the strongest stands in the US, Prince George's County, Md., orders parents to immunize their children or risk up to 10 days in jail."

WOW...  that is horrible. Where have our rights gone?

They don't seem to care enough about reactions, or else they wouldn't give so many at a time. We still don't know which of the 6 vaccinations my son received (at 2 months old) caused his terrible reaction.

 

Thanks for the links everyone. The reason I was looking into this is because someone was telling me that if it wasn't for vaccines, we would have disease "run rampid" everywhere. There really is not enough evidence to prove that. For ex. That CDC percentage of unvaccinated adults (link above) data compiled in 2007, says:

"2.1 percent of eligible adults (18 to 64 years old) had the tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough vaccine in the previous two years"

So then we are left the other 97% of adults that we don't know how many are just plain unvaccinated and which have immunity to tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough.

And if it is true what the Doctor says in this other link above http://www.thenhf.com/article.php?id=1975 that "at least 50% or more of the population was unprotected for decades" then the Herd immunity theory would be a myth and there would NOT be disease run rampid.

I can also see where this person got this fearful idea now, the same CDC pamplet claims that "vaccinations prevent @ 10.5 million cases of infectious illness a year and 33,000 deaths", but when you look at the source they give one person's name: "F. Zhou" at a 2003 Pediatric Conference....  (and there was no Dr. in front of the name). I think with numbers that large, we need more than this one person's theory. There needs to be more done for the concerned parents who are trapped under pressure between risks, yet we are treated like we are tossing around conspiracy theories or that we "don't care about the population" (I am not talking about here, just in general by the meaner folks). We are frowned upon for even questioning it at the Doctors office or elsewhere, like we are supposed to offer up our children like sacrificial guinea pigs and not cause a stink about it. Do you guys even realize how many parents are scared to death before they take their little ones into the doctor? I won't even get into it...    NO ONE knows how their babies are going to react...  NOT A SINGLE ONE. It is like Russian Roulette- who is going to be next, and if your kid is the lucky one then you get breath a sigh of relief while some other parent is left crying and questioning themselves and the decision they made. This is sad that we are put in this situation, really sad. Sorry for the rant...  I am just really burnt out.

 

disappointed.gif

post #14 of 81

Rick Perry wanted to mandate Gardasil for school girls in Texas, 2007. Thank goodness his attempt failed.

 

Erinsuzy, I feel your frustration!  How do you know if your newborn/infant is allergic to an ingredient in a vaccine? Well, just inject them and wait to find out. That's how it's done, and it can't be wrong, because everyone does it.

post #15 of 81
How do you know if your kid is allergic to nuts? Or eggs? Or penecillin?
post #16 of 81

That question does not answer my original question. If anything, it validates it!

Injecting a newborn/infant (or feeding a newborn/infant) with potential allergens, could result in an  allergic response. With feeding, if there is a response, it is a bit easier to determine the cause. If there is a reaction after a vaccine, it is often difficult to prove (with our current medical system)--especially when the majority of health professionals would deny any connection to the vaccine. If the response does not happen immediately, within the office, then you're out of luck buddy!

post #17 of 81

Most parents are recommended to introduce new foods one at a time and monitor the reaction. Not with vaccines. Just inject lots of ingredients and hope nothing bad happens. How scientific!

post #18 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeckyBird View Post

Most parents are recommended to introduce new foods one at a time and monitor the reaction. Not with vaccines. Just inject lots of ingredients and hope nothing bad happens. How scientific!

 

And even then, it's not recommended to start until after 6 months (4 at the earliest) because the gut isn't ready for food before then!

post #19 of 81
I don't thi that's a fair characterization. I think if your child had a classic allergic reaction after a vaccine it would be fairly easy to get a doctor to acknowledge it. I agree it may be more difficult to convince them something more obscure was caused by an allergy, but have you ever tried to convince a doctor that a food allergy or intolerance was causing bad behavior? It's nearly impossible. The two seem pretty comparable, to me.
post #20 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

I don't thi that's a fair characterization. I think if your child had a classic allergic reaction after a vaccine it would be fairly easy to get a doctor to acknowledge it.

 

This would be logical, but we know that rarely happens.  I know you don't believe in anecdotes, but several members have posted that their child's severe vaccine reaction were ignored by their doctor or blamed on something else.

 

Babies have died the day after getting shots and doctors call it SIDS.  Anything but a vaccine reaction, because those hardly ever happen, right?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Vaccinations Debate
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Baby Health › Vaccinations › Vaccinations Debate › Vaccine Link request, if possible