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What resembles aspergers but is not?  

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

The title says it all--what are some things that resemble/appear like aspergers but are actually something else?  I'm looking in relation to an adult, not a child.

post #2 of 18

High Functioning Autism, PDD-NOS, possibly ADD/ADHD, and SPD.

post #3 of 18

Mixed Expressive Receptive Language Disorder and Pragmatic Language Disorder. 

 

Either can be addressed in childhood, but the long term studies show considerable impairments as people move into adulthood. These deficits make the person sound like an aspie and cause some of the same social isolation that aspies face. 

post #4 of 18

Speaking as an adult with Asperger's, I wouldn't even want to make a suggestion without knowing what YOU think Asperger's would look like, because without knowing that, my best guess would be you're seeing a stereotype of what you think Asperger's is which you are projecting onto that person, for whatever subjective reason you have, knowingly or unknowingly.

post #5 of 18

Selective mutism, social anxiety, generalized anxiety disorder, schizoid personality disorder, nonverbal learning disability, PTSD, sensory processing disorder, giftedness, asynchronous development, hyperlexia, OCD.
 

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

A little more background information:

 

A close male family member was diagnosed with Asperger's by a team of clinicians at a very reputable organization.  He was age 25 (which was about 5 years ago).  Multiple family members (including himself) feel that is not the correct diagnosis for him though.  I'm just looking for ideas that I can research to see if there is another explanation so that he can have a name for what he is feeling and have guidance on how to proceed.

 

Thanks for the input!

post #7 of 18

Another I forgot - reactive attachment disorder. 

post #8 of 18
I have posted this before in other threads, but Aditi Shankardass is a neurologist that did a TED speech about eegs and misdx.  She talked about how there are neurological disorders that commonly get misdx because they can have common characteristics.  ADHD, epilepsy, autism spectrum, sleep disorders, genetic disorders (williams syndrome and downs), learning disabilities (language and speech disorders and dyslexia), mental retardation, and sensory processing disorder were all on her list.
 
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnra View Post

A little more background information:

 

A close male family member was diagnosed with Asperger's by a team of clinicians at a very reputable organization.  He was age 25 (which was about 5 years ago).  Multiple family members (including himself) feel that is not the correct diagnosis for him though.  I'm just looking for ideas that I can research to see if there is another explanation so that he can have a name for what he is feeling and have guidance on how to proceed.

 

Thanks for the input!

 

 

You need to MYOB.  Your family member has been DX'd by a reputable team. You might not like the DX, but your need to deny it isn't going to help him at all. It's very frustrating as a parent of a child with SN to have family members who have no idea what they are talking about tell me that the DX for my son is wrong.  It's the height of arrogance for lay family members to decide what the DX should be in the face of a work-up by experienced clinicians. 

 

Accepting and dealing with ASDs is hard. You're not helping. 

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

I am *not* a lay family member or an outsider in this situation.  Out of respect to the privacy of the individual I have not provided much information, and I realize that has the potential to be confusing in an online environment.  

 

I'm simply looking for ideas to research.  Any ideas for possibilities of things I can research are appreciated.

post #11 of 18

CAPD (auditory processing disorder), especially if they seem pretty much ok when 1-1 but in groups or with background noise things fall apart.

 

you might want to read a book called "the mislabeled child" it goes through a bunch of diagnoses of the ASP/ADHD/LD variety that can easily be confused for each other.

post #12 of 18

Since he was diagnosed by a team of professionals, I would highly doubt that they are wrong.  However, it's OK to research into similar conditions.  I wonder what prompted this person to go in for testing in the first place.  And I wonder why he thinks the doctors are wrong.  Maybe rnra can't share that information here, but it's worth considering.  Asperger's is not just one thing.  Nobody has ALL of the symptoms of Asperger's.  I am so sick of people (no one specifically in this thread) thinking that because a person has empathy (or makes eye contact, or likes hugs, etc.), then they CAN'T POSSIBLY be on the autism spectrum.  It's not that simple. 

post #13 of 18

RNRA - my son has been on and off the spectrum so many times it's ridiculous.  We found a new developmental pediatrician who realized that, while he presents as being on the spectrum, he's doesn't belong there.  He just doesn't fit into any of their "boxes" (which sounds like your relative).  He ordered a micro array and fragile x testing.  Fragile X was normal but it turns out he has a genetic deletion at 16p11.2.  The description reads like a book on my son.  This deletion is known to cause autism OR autistic like behaviors, speech delay and a host of other physical and developmental challenges.  We have our answer, have participated in a study and have all the necessary interventions lined up.

 

So, what I'm trying to say is.... maybe it's genetic?

 

Rivertam, I see nothing wrong with a family member who loves and respects someone to say "maybe this isn't right, maybe we aren't going down the right path".  My son's genetic deletion, for example, can cause a heart condition that would only be picked up on an echo cardiogram.  By learning that he has this, we were able to take precautions and keep him safe.  There is nothing wrong with making sure you've dotted your i's and crossed your t's - even if the person is an adult, was diagnosed by a reputable team (my son's first DP was reputable too - she felt he was autistic - she was wrong).  

post #14 of 18

If you want to do research, the best resource is "The Mislabeled Child." I know it's not directed to adults, but it clearly lays out different learning disabilities and developmental problems and what they look like.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpottedFoxx View Post

Rivertam, I see nothing wrong with a family member who loves and respects someone to say "maybe this isn't right, maybe we aren't going down the right path".  My son's genetic deletion, for example, can cause a heart condition that would only be picked up on an echo cardiogram.  By learning that he has this, we were able to take precautions and keep him safe.  There is nothing wrong with making sure you've dotted your i's and crossed your t's - even if the person is an adult, was diagnosed by a reputable team (my son's first DP was reputable too - she felt he was autistic - she was wrong).  

 

 

If I said, right now, that ASDs are commonly caused by genetic deletions and your child's symptoms sound EXACTLY like an ASD and simply knowing the exact deletion doesn't mean that it isn't an ASD, how would you feel? You'd tell me to me to MYOB and let you and your child's doctors do what is best for your child.

post #16 of 18

Actually River, if it came from a family member or friend I wouldn't tell them to MYOB - I'd ask them why they felt that way.  They may be seeing something that I am just not seeing because I'm too close to the situation.  I've found that those close to me are my biggest source of comfort, information and a good butt kicking when necessary.    

 

My son has been on and off the spectrum more times than I can count.  At this point, we know that it's not ASD.  However, if the criteria changes and it puts him on the spectrum it wouldn't make a difference because we have the proper services in place that no matter what you call it - he's getting all the help he needs and that's really all that matters.

 

Having a correct diagnosis - even as an adult can make a world of difference.  I wasn't diagnosed dyslexic till I was 19 years old.  Having that diagnosis did nothing for me educationally (too late) but it has helped me understand how I learn and has helped me in the work force.

 

Hold up an important paper to your nose and read it.  Can you?  You may be able to make out a few words but can't necessarily see the big picture.  A good friend/family member will guide your hand back a few inches to help you see the big picture.  That's a blessing - not a curse.

post #17 of 18
Quote:

Originally Posted by rnra View Post

 

 I'm just looking for ideas that I can research to see if there is another explanation so that he can have a name for what he is feeling and have guidance on how to proceed.

 

 

With a full evaluation from a team, he should have been given a lot more information than just a label. The details of WHY that label was felt to be the best one for his collection issues, details about his IQ test, processing speed etc.  If he did not get that information, I would suggests he requests copies of his records and start there.

 

If he is not already in counseling, I suggest he find a good person to talk this through with. Many of the issues faced by adults on the higher end of the spectrum are appropriate to work on in talk therapy, including social issues, anxiety, and self acceptance. Talk therapy is what makes sense when anyone is working through feelings and feels stuck.

 

The exact name of what he is feeling may or may not be helpful to him. There is a really good chance he has the right name already -- the older someone is, the easier it is to do an eval. It's really pretty unlikely that a team of people evaluating someone in their 20's is missed the mark completely.  This is not in the same league as evaluating a nonverbal toddler.

 

So that's my 2 cents -- he should read through his records and find a therapist to talk to.

post #18 of 18

Closing thread at request on OP.

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