or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm... - Page 3

post #41 of 112

*


Edited by AbbyGrant - 6/28/12 at 9:22pm
post #42 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

 

You have lots of expectation of others and I see no regard for my child's immune system -why are you trying to control others?

 

 

I kind of can't believe I'm having this conversation. I have said multiple times that I have NO expectations of others. I take care of my kid and do my best to keep her safe. THE OP ASKED WHAT SHE COULD DO TO KEEP FOOD ALLERGIC KIDS SAFE. I responded that cleaning your kids and keeping food in designated areas is more important than not bringing the allergens altogether. I stick by that. 

 

I'm out of this thread.

post #43 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post

I kind of can't believe I'm having this conversation. I have said multiple times that I have NO expectations of others. I take care of my kid and do my best to keep her safe. THE OP ASKED WHAT SHE COULD DO TO KEEP FOOD ALLERGIC KIDS SAFE. I responded that cleaning your kids and keeping food in designated areas is more important than not bringing the allergens altogether. I stick by that. 

 

I'm out of this thread.

 

I appreciate your input, FWIW. I try to keep baby wipes on me for wiping hands and such, but sometimes I forget. It's good (for me anyway) to know what is most important. And quite frankly, my kids immune system is great, and washing his sticky fingers a few times a day isn't going to hurt it. I don't know why serenbat got upset with your post, please don't take it personally.

post #44 of 112

My kids don't have food allergies, but we know children who suffer with them. When they were elementary school age, I did not send peanut butter sandwiches or nut products for lunch at school or camp. When I was on school council and responsible for organizing snacks for events, I always ensured that they were nut-free (along with respecting religious requirements). I'm in the general habit of not taking nut products from home into public spaces, but I don't check the ingredient list of everything (eg. cookies, granola bars etc.) so I'm sure that it's happened.

 

Since middle school age or even younger, the kids often packed their own lunches and snacks, and they are much less careful, so they've probably taken nut products on their own.  Not to school or camp, since they know the nut-free rules at those places, but for other outings - eg. picnics with their friends in the park.

 

Also, if we purchased something  eg. nut-coated ice-cream treats or candy bars while we were out, I admit that I didn't take special precautions at playgrounds or other public spaces, eg. the mall or museums etc. 

post #45 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

One parents fear that their child isn't eating enough compared to another child having a life threatening emergency? Really?

Uhhh for some kids, not eating enough IS a life-threatening emergency.
post #46 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post


Uhhh for some kids, not eating enough IS a life-threatening emergency.

 

 Oh for pete's sake.  Yes, over time, if a child is starving themselves or is unable to derive enough nourishment from what they eat (it's not always a picky eater/small group of foods thing, lots of absorbtion/digestion stuff out there too).  For anaphylaxis, that's damn near instantaneous, you don't have an hour or two (or a couple of days) to balance it out and get more food into the child or (let's hope, if we're talking advanced starvation here) get access to medical feeding care--we're talking death in minutes without emergency intervention.  If a child is so close to death from lack of food unless their mom can give them peanut butter/shrimp/beets/whatever right at that moment, can we at least hope that they also wouldn't be at school or on the playground, where they're expending all that energy (and would they be able to in the first place, should their life be hanging in the balance as to whether they eat this one snack at this very moment in time right in that place)?  If they're NOT hanging in the balance, then there's time to come up with...a plan.  Probably a good idea to have anyway, in the case of ANY sort of feeding special needs or restricted diet!

 

I understand that some people cannot stand to have any sort of rules or behavior "imposed" on them (hey, I had some people almost kill a child in my care thanks to that outlook!) but...sheesh.

post #47 of 112

We don't even think about it when going out in the gen public

 

Our preschool is nut free.

 

Its reall hard for us to pay that much attention in a place that isnt nut free and imo it should fall under responsibility of parents of allergic kids to keep their kids as safe as they can.

post #48 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post

 Oh for pete's sake.  Yes, over time, if a child is starving themselves or is unable to derive enough nourishment from what they eat (it's not always a picky eater/small group of foods thing, lots of absorbtion/digestion stuff out there too).  For anaphylaxis, that's damn near instantaneous, you don't have an hour or two (or a couple of days) to balance it out and get more food into the child or (let's hope, if we're talking advanced starvation here) get access to medical feeding care--we're talking death in minutes without emergency intervention.  If a child is so close to death from lack of food unless their mom can give them peanut butter/shrimp/beets/whatever right at that moment, can we at least hope that they also wouldn't be at school or on the playground, where they're expending all that energy (and would they be able to in the first place, should their life be hanging in the balance as to whether they eat this one snack at this very moment in time right in that place)?  If they're NOT hanging in the balance, then there's time to come up with...a plan.  Probably a good idea to have anyway, in the case of ANY sort of feeding special needs or restricted diet!

I wasn't really talking about malnourishment. I am personally affected by this but don't want to get into it here. Anyway, I'm bowing out of the conversation, apparently I can't explain what I'm trying to say properly and things are being taken out of context. I swear I'm not trying to do put anyone in danger and I'm not inconsiderate and careless.
post #49 of 112

Good question, OP.  We don't have any known nut/food allergies in our family, but we know several kids that do, so it has been helpful in making us a little more diligent than we normally would be.  DD has been in nut-free schools since the outset, and as a result, we don't really buy peanut butter and stuff like that just because we don't really have use for it.  We are big nut eaters at home (cashews, almonds, pastachios), but DD tends to eat less of it than DH and I.  One hard rule that I've had from the outset:  no kids in the house until we've spoken with the parents about potential allergies.  I even do this because of our cat (as one of DD's friend's brings a spray in case the cat's dander gives her an allergy/asthma attack).  We've never had a problem, though.

 

I tend to err on the side of being as cautious as reasonably possible.  I don't have food allergies, but environmental factors such as other animals, perfumes, perfumed products, etc. sometimes can unexpectedly bring on an asthma attack (severe at times), and although not life threatening, I do feel like karma or some other weird rule of cards requires me to be reasonably cautious about known or potential dangers.  Maybe it's the lawyer in me too. 

 

My take on it is to exercise reasonableness.  Where the danger or potential danger is more likely, exercise extra caution.  It could be as simple as just leaving nuts at home and taking reasonable steps to wash up messy faces and fingers before going into public.  Not a huge burden, in my opinion. 

 

Besides, who takes food to the park?  I thought that was what Mr. Softy was for!  Sheepish.gif

post #50 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mommy View Post


Uhhh for some kids, not eating enough IS a life-threatening emergency.

 

 Oh for pete's sake.  Yes, over time, if a child is starving themselves or is unable to derive enough nourishment from what they eat (it's not always a picky eater/small group of foods thing, lots of absorbtion/digestion stuff out there too).  For anaphylaxis, that's damn near instantaneous, you don't have an hour or two (or a couple of days) to balance it out and get more food into the child or (let's hope, if we're talking advanced starvation here) get access to medical feeding care--we're talking death in minutes without emergency intervention.  If a child is so close to death from lack of food unless their mom can give them peanut butter/shrimp/beets/whatever right at that moment, can we at least hope that they also wouldn't be at school or on the playground, where they're expending all that energy (and would they be able to in the first place, should their life be hanging in the balance as to whether they eat this one snack at this very moment in time right in that place)?  If they're NOT hanging in the balance, then there's time to come up with...a plan.  Probably a good idea to have anyway, in the case of ANY sort of feeding special needs or restricted diet!

 

I understand that some people cannot stand to have any sort of rules or behavior "imposed" on them (hey, I had some people almost kill a child in my care thanks to that outlook!) but...sheesh.

 

Diabetes is one condition that I can think of where a child or adult may need food NOW so as to ward off an emergency, particularly if it is type 2. Usually it is well managed however, so isn't on many people's radar, but I know that diabetics often carry food everywhere so that they can eat as soon as certain symptoms show up. When I worked as a lifeguard we had glucose tablets available for anyone who needed them due to diabetes, we also had juice boxes around, and were instructed to give them to anyone who complained of certain symptoms, or to anyone who stated they were diabetic and needed sugar.

post #51 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super~Single~Mama View Post

If you don't use wet-ones then perhaps a damp washcloth in a plastic baggie? This is what my ex usually does and it works really well. (sorry, can't quote easily from my phone)

That is genius. Why did I never think of that before? We also pack a little washcloth that the kids use as napkins but I never thought to pack a wet one for messy things. They would love it, especially my two year old who doesn't like messy hands.

post #52 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super~Single~Mama View Post

 

Diabetes is one condition that I can think of where a child or adult may need food NOW so as to ward off an emergency, particularly if it is type 2. Usually it is well managed however, so isn't on many people's radar, but I know that diabetics often carry food everywhere so that they can eat as soon as certain symptoms show up..

 

 

Are you implying that there are preschoolers with type 2 Diabetes who need to eat PB&J while climbing on playground equipment in order to live? Seriously? I think if parents practiced better eating habits with their children there would be fewer people with type 2 diabetes. I've watched children climb around while eating complete junk -- and dropping it and picking it up and keep eating. I just don't buy that it is healthy for anyone.

 

 

In 15 years of parenting, most of it involved with other families with special needs kids, I have meet exactly 2 kids for whom not eating enough was a medical problem. Two. They both had special needs. One couldn't climb on anything as a small child. Both have sweet moms. Neither of their moms would argue their kids' need to eat -- which can happen anywhere -- needs to happen at a time or place that is potential harmful to another child.

post #53 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Super~Single~Mama View Post

 

Diabetes is one condition that I can think of where a child or adult may need food NOW so as to ward off an emergency, particularly if it is type 2. Usually it is well managed however, so isn't on many people's radar, but I know that diabetics often carry food everywhere so that they can eat as soon as certain symptoms show up..

 

 

Are you implying that there are preschoolers with type 2 Diabetes who need to eat PB&J while climbing on playground equipment in order to live? Seriously? I think if parents practiced better eating habits with their children there would be fewer people with type 2 diabetes. I've watched children climb around while eating complete junk -- and dropping it and picking it up and keep eating. I just don't buy that it is healthy for anyone.

 

 

In 15 years of parenting, most of it involved with other families with special needs kids, I have meet exactly 2 kids for whom not eating enough was a medical problem. Two. They both had special needs. One couldn't climb on anything as a small child. Both have sweet moms. Neither of their moms would argue their kids' need to eat -- which can happen anywhere -- needs to happen at a time or place that is potential harmful to another child.


Um...no? I was just responding to Tigerchild's post that said that the only only time EVER that a child would potentially DIE from not eating was after months of near starvation. Thats it. I didn't even mention PB in my post, or allergies, just a known condition that has nothing to do with starvation where someone might need food immediately. I didn't say diabetics are required to smear allergic children with peanut butter to survive.

 

And I really don't think my post was offensive. Why take it so personally?

 

ETA - I also wonder if anaphylactic (sp?) food allergies are really that much more common than diabetes in children. Maybe they are, but I don't know anyone who is deathly allergic to anything, although its possible that I just don't know about a childs allergy issues even though I know them.


Edited by Super~Single~Mama - 5/18/12 at 11:24am
post #54 of 112

Off topic, but I just think it was funny that as I was reading this thread, an add is displaying at the right-hand corner of my screen which reads:  "Are you normal, nuts or natural?"

post #55 of 112

When I have kids in school, we follow the rules about nuts (usually there is a ban as someone is usually allergic to them).  It is not that hard to do, and I have picky eaters.  

 

A good friend of my sons is allergic to peanuts.  We do not eat any nut products when we are around him, and I try to do a quick clean up if he is over (make sure the counters do not have a peanut butter smear on them - that sort of thing).   Thankfully, he was and is quite good about staying away from nuts - for years he was less good about carrying his epi-pen!  He is the reason we have Benadryl in the house.  Putting a face to an issue has really helped me see that these are actual children we are dealing with - not just words on a webpage or statistics.  

 

If we are going somewhere, I try to remind my youngest to wash her hands.  She often eats PB sandwiches before we go somewhere.

 

Lastly, I do not bring items to bake sales/potlucks with nuts in them.  I was at an event once where the child had to leave due to nut products in the cookies (it was a cookie exchange).  I felt bad for the family.  Inclusion is a good thing - so I try to make dishes most people can eat, or at least don't cause one to flee the room.


Edited by purslaine - 5/18/12 at 12:34pm
post #56 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super~Single~Mama View Post


Um...no? I was just responding to Tigerchild's post that said that the only only time EVER that a child would potentially DIE from not eating was after months of near starvation. Thats it. I didn't even mention PB in my post, or allergies, just a known condition that has nothing to do with starvation where someone might need food immediately. I didn't say diabetics are required to smear allergic children with peanut butter to survive.

 

And I really don't think my post was offensive. Why take it so personally?

 

ETA - I also wonder if anaphylactic (sp?) food allergies are really that much more common than diabetes in children. Maybe they are, but I don't know anyone who is deathly allergic to anything, although its possible that I just don't know about a childs allergy issues even though I know them.

 

I did not say only time EVER.  I said, in the context of this conversation, where we're talking about children either bringing a specific nut item to school to eat or noshing while running around on the playground, I did not think that there was a situation where a child was going to die if they didn't eat their nutty food where there wasn't a better substitute.  I'm familiar with type 1 diabetes, I have cared for children with it and grew up with family members who had it.  We never gave them a shot of peanut buttter or shrimp--as others have mentioned, we carried juice/hard candy/ect.  Don't know if the guidelines have changed all that much, but I'm going to guess that almost nobody is going to die if they cannot have a specific allergenic food for a couple of hours.  I am also quite familiar with children who have sensory eating disorders and other issues--but those were extreme, and involved medical interventions that did not mean they had to wander around the playground with a PB sandwich in hand.  While I'm sure the number of picky eaters or very small acceptance eaters (I have one of those) is far greater than kids with anaphylaxis reactions, again--I also believe it's a bigger deal to the child who will have their airway shut down vs. the one who is going to have to eat something else while on the playground or wait an hour.

 

The one liner comment in the broader conversation that I was responding to was pretty snarky.  You don't see that, really?

post #57 of 112
Quote:
I don't know why serenbat got upset with your post, 

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Quote:
If we notice a kid eating a bagel or something before dance class, I will try to get the kid a wipe;

 

 

the whole notion that it is expectable to go after another person's child with a chemical wipe and some how thing this OK.... and in the greater picture who was in the dance class prior and had that peanut butter sandwich and rubbed their hand on the barre without washing? 

 

 

 

AND-at the park today (and must be something in our area because all the parks have it) picnic tables right by the playground - it is unreasonable -IMO for a mother to wipe and wipe and wipe and wipe a child's hands, today I did see a child eating a sandwich (who knows what it was) but the child was small and there was no reason that child had to stay put with the last bite and could not get up (as he did) and run to the slide with half a sandwich- expecting others to conform and in this case it would according to NYC Veg not been right for this child to go to the slide and not keep that food at the designated area

 

going after others (in public in a non-designated "zone"- I certainly see schools but beyond that NO and even there we are really only so far as I know, talking about nuts, not everything else) is where I feel this is just way to excessive given the greater picture and all the potential threats  

it seems unrealistic and down right rude- I would never think to expose another child to a wipe (chemicals) for the sake of another- if you are that afraid, put gloves on your child, not go after others

post #58 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

Quote:
I don't know why serenbat got upset with your post, 

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Quote:
If we notice a kid eating a bagel or something before dance class, I will try to get the kid a wipe;

 

 

the whole notion that it is expectable to go after another person's child with a chemical wipe and some how thing this OK.... and in the greater picture who was in the dance class prior and had that peanut butter sandwich and rubbed their hand on the barre without washing?


Wow. So you would be perfectly OK with your child potentially being the cause of a deadly allergic reaction, than to some small contact with chemicals? I mean really, how many horrific chemicals could possibly be in one little wipe? Your child is exposed to more chemicals than that just going out in public because most public places use bleach to clean. Would you be ok with a parent asking your child to wash their hands with *gasp* soap and water? What if the teacher made it a habit at the start of class for everyone to wash their hands? Or is soap going to potentially kill your child?
post #59 of 112

the science isn't there for the wipes - http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/Press_releases/2004/05_08b_04.html

 

 

and NO as a perfect stranger in a public setting, and at dance class, etc- NO- you still are not really protecting the child with the allergies unless you clean all the surfaces, so NO you are not looking at the over all picture-you are choosing one child over another and the poster clearly stated using a "wipe" not asking that child for soap and water (and frankly she has NO WAY OF KNOWING who had what prior to walking in the dance class)- you are picking out one child solely because you saw them, you didn't just see the mother who ate peanuts in the trail mix and touched her child's hand- so NO, you are not really protecting the child with the allergies  

 

like I stated in the other examples, who touched what prior to that child? unless you are cleaning each and every item you have no REAL way of making sure instead you are pinning one against another

 

frankly I have a real problem with the overuse of cleaning chemicals and feel this need to clean (not just hands) is causing far more problems to ALL children and this need for this clean environment is perpetuated by those with allergies at the risk to others 

 

handing someone a "wipe" is out of line (what I was replying to) complete disregard for other's healthy - IMO

post #60 of 112

Oh, brother. I don't just wipe the kid. I ask the parent if it's okay. eyesroll.gif

 

Dd is actually one of two children in her dance class who is contact allergic/anaphylactic to wheat. The other parents have been really wonderful and understanding. I've been really lucky, both in school and extracurriculars, to deal with other parents who appreciate what it's like to have a child with life-threatening allergies and who are extremely considerate about trying to keep my child (and other allergic children) safe so that they can participate in regular, childhood activities.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
  • How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)