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post #61 of 112

Old Fogey warning: Why is it people eat everywhere these days? I was at a science museum and people were wandering around the exhibits with fried chicken and there was popcorn strewn throughout the entire place. I'm very grateful ds doesn't have major allergies and think it's really the least people can do to not sprinkle and smear food wherever they go.

post #62 of 112

SuperSingleMama-

I have removed your previous post in this forum.  Per the UA: Mothering.com members are required to treat one other with respect and courtesy at all times. 

 

Please feel free to debate the content of another person's post, but do not turn things into personal attacks. 

post #63 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post

Old Fogey warning: Why is it people eat everywhere these days? I was at a science museum and people were wandering around the exhibits with fried chicken and there was popcorn strewn throughout the entire place. I'm very grateful ds doesn't have major allergies and think it's really the least people can do to not sprinkle and smear food wherever they go.

\

I agree.  I tend to plan ahead and make sure everyone will have what they need for a day trip like that but I don't feel the need to eat a lot outside of meals on the go because we really don't have to have food everywhere. 

post #64 of 112

I would like to further remind posters to give each other the benefit of the doubt.  If another poster says something you find offensive you can either:
1) ask for clarifcation

2) report to Moderators

 

Please do not make personal attacks.

 

As always, feel free to PM me with any questions or concerns.  I am quite confident all of the posters on this thread are simply doing the best they can for their kids and are normal, caring adults.  Please keep that in mind when considering their motivations.

post #65 of 112

In response to the OP, I do nothing. Our school is not nut-free and the kids frequently do crafts with food. The teacher sends out a note beforehand listing the ingredients to make sure no one has an issue with any of them.

 

That being said, we have several friends with allergies, although no one with severe contact allergies, and we are more careful when we are around them. And we only eat sitting at the table, not smearing food all over surfaces other kids are likely to touch, so I don't feel like we need to change any of our habits surrounding that. I never thought about having peanut dust on our clothes that could make someone sick, but if we became aware of someone in our community with that type of sensitivity, we'd probably change our habits to help keep them safe from exposure to us.

post #66 of 112
Thread Starter 
I had forgotten how intense allergy threads could be! But I appreciate all the feedback. I think we'll be more careful about wiping hands/face, though I think I've been pretty good about that. I don't think I'm going to do more unless and until we get information about someone they have regular contact with who has a very sensitive allergy. I think I might be a bit more careful before we play somewhere inside, like at the library or something, than outside, because it seems like nut shell bits and dust would blow away or something better outside. I just feel bad for kids who have to worry about things like whether there's nut residue on anything anywhere. Our family is very lucky, in so many ways.

Thanks for all the feedback. Really, even the disagreements helped to clear my mind about this.
post #67 of 112

A little OT, but it would generally be people with type 1 diabetes who have the issues with hypos and need to eat NOW (or type 2's using insulin). Nuts would not be an ideal choice, they need sugar, be it glucose tablets, juice or sweets. Then a small snack of somthing with a starchy carbohydrate, snadwich, cereal bar or something.

 

I carry jelly sweets and a ceral bar. I do make sure to have a nut free bar as my kids school is nut free and I voluteer in the classrooms regularly.

 

Like others I have to say I've never really thought too much about playgrounds and other places we may be having a picnic. I do wash hands before eating and, most often afterwards, I don't want the kids attraching wasps with thier sticky fingers & faces.

 

If we're going somewhere I know there are kids with nut allergies I avoid peanut butter from breakfast, and I;m sure my sofa got vacumed far more often than usuall when I hosted coffee mornings where I knew we had a child with allergies.

 

I would not be offended if someone asked me to make sure I wiped down my childs hands & face after eating at a class. Just because there may be kids who ate nuts in the car on the way doesn't make it worthless to wipe down the child you've seen eating nuts. It still reduces the risks and might help other people think about them too. We have allergies to some wipes but I've never been to a class that didn't have a toilet area with sinks.

 

Now if I could get my kids class to take precautions if they insist on having dogs visit the classroom I would be happy. 3 visits in the last 7 weeks and I'm feeling pretty fed up. Really, meet the dog in the playground or soemthing. just not on the carpet in the classroom.

post #68 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post

Old Fogey warning: Why is it people eat everywhere these days? I was at a science museum and people were wandering around the exhibits with fried chicken and there was popcorn strewn throughout the entire place. I'm very grateful ds doesn't have major allergies and think it's really the least people can do to not sprinkle and smear food wherever they go.

I sort of agree with you.

 

In addition to the allergy and ick factor of smeared food, I think the whole "we need to have food all the time" just adds (or is a symptom of?) our obesity issues.  You know what - you can wait 15 minutes for food, and you can eat it is sitting down at a table. This is not a  judgement of individual wandering around with food - but a critique of the "need to have food now" mentality in general.  

post #69 of 112
Quote:
"we need to have food all the time"

 

this definitely seems to be growing! European made cars (kept in Europe) don't come equipped with cup holder but ours do

 

 

 

Quote:
 I;m sure my sofa got vacumed far more often than usuall when I hosted coffee mornings where I knew we had a child with allergies.

regular is fine, if you have pets sure you know hepa is best

 

with peanuts it is just not the peanut butter and so many forget sooooo much can contain peanuts, many Asia foods are cooked and fried in peanut oils and that can go all over

 

 

post #70 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

 

this definitely seems to be growing! European made cars (kept in Europe) don't come equipped with cup holder but ours do

 

 

 

regular is fine, if you have pets sure you know hepa is best

 

with peanuts it is just not the peanut butter and so many forget sooooo much can contain peanuts, many Asia foods are cooked and fried in peanut oils and that can go all over

 

 

Actually, peanut oil is not necessarily or even usually an allergen for peanut-allergic kids, and many allergists/doctors will say that heat-pressed peanut oil is fine for those with peanut allergy. Because oil is 100% fat, theoretically there should be no peanut protein in it. Cold-pressed peanut oil, like the kind you would buy in the health food store, is problematic, because its processing does not remove all traces of peanut protein; but restaurants that cook in peanut oil use commercial, heat-pressed oil. The problem at, say, a Chinese restaurant or at 5 Guys burgers is the actual peanuts that are everywhere, not the oil.

 

Of course, many parents with peanut-allergic children avoid the oil altogether, just to be on the safe side, and it's an area of controversy among doctors. But if you ate Chick-Fil-A fries cooked in peanut oil, you are not very likely to cause a reaction for a peanut-allergic child, certainly not in the way you are if you eat a peanut butter sandwich. 

post #71 of 112

The person I know reacts to peanut oil as since he was a child- that is actually one of the first ways they found what was going on with him- he hadn't had peanut-butter when he was first diagnosed. What sent him first to the ER as a child was sesame oil.

post #72 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

The person I know reacts to peanut oil as since he was a child- that is actually one of the first ways they found what was going on with him- he hadn't had peanut-butter when he was first diagnosed. What sent him first to the ER as a child was sesame oil.

Yes, sesame oil is usually unrefined and therefore is much more likely to cause allergies in sesame-allergic people. Certainly, individuals can react to nut oils, particularly cold-pressed nut oils. This thread was about caring with others with food allergies and my point was that eating or handling food cooked in peanut oil is far, far less likely to cause an allergic reaction in most allergic individuals than peanuts themselves. 

post #73 of 112

    *


Edited by AbbyGrant - 6/28/12 at 9:23pm
post #74 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post

Old Fogey warning: Why is it people eat everywhere these days? I was at a science museum and people were wandering around the exhibits with fried chicken and there was popcorn strewn throughout the entire place. I'm very grateful ds doesn't have major allergies and think it's really the least people can do to not sprinkle and smear food wherever they go.

 

 

yeahthat.gif

 

Seriously.  Growing up, if you were eating in public it meant you had enough to share.  With everyone.

(Obvious exceptions: State fairs, lunchroom at school... you get the idea.)

post #75 of 112
Thread Starter 
I agree with that too. And why is that every kid event I take a kid to involves a snack, no matter how long the event is and how close it is to a meal? Like an event from 11 to 12 includes a snack even though we'd have lunch right after it anyway. I don't get that. We need another thread. LOL.
post #76 of 112

Honestly, I'm not. Mine don't and won't go to school, so "peanut free" zones aren't a thing for us to worry about.

 

For about a year, I did take excessive care to not let my 4YO play with others when she had had nuts, until she had been wiped down or changed if it got in her clothes. But it got to the point that I just stopped.

 

As harsh as it sounds, the allergy-afflicted kid is not something I'm going to live my life or run my kids' lives around. Until they are old enough to advocate for themselves, they are their parents' responsibility. I can't be responsible for other peoples' kids and their conditions. If the child is that allergic, the parents need to keep an eye on them and ask others if contamination is a potential issue, every single time they play. If they don't and the child has a reaction, it's on the parents, not on me or my kids. It's their responsibility to inform other parents about the issues and then either keep the child away from contamination sources, or ask the parents of other children to take reasonable steps to insure contamination isn't an issue at that particular playdate.

 

I mean, for all I know, Bob has a polyester allergy. Does that mean that everything I buy cannot have polyester in it, because there's a random chance that I'll run into Bob somewhere? Why should I take extra precaution against peanut dust because someone, somewhere might be allergic to it?

post #77 of 112

I always wonder why in a country so devoted to peanut butter there is peanuts allergy! where I live, no one has it, is not an issue at all. some people have celiacs but never ever heard of a peanut allergic kid. Why could this be? Peanuts are eaten, its very common to have them at bdays, or eating them while drinking beer in bars.

 

If I knew of an allergic person present, I would not bring peanuts-not a problem at all.

post #78 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alasen View Post


 

I mean, for all I know, Bob has a polyester allergy. Does that mean that everything I buy cannot have polyester in it, because there's a random chance that I'll run into Bob somewhere? Why should I take extra precaution against peanut dust because someone, somewhere might be allergic to it?

This was my point further up. Of course, I take normal precautions in normal situations and special precautions when told about a specific child's issues, but you can't really prepare for every eventuality out in public.

post #79 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by delfin View Post

I always wonder why in a country so devoted to peanut butter there is peanuts allergy! where I live, no one has it, is not an issue at all. some people have celiacs but never ever heard of a peanut allergic kid. Why could this be? Peanuts are eaten, its very common to have them at bdays, or eating them while drinking beer in bars.

 

If I knew of an allergic person present, I would not bring peanuts-not a problem at all.

The most common allergens in any culture tend to be the foods that are consumed most frequently. The top eight in the US--peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, dairy, eggs, fish, shellfish--are all foods that are consumed in abundance. In the Middle East, sesame allergy is much more prevalent than it is elsewhere, because sesame is a much more commonly consumed food. Fish and shellfish are more common allergens in Asia than wheat and nuts, and certain fruits (stone fruits and pip fruits) are more common allergens in Europe than in the US. 

 

Also, just to clarify, celiac is not the same as the wheat allergy, although they are commonly confused with one another. Celiac is a disease in which the small intestine becomes damaged and does not absorb food properly. My daughter has a true wheat allergy: consuming, touching, or inhaling wheat causes an IgE reaction; if she ingests wheat, it will cause anaphylaxis.

post #80 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by delfin View Post

I always wonder why in a country so devoted to peanut butter there is peanuts allergy! where I live, no one has it, is not an issue at all. some people have celiacs but never ever heard of a peanut allergic kid. Why could this be? Peanuts are eaten, its very common to have them at bdays, or eating them while drinking beer in bars.

 

If I knew of an allergic person present, I would not bring peanuts-not a problem at all.

I heard that peanut by products were/are an undisclosed ingredient in vaccines. That would account for it.

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Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › How careful are you with nuts if your child doesn't have allergies (ie residue and potential harm to children who DO have allergies)