or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm... - Page 2

post #21 of 112
No precautions taken here unless a friend informs us that their child has allergies. My kids' daycare is peanut free so I just avoid sending those products in.
post #22 of 112

We do not consume peanuts or peanut products in public. If it is eaten at home then I wash up all the kids, (face and hands) before leaving the house. I had two friends with severely peanut allergic children IRL and several more online friends, they lived in constant fear of peanuts. It gave me a healthy fear of what my actions and my feeding of my children can do to another family. One of the boys ended up in the hospital several times as a toddler after encountering accidental peanuts while out and about. It go to the point where the mom felt that they could not leave the house, even a day at the outdoor playground, could have him running into a roaming 2 year with a PB and J sandwich in one hand while going down the slide. To me, looking in at their life, it seemed like a lonely prison to be in because they could not control others. 

 

We have had two peanut allergic children at our small private school. One was more severe then the other where anything made for the class had to be labeled peanut free, the other just could just not ingest peanuts. I feel very fortunate that while my DD2 has significant allergies that trigger her asthma, it is all animal, environmental allergies. While I still can not control it, it is not quite like a peanut allergy where you need an epipen.

post #23 of 112

Chiming in as the parent of a severely food-allergic child. 

 

My child is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts as well as eggs and fish and sesame and a whole host of other foods, but she is most severely allergic to wheat. She is anaphylactic, contact allergic, airway allergic. 

 

Life for us means being hyper-vigilant ALL THE TIME. If dd's friend has a bag of goldfish, they can't sit next to each other on the bus. At the playground, she knows to stay away from kids who are eating (there are always a ton), and she knows she needs to ask her friends to wipe their hands if they want to share toys or something. She cannot eat restaurant food at all, ever, but if we take her with us to a restaurant, we wipe down her seat and table area first. I never order sandwiches or burgers or things that are eaten with the hands, so they I can make sure my hands stay clean to help her with her meal. If we notice a kid eating a bagel or something before dance class, I will try to get the kid a wipe; if I'm not able to intervene, dd needs to remember that she can't hold that girl's hand in class. We take public transportation to and from school. Don't even get me started on what people eat in crowded buses and subways. She has to clean her hands before she puts anything in her mouth. If dh or I or her grandparents eat wheat, we need to wash our hands and wipe our mouths before we touch or kiss her. And what I'm describing here is really just the tip of the iceberg.

 

I appreciate it when strangers don't bring nuts to the park and when they wipe their children's hands after they eat. But I don't expect it. Nor does avoiding peanuts in public necessarily mean that you are keeping other kids safe (peanut butter and goldfish crackers are both dangerous to my kid, but the crackers are much more so). Personally, we try to be mindful in public. If dd wants a snack at the park, she sits on a bench and I wipe her hands afterward. It's safer for her, but it's also safer for the kid who's allergic to corn or dairy or whatever she's eating. Cleaning your kids after they eat (washing their hands or wiping hands and face with WetOnes) and trying to keep food in places where food is expected (e.g., at the picnic table and not on the slide) are FAR more important steps to take, I think, than not eating nuts in public.

 

However, food has become ubiquitous in American society. I expect that allergens will be everywhere, because they are.

post #24 of 112
Quote:
 Cleaning your kids after they eat (washing their hands or wiping hands and face with WetOnes) and trying to keep food in places where food is expected (e.g., at the picnic table and not on the slide) are FAR more important steps to take

 

 

it's a bit meaningless when you see a squirrel caring a nut on piece of playground equipment and watching them drop it and pick it back up and crack it open

 

 

personally I do not use wetones and am far more concerned about the over use of chemical products on children

 

 

 

I delt with a neighbor boy (age 4 to 13 at the time), 25 years ago when NO one had peanut issues- he was allergic to everything and only ate rice and turkey with water for years, could use his own pen at age 5- he grew out of all but the peanuts........as a child things were really easy, as an adult he as found kissing to be a real problem! contact even hours later is a problem for him- doesn't stop with children at playgrounds

post #25 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

 

 

it's a bit meaningless when you see a squirrel caring a nut on piece of playground equipment and watching them drop it and pick it back up and crack it open

 

 

personally I do not use wetones and am far more concerned about the over use of chemical products on children

 

 

 

I delt with a neighbor boy (age 4 to 13 at the time), 25 years ago when NO one had peanut issues- he was allergic to everything and only ate rice and turkey with water for years, could use his own pen at age 5- he grew out of all but the peanuts........as a child things were really easy, as an adult he as found kissing to be a real problem! contact even hours later is a problem for him- doesn't stop with children at playgrounds

No, it's not meaningless. The more parents keep food away from play equipment--ALL food, not just nuts--the safer it is for food-allergic children. Children leave far more food residue on playground equipment than squirrels. Perfectly clean spaces are an impossibility; no one understands that more than I. (Did you even read my post? I said that playgrounds are only a tiny fraction of what I deal with on a daily basis AND I said that totally clean public spaces are an impossibility.)

 

But the OP wanted to know what people do and I can tell you as the parent of a severely food-allergic kid that cleaning your kids and keeping food away from non-food areas are the most important things that you can do. Splash a little water on your kids' hands and dry with a paper towel if you don't want to use WetOnes.

 

I wish I had the luxury not to use wet wipes, because I'm not thrilled with the chemicals either, but unfortunately I have to be a little more concerned about my kid dying than I am about what's in the wipes. 

post #26 of 112
Quote:

Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post

 

But the OP wanted to know what people do and I can tell you as the parent of a severely food-allergic kid that cleaning your kids and keeping food away from non-food areas are the most important things that you can do. Splash a little water on your kids' hands and dry with a paper towel if you don't want to use WetOnes.

 

 



I really get what you are saying. I think it is gross when kids run around with food at parks any way -- eating with dirty hands and dropping their food and picking it back up. I'm not sure what the big deal is about stopping playing long enough to eat.

 

It's not that big of a deal to wipe kids off before they eat. Wiping them off again afterwards to make the world a little safer for some one else's child seems like a small thing to ask.

 

I never really thought about it before, but now that I have, I can't see just blowing off the information. If you have no way of cleaning your child's hands, why are they eating anyway? What's the big deal about repeating what you did before the meal right after the meal?

 

And if you don't bother to clean your child's hands before they eat, ick. shake.gif

post #27 of 112
Quote:

 

 

And if you don't bother to clean your child's hands before they eat, ick. shake.gif

 

Hmmm. The only time i really suggest hand washing before eating is if my kids have actual dirt or crud on their hands, like if they were digging around in the sandbox or something like that. But if they were playing at a playground and i called them over for a snack? Nope, it wouldnt even cross my mind unless there was visible dirt on their hands (and only because dirt doesnt seem yummy.) I dont generally wash my hands before eating either unless there are special circumstances (going out to eat right after picking through stuff at the thrift store or used bookstore, i usually feel kinda grimy after that).....and all of us are usually pretty healthy.

 

Thats not to say we dont wash our hands, i def. encourage it after using the bathroom for instance....but before snacktime at the park? No, and it would never occur to me that would be "icky".

post #28 of 112
If you don't use wet-ones then perhaps a damp washcloth in a plastic baggie? This is what my ex usually does and it works really well. (sorry, can't quote easily from my phone)
post #29 of 112
Quote:

Hmmm. The only time i really suggest hand washing before eating is if my kids have actual dirt or crud on their hands, like if they were digging around in the sandbox or something like that. But if they were playing at a playground and i called them over for a snack? Nope, it wouldnt even cross my mind unless there was visible dirt on their hands (and only because dirt doesnt seem yummy.) I dont generally wash my hands before eating either unless there are special circumstances (going out to eat right after picking through stuff at the thrift store or used bookstore, i usually feel kinda grimy after that).....and all of us are usually pretty healthy.

 

Thats not to say we dont wash our hands, i def. encourage it after using the bathroom for instance....but before snacktime at the park? No, and it would never occur to me that would be "icky".

me either!

 

 

there are sooooooooo many place at a playground/park, etc and no way would I do so

 

 

this world was not meant to be sterile, I do not want it nor feel it is healthy-an immune systems was designed to work, I want my child to have the chance, it seems to be getting smaller, but I still want dirt and exposures, that does include known allergens

 

 

 

I don't buy this- people have been eating in park, regardless if you don't allow food near the equipment- it is meaningless! The "stick" the child with a peanut-butter sandwich had is a great toy and most times they go for that to- get what I mean?

 

I don't know who touched what prior to me being there anymore than I know who touched the organic fruit at a local co-op- so to push this-IMO is just like saying "taking one for the heard" - NO I do not want my child in a sterile environment, I do not feel it is healthy for my child all the uses of "wet-one" and hand sanitizers, does my child count or only those with allergies?  BTW- we avoid (and have no alleges) inside playgrounds because of this- I don't want my child exposed to the cleaning chemicals (OVERKILL- IMO!!) and all the people cleaning their children's hands with sanitizers.

 

IF you knowing know that is different (person coming to your house, bringing an item, etc), to expect others to conform-NO.

 

You can not protect every situation and expecting others to IMO is not where your focus should be- this "heard" is not the majority.

 

 

 

Quote:
No, it's not meaningless. The more parents keep food away from play equipment--ALL food, not just nuts--the safer it is for food-allergic children. Children leave far more food residue on playground equipment than squirrels. Perfectly clean spaces are an impossibility; no one understands that more than I. (Did you even read my post? I said that playgrounds are only a tiny fraction of what I deal with on a daily basis AND I said that totally clean public spaces are an impossibility.)

You have lots of expectation of others and I see no regard for my child's immune system -why are you trying to control others?

 

Bees are a allergen to some- guess that is a good thing they are dying off.

post #30 of 112

I grew up with a sibling with severe peanut allergies.  We didn't make peanut butter cookies in the house because my sister could smell it and start to  have breathing problems.  We had peanut butter for sandwhiches but would go outside to eat them usually if she was home and if you want  peanut butter and jelly you had to put the knife in the jelly first so you wouldn't contaminate it.  Other than that, it was mainly the eating out that was the problem, with food being accidently contaminated.  Twice we had to take her to the ER after eating out.  We'd have to make speical arrangements if we flew to make sure there were no peanuts given out on the plane.  We were homeschooled, so didn't have the school issue, but all our friends knew and were careful not to share food with peanuts.  I don't think I'd be freaking out that much about what my kids are eating before they see friends. Unless you can see it on the clothes or faces/hands I think you are probably fine.

 

I've been paranoid with my own kids (who do have some egg/milk issues) and waited till they were well over two to let them try something with peanut, and they are fine. I now have a much younger brother who has the nut allergy as well.  It's a scary thing, but at least now there are epi-pens parents carry around, etc. 

post #31 of 112

I would also no sooner go up to the grandfather pushing a swing and ask if he washed his hands or would.

 

I think wanting people to do so is far beyond what is expectable in a park or anyplace.

 

I certainly hope we don't see the day we are asked not to eat in public places because of fear. You have just as many potential food allergies issues in almost every place regardless if you see food or not.

post #32 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

I really get what you are saying. I think it is gross when kids run around with food at parks any way -- eating with dirty hands and dropping their food and picking it back up. I'm not sure what the big deal is about stopping playing long enough to eat.
Some kids eat better while on the move or literally won't sit still to eat... especially when there's a playground a few feet away. I have friends that get very anxious if their kid hasn't eaten much and would rather see their kids eat while playing than not eat at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenjane View Post

Hmmm. The only time i really suggest hand washing before eating is if my kids have actual dirt or crud on their hands, like if they were digging around in the sandbox or something like that. But if they were playing at a playground and i called them over for a snack? Nope, it wouldnt even cross my mind unless there was visible dirt on their hands (and only because dirt doesnt seem yummy.) I dont generally wash my hands before eating either unless there are special circumstances (going out to eat right after picking through stuff at the thrift store or used bookstore, i usually feel kinda grimy after that).....and all of us are usually pretty healthy.

Thats not to say we dont wash our hands, i def. encourage it after using the bathroom for instance....but before snacktime at the park? No, and it would never occur to me that would be "icky".
This is us, too. We never wash our hands at the park because there's usually not a bathroom nearby and I just don't see the big deal about a bit of dirt -- the research I've seen has actually suggested it may even be beneficial. DS is one of the healthiest kids I know so I certainly don't think it's been a detriment to him! We wash hands after using the bathroom or after touching something really gross/sticky/germy/whatever but not just as a routine part of eating.

I would definitely do whatever I needed to do to accommodate a friend or acquaintance with food allergies (whether mild or severe). I have moderate allergies myself and I know that sense of panic in high-risk situations, though I can't pretend to fully understand the daily life of someone with really severe allergies like NYCVeg deals with. However, I've never met anyone in real life with allergies that severe, and I can't go around structuring my life on the off chance I might come across someone... no more than I can prepare for various other harmful but uncommon scenarios. Plus, I know my child, I know that he spends more time clinging to me than anything else, he keeps his distance from kids he doesn't know (and even kids he does) so I'm not particularly concerned about him running up to a kid at the park and exposing him/her to deadly allergens.

I do make sure to ask around about allergies before pulling a highly-allergenic food out of my bag around a group of strangers, and avoid bringing peanuts to places like the children's museum even though they are not a nut-free facility.
post #33 of 112

I feel for you, NYCveg.  My neighbor has a severe peanut allergy.  His mother goes to great lengths to ensure his safety but his allergy is so life-threatening, I can't imagine they eat out.  He cannot eat nuts or things produced in a nut processing place.  His allergiest has had 10 kids with allergies as severe as his and 6 of those kids are dead.  Living next door to him, I was sure to ask exactly about his allergy.  He is in 7th grade now so he doesn't really have the "hands in mouth after playground" thing.  The school is not nut-free but the summer camp they attend is due to his mother's dilligence.

 

His allergy is a disability and I get tired of people grumbling about having the camp nut-free or whatever.  Don't you think his mother would love to not have to think about this at all?  Don't you think his mother would love not to have to train everyone he know in epi-pen use?  This isn't an attention thing.  Should the boy just stay at home forever?

 

I admire her courage to be the "pain in the ass" so her son can live his life.  

post #34 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post
Cleaning your kids after they eat (washing their hands or wiping hands and face with WetOnes) and trying to keep food in places where food is expected (e.g., at the picnic table and not on the slide) are FAR more important steps to take, I think, than not eating nuts in public.

 

 

Honestly, I thinking cleaning up with whatever your cleaning medium of choice is and keeping food to food-eating locations are pretty much acts of common courtesy.

post #35 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngfrankenstein View Post

I feel for you, NYCveg.  My neighbor has a severe peanut allergy.  His mother goes to great lengths to ensure his safety but his allergy is so life-threatening, I can't imagine they eat out.  He cannot eat nuts or things produced in a nut processing place.  His allergiest has had 10 kids with allergies as severe as his and 6 of those kids are dead.  Living next door to him, I was sure to ask exactly about his allergy.  He is in 7th grade now so he doesn't really have the "hands in mouth after playground" thing.  The school is not nut-free but the summer camp they attend is due to his mother's dilligence.

 

His allergy is a disability and I get tired of people grumbling about having the camp nut-free or whatever.  Don't you think his mother would love to not have to think about this at all?  Don't you think his mother would love not to have to train everyone he know in epi-pen use?  This isn't an attention thing.  Should the boy just stay at home forever?

 

I admire her courage to be the "pain in the ass" so her son can live his life.  


I worked at a summer camp when i was in college, and there were 2 weeks every summer that we prepared food special for a kid with severe severe allergies. He also had a peanut allergy, so ALL peanut butter was put away, everything disinfected, staff was told to remove peanut butter from their cabins (to be stored in another place for those 2 weeks), and it was hard but do-able. No one suffered. I do know that because of the great lengths we took to keep this child safe we asked that all peanut allergic children come to camp during one of those 2 weeks if they were going to come at all (unless it was not severe and contact would not cause problems, and the child was old enough to self monitor to some extent).

post #36 of 112
Regarding my son who is severely anaphylactic to peanuts, milk, soy, ALL MEATS, legumes, oat, lobster, peaches - the list goes on and on. He can only eat, even now at 11, a few fruits and vegetables, wheat, rice and barley. He has been on a prescribed supplement called neocate since he was 6 months old. He has never had Ice cream, a hot dog or eaten in a restaurant. Mae make all his food homemade at home.

Being a parent of a child who has such allergies and knowing that he is so severely allergic to all, keeps you on edge every minute of every day. Preperaring for him to go to school was the hardest part, we couldn't control what went on there. For the first 3 years of school we went to have lunch with him every day so we could ensure no contact was made. We quit our jobs and started our own cleaning service so we could be with him every day. Since then, schools have progressed peanut is no longer an issue, it has been banned from our school. But what really surprises me is the way parents of unallergic children act! They argue that peanut butter is what their kids eat each day, that our kids should be more careful, they continue to send products with peanuts regardless of the rules. To me, that's like telling your child it's ok to bring a knife to school. They will both have the end result, a child could die.

To All the parents of allergic children who are in cities that still allow peanut products in schools and on buses, don't give up!
post #37 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janetdavid View Post

. But what really surprises me is the way parents of unallergic children act! They argue that peanut butter is what their kids eat each day, that our kids should be more careful, they continue to send products with peanuts regardless of the rules. To me, that's like telling your child it's ok to bring a knife to school. They will both have the end result, a child could die.
To All the parents of allergic children who are in cities that still allow peanut products in schools and on buses, don't give up!

I don't think anyone here is saying it's okay to break those rules.  I just think they're saying they'll cross that bridge when they come to it.  I don't think all things should be nut-free until there is a need.

post #38 of 112
Thread Starter 
They do wash their hands after they eat, and I wipe the little one's face (she's the one who likes peanut butter.) But she often gets food in her hair, and I don't wash her hair, and she often gets food on her clohtes, and I don't change her clothes. And the older one is probably covered in peanut dust on a regular basis, as a favorite snack of hers is peanuts in the shell.

If you aren't allergic, nuts are a very healthy food, and I don't want to keep them from eating nuts, but I wonder how far I should go if I take them to the park after having peanut butter. We don't eat at the park very often so that aspect hadn't occurred to me.

When the older one was in preschool, there was a kid there with a bad peanut allergy, and I wouldn't let her have anything peanut related until after she was in school each day. So no peanut butter on toast for breakfast, for instance.
post #39 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janetdavid View Post

Being a parent of a child who has such allergies and knowing that he is so severely allergic to all, keeps you on edge every minute of every day. Preperaring for him to go to school was the hardest part, we couldn't control what went on there. For the first 3 years of school we went to have lunch with him every day so we could ensure no contact was made. We quit our jobs and started our own cleaning service so we could be with him every day. Since then, schools have progressed peanut is no longer an issue, it has been banned from our school. But what really surprises me is the way parents of unallergic children act! They argue that peanut butter is what their kids eat each day, that our kids should be more careful, they continue to send products with peanuts regardless of the rules. To me, that's like telling your child it's ok to bring a knife to school. They will both have the end result, a child could die.

To All the parents of allergic children who are in cities that still allow peanut products in schools and on buses, don't give up!

 

I'm sorry that has been your experience. I would never send my ds to school with peanut butter, when he wants PB&J sandwiches for lunch we buy SoyNut Butter (which is completely nut-free and made in a nut free facility according to the label). He calls it PB&J, but its not peanut butter.

post #40 of 112
Quote:

Originally Posted by Youngfrankenstein View Post

 

His allergy is a disability and I get tired of people grumbling about having the camp nut-free or whatever.  Don't you think his mother would love to not have to think about this at all?  Don't you think his mother would love not to have to train everyone he know in epi-pen use?  This isn't an attention thing.  Should the boy just stay at home forever?

 

I admire her courage to be the "pain in the ass" so her son can live his life.  

 

 

I agree. Food allergies aren't an issue for my family, and honestly, I love the ease of currently being able to toss a PB&J in my kids lunch.

 

However, the very minor concessions asked of those of us for whom it isn't an issue to save another child from a life threatening emergency seem, well, minor.

 

One parents fear that their child isn't eating enough compared to another child having a life threatening emergency? Really?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
  • How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)