or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Parenting the Gifted Child › Public School & Homeschool?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Public School & Homeschool? - Page 2

post #21 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post


As a homeschooling parent of four kids who have done a lot of science over the years (my eldest ias graduated high school now) I have not ever found such a comprehensive book or program that I feel is worth the paper it's written on. The grade-levelled stuff tends to be so shallow and superficial as to be useless for kids with even a vague interest in things scientific. If it's at a high enough level to have a depth of content it's too dry and/or laden with written work for a younger child. My dd9 has been using a program like this through our school district's homeschooling umbrella program; to find any new or interesting information we've had to go four grade levels ahead. We mostly skip the units in her areas of particular interest because the material is stuff she's already more than familiar with. In areas she hasn't learned much about we end up ditching more than half the written work, because she just doesn't have the stamina expected of 7th graders... and it's pretty dull stuff for the most part. Most of what we do for science has to be outside the realm of the curriculum, or else she'd start finding science to be pretty boring. And I don't want that, because she currently loves science and has a wonderful scientific mind.
What we end up doing is gleaning resources that are not grade-levelled, based on my kids' particular interests. Not curriculum, for the most part. Typically books written by creative scientists interested in sharing their passions with young people. Or documentaires, or real-life applications of science. Because science covers everything from geology to theoretical physics to animal behavior to genetics, you don't find passion and creativity spanning all those areas in a comprehensive way. Although it's more work for the parent, I've found that the best way to raise a keen little scientist is to help your child with the exploration and discovery process on a topic-by-topic basis. After all, that's what science is in practice... encountering things that make you curious, asking questions about your observations, and seeking answers.
Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're asking for, because I don't think what you're asking for could exist. In what way could science be made "linear"?
Miranda

When you learn anything you start small and expand upon. That's what I mean but linear, starting at 1 and moving up. She knows a lot of facts about animal biology & human biology. She is also interested in Astronomy & Geology. On top of that she loves plant life & dinosaurs. It goes on and on and on. Obviously she wants to learn all of this. Of course I am going to need multiple texts to give to her. I am sure there is a text out there that explains in great detail how to introduce a young child to the world of science. I am not a science teacher but maybe I need to consult an actual teacher of the subject or texts designed for the teacher because that's a lot different than what I am getting here. If she were in classroom at school with a science teacher allowing her to guide him in whatever direction she wanted to go or learn about , I am sure he would be full of information that he could expand upon, and probably would have a wealth information in some reference material. That's what I am looking for, thanks for helping me get to that realization.

post #22 of 64
You might enjoy Nebel's "Building Foundations in Scientific Understanding."

Miranda
post #23 of 64

My son, now 8, is very fond of all things science... Here are some of our favorites (we homeschool but don't follow a set curriculum):

 

Usborne has some great basic science books. My son liked "What's Chemistry All About?" and "What's Physics All About?" when he was your daughter's age:

http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?area=S&subcat=SWSA&id=3834

 

He also enjoyed the Brainwaves books:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6252411-the-most-explosive-science-book-in-the-universe-by-the-brainwaves

 

Mine's a very hands-on kind of kid, so we have lots of books with ideas for experiments. Science Rocks! is one. DK does some good ones-- The Way Science Works is one. DK also has some fun science reference books- we have a shelf-full because my son went through a DK phase. There's lots... 365 Science Experiments is another. Some fun electronics projects ones published by Kids Can Press... We have picked up lots of these in library books sales and at used bookstores, because the projects experiments don't really go out of date :)

 

My son liked BrainPop (website) for short basic introductions to lots of science topics. Ones that grabbed his interest generally led to further exploration using other resources. Discovery Education has great videos. And Google is pretty awesome :)

 

Science is such a huge subject that any textbook that tries to be comprehensive is going to be pretty much scratching the surface. If you have a science-y kid who likes to focus and dive in deep, you may find better and more interesting material by looking for- for instance-- a great book on genetics, or a cool documentary on black holes, or a website on human anatomy.

 

Other cool things to have-- a good microscope, science kits (snap circuits, chemistry sets etc), a library card! And really- TIME! One of the best things about switching to home learning in grade 1, for us, was having so much more time to pursue interests. I found it harder when he was in school all day and then came home and had a million things he wanted to do before bedtime.

 

One thought about your comment re. linear learning, or as you put it, "start small and expand upon". That may be how your daughter likes to learn, in which case this may not be relevant to you, but I just thought I'd put this out there as food for thought.... Some kids don't like to learn that way, at least not all the time. My son often likes to get the big picture, the high level concepts etc- and then he will go back and fill in pieces as he sees a need. Trying to give him little bits and pieces in a more linear fashion-- as is done in the classroom- would drive him crazy. I tend to be more linear myself, so it has been an interesting process for me to see this preference emerge in his learning style and to figure out how to support this.

post #24 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by browneyedmamasf View Post

@Pigpokey I don't think my daughter is interested in being home schooled because that means she will no longer be in class with her Friends, no more recess with friends, no more group projects with friends, no more field day, field trips, or class parties with friends. Yes she can make more friends, and even maintain the ones that she does have, but she will no longer be in school with them, I know my daughter and that would devastate her.

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends.  I am reminded of a quote from the movie Heathers that goes something like this:  "My parents wanted to move me into high school out of the sixth grade, but we decided to chuck the idea because I'd have trouble making friends, blah, blah, blah. Now blah, blah, blah is all I ever do. I use my great IQ to decide what color lip gloss to wear and how to hit three keggers before curfew."

 

(2) All these things are offered in almost any medium to large city in the United States inside the home and virtual schooling communities.  My children are in either class or practice or Scouts or whatever about 18-20 hours a week, and we don't have time to go to the weekly field trips, Robotics team, classes offering regular group projects, etc.  They do go to plenty of parties.  

post #25 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends. 

 

I see social development as important as any of the rest of it. One of our biggest reliefs when we switched from homeschooling to school (the kids were 10 and 12) was simply seeing the same kids day after day, and having the same basic cohort for a variety of activities including sports, drama and even girl scouts. My kids were finally able to make friends in a way that NEVER worked for us when we were homeschoolers. Our reality of homeschooling was that parents often said that would be a certain events, but then not show because they were tired and overwhelmed. Even when they did show, things that meet weekly cannot foster the kind of friendships that develop when children get to see each other every day.

 

Another relief was having so many things happen in one building so I was no longer driving all over the city -- we suddenly spent a lot less time in the car. Social activities were now with people who lived close by. Everything became simpler and easier. My kids spent more doing DOING and less time just getting back and forth. 

 

Back to the OPers first question, I honestly find it easier to be a fully engaged parent during evenings, weekends, and summers with my children in school.  I was really burnt out when I was homeschooling -- which I know is something that is taboo to say out loud, yet I heard from other homeschooling moms over and over when I was enmeshed with that subculture. 

 

I would never presume to tell another parent how their child could best be educated. It's complicated and at times I've had trouble figuring it out with my own children.

 

But I can see that my children are THRIVING in school -- socially, emotionally, and academically.

post #26 of 64

Absolutely school is something that can be a great choice and right for many families many  of their kids' learning years.  But I wanted to make a point that the OP should consider it after perhaps learning more about it and not discard it because her daughter says she wants to go to first grade.  In my point of view, the socialization can be a double edged sword and the good parts of the socialization can be teased out of the out of brick and mortar school community in most medium to large cities.  I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  My husband grew up in a coal mining town.  The dads got up, walked up the hill to work, came home at the same time.  

post #27 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

You might enjoy Nebel's "Building Foundations in Scientific Understanding."
Miranda

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy68 View Post

My son, now 8, is very fond of all things science... Here are some of our favorites (we homeschool but don't follow a set curriculum):

 

Usborne has some great basic science books. My son liked "What's Chemistry All About?" and "What's Physics All About?" when he was your daughter's age:

http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?area=S&subcat=SWSA&id=3834

 

He also enjoyed the Brainwaves books:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6252411-the-most-explosive-science-book-in-the-universe-by-the-brainwaves

 

Mine's a very hands-on kind of kid, so we have lots of books with ideas for experiments. Science Rocks! is one. DK does some good ones-- The Way Science Works is one. DK also has some fun science reference books- we have a shelf-full because my son went through a DK phase. There's lots... 365 Science Experiments is another. Some fun electronics projects ones published by Kids Can Press... We have picked up lots of these in library books sales and at used bookstores, because the projects experiments don't really go out of date :)

 

My son liked BrainPop (website) for short basic introductions to lots of science topics. Ones that grabbed his interest generally led to further exploration using other resources. Discovery Education has great videos. And Google is pretty awesome :)

 

Science is such a huge subject that any textbook that tries to be comprehensive is going to be pretty much scratching the surface. If you have a science-y kid who likes to focus and dive in deep, you may find better and more interesting material by looking for- for instance-- a great book on genetics, or a cool documentary on black holes, or a website on human anatomy.

 

Other cool things to have-- a good microscope, science kits (snap circuits, chemistry sets etc), a library card! And really- TIME! One of the best things about switching to home learning in grade 1, for us, was having so much more time to pursue interests. I found it harder when he was in school all day and then came home and had a million things he wanted to do before bedtime.

 

One thought about your comment re. linear learning, or as you put it, "start small and expand upon". That may be how your daughter likes to learn, in which case this may not be relevant to you, but I just thought I'd put this out there as food for thought.... Some kids don't like to learn that way, at least not all the time. My son often likes to get the big picture, the high level concepts etc- and then he will go back and fill in pieces as he sees a need. Trying to give him little bits and pieces in a more linear fashion-- as is done in the classroom- would drive him crazy. I tend to be more linear myself, so it has been an interesting process for me to see this preference emerge in his learning style and to figure out how to support this.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends.  I am reminded of a quote from the movie Heathers that goes something like this:  "My parents wanted to move me into high school out of the sixth grade, but we decided to chuck the idea because I'd have trouble making friends, blah, blah, blah. Now blah, blah, blah is all I ever do. I use my great IQ to decide what color lip gloss to wear and how to hit three keggers before curfew."

 

(2) All these things are offered in almost any medium to large city in the United States inside the home and virtual schooling communities.  My children are in either class or practice or Scouts or whatever about 18-20 hours a week, and we don't have time to go to the weekly field trips, Robotics team, classes offering regular group projects, etc.  They do go to plenty of parties.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

I see social development as important as any of the rest of it. One of our biggest reliefs when we switched from homeschooling to school (the kids were 10 and 12) was simply seeing the same kids day after day, and having the same basic cohort for a variety of activities including sports, drama and even girl scouts. My kids were finally able to make friends in a way that NEVER worked for us when we were homeschoolers. Our reality of homeschooling was that parents often said that would be a certain events, but then not show because they were tired and overwhelmed. Even when they did show, things that meet weekly cannot foster the kind of friendships that develop when children get to see each other every day.

 

Another relief was having so many things happen in one building so I was no longer driving all over the city -- we suddenly spent a lot less time in the car. Social activities were now with people who lived close by. Everything became simpler and easier. My kids spent more doing DOING and less time just getting back and forth. 

 

Back to the OPers first question, I honestly find it easier to be a fully engaged parent during evenings, weekends, and summers with my children in school.  I was really burnt out when I was homeschooling -- which I know is something that is taboo to say out loud, yet I heard from other homeschooling moms over and over when I was enmeshed with that subculture. 

 

I would never presume to tell another parent how their child could best be educated. It's complicated and at times I've had trouble figuring it out with my own children.

 

But I can see that my children are THRIVING in school -- socially, emotionally, and academically.

 

 

 

Mooninmamma thanks for the suggestion i will check it out :)

 

@Cassidy68 Thanks for all the suggestions. We do watch science based shows, we enjoy nova, and natgeo, as well as we recently watched the Frozen Planet special. I have the 365 science experiment book. I also appreciate you telling me about how your child likes to learn. It's cool that he goes back and fills in the gaps, my kid doesn't do that. But if she wants to do the whole picture first that's fine too, I think we naturally go back and forth but still I would like small- large just for the reference.  I am totally going to check out all your resources though, they sound great.

 

pigpokey I value human relationships. I don't have a huge family for my child to have access to, we have mom dad and that's it. Developing long term relationships with other human beings is very important to me, of course things like lip gloss and drinking are going to come up. It's part of living life. I don't want to home school her, it's not something I find appealing, and she is not interested in it. Learning in a group setting, learning how to deal with peer pressure & conflicts & having to maintain relationships with people that aren't family over a long period of time is part of life. Reputations are created, consequences occur, its a healthy system of checks and balances that I want my daughter to have experience with long before college. I understand that your kids are involved in various programs outside of traditional "school" that's great for them, my daughter is also involved in various things outside of school, but school is valuable to us. We see at as necessary socially, morally, character building, filled with challenges,. Somethings of course are not great about traditional school, but no system is perfect not home school or traditional school and I hope my daughter will learn that nothing in this world is perfect its about making choices that you can live with. Home schooling is just not the choice for me.

 

@ Linda on the move Thanks for your honesty about how you chose how to educate your children. Sometimes I think people see the world as black and white it's not it's grey. I can relate to the whole not being in the car all day thing. We walk everywhere, except ballet class. We are able to give so much to our community by being part of our neighborhood school, I tutor a few kids a couple times of week with reading, I volunteer in her class, and in other classes, I will be starting a girl scout troop this fall for first grade. She loves being part of her community as well, walking with all the kids to school, taking part in community cleanups, and participating at the school neighborhood garden. This choice of mine was also complicated.

 

Thanks Everyone

 

Michelle

 

btw for those of you who have sent me private messages, I am not able to respond because I have to have at least 10 Valid Posts whatever that means :) So once I get them I will reply, thanks for the kind words though, you know who you are :)

post #28 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post
 I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  My husband grew up in a coal mining town.  The dads got up, walked up the hill to work, came home at the same time.  
 

 

 

banghead.gif   not my family's experience, either with homeschooling or with school.  And you've phrased this in an extremely insulting way.

 

If you want to stick with talking about the great friends your kids have via homeschooling, then you are on solid ground, but as soon as you start generalizing, you aren't.

post #29 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by browneyedmamasf View Post
@ Linda on the move Thanks for your honesty about how you chose how to educate your children. Sometimes I think people see the world as black and white it's not it's grey. I can relate to the whole not being in the car all day thing. We walk everywhere, except ballet class. We are able to give so much to our community by being part of our neighborhood school, I tutor a few kids a couple times of week with reading, I volunteer in her class, and in other classes, I will be starting a girl scout troop this fall for first grade. She loves being part of her community as well, walking with all the kids to school, taking part in community cleanups, and participating at the school neighborhood garden. This choice of mine was also complicated.

 

 

 

We were posting at the same time.

 

It's been a long and sometimes difficult path. One of my children is just gifted, and the other is 2E (she is both gifted and on the autism spectrum.) There's is really nothing I wouldn't do for my kids, but figuring out what are the best things to do for them has been challenging.

 

My signature quote "but everything has pros and cons" refers to homeschooling vs school. There are pros and cons each way, and I do believe that how it shakes down is different for different kids.

 

Although we didn't initially switch to school because we were wanting to be more a part of the community, it was an unexpected and delightful outcome. For us, it turned out that the "homeschooling community" wasn't a community at all, but rather a counter cultural movement that inhibited relationships rather than fostered them. We are part of a community now.

post #30 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

 

banghead.gif   not my family's experience, either with homeschooling or with school.  And you've phrased this in an extremely insulting way.

 

If you want to stick with talking about the great friends your kids have via homeschooling, then you are on solid ground, but as soon as you start generalizing, you aren't.

I found it insulting also, generalizations are a big problem and create huge holes in arguments, logic 101.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

 

We were posting at the same time.

 

It's been a long and sometimes difficult path. One of my children is just gifted, and the other is 2E (she is both gifted and on the autism spectrum.) There's is really nothing I wouldn't do for my kids, but figuring out what are the best things to do for them has been challenging.

 

My signature quote "but everything has pros and cons" refers to homeschooling vs school. There are pros and cons each way, and I do believe that how it shakes down is different for different kids.

 

Although we didn't initially switch to school because we were wanting to be more a part of the community, it was an unexpected and delightful outcome. For us, it turned out that the "homeschooling community" wasn't a community at all, but rather a counter cultural movement that inhibited relationships rather than fostered them. We are part of a community now.

I really appreciate your honesty about how you came about going from homeschool to school and how you feel overall about the experiences from both sides of the fence. Your so right, there are pros and cons from both sides, and it's different for every child.  I have some experince with homeschool families. Some are part of large communities of homeschooling children and some are just a mother and her child. I have different feelings depending on the specific family & circumstance. Personally though I am not interested in being part of either. Maybe more something like a co-op school or something like that, but not homeschool. As a young mama I really do appreciate your honesty, you have no idea :)

 

Michelle

post #31 of 64

I don't really want to turn this thread into a discussion of the pros and cons of homeschooling vs. public school, but as a parent of four children who are variously thriving in school and homeschooling environments I agree that community is very important. If you don't already have a community for your children, you can look to school or to homeschooling to offer that, but either can be problematic depending on the prevailing culture and interpersonal chemistry. We are fortunate that we have had a community for our kids that springs from our involvement in vibrant, caring, inter-dependent small-town life (I know not all small towns are like ours; we are lucky) and from our involvement in music and music education throughout our region. We haven't needed school or a homeschooling group to fulfill a community role for our kids. My kids are a part of both the school and homeschooling worlds in our area, but their true community is something longer-term and more meaningful to them than either of those. 

 

I feel it doesn't have to be a question of choosing the school community, vs. choosing the homeschooling community, a dichotomy which can easily create divisions and comparisons and defensiveness. It's just important to have a healthy community. Full stop. That community may encompass schoolchildren, or homeschoolers, or musicians, or martial artists, or gardeners, or community activists, or 11 a.m. Regulars at the local café ... or a mix of all of them. 

 

Miranda

post #32 of 64

Very glad others were able to provide good resources for you, OP.  That was my only concern, that the curriculum might be limiting, dry, unchallenging and too much like school.  I'm starting to understand that by linear you mean more that it moves in a logical fashion from introducing simple concepts to more complex ideas, not necessarily that it is so structured that she can't explore and meander through it when or how she pleases (i.e., there is a flow to it, but it's not regimented a then b then c).  I hope that made sense.  Your explanation of her preferred learning style also helped.

 

I think the reason this thread started to slide toward homeschool vs. school was first due to the challenge of making time for all of your daughter's after school interests (academic and non-academic) and looking at that huge block of time at school where she might be feeling bored, etc.  I do think it is fair to ask if you've really considered it, if school is worth it, etc. - but certainly not fair to push anything on you.  It sounds to me like you are confident in your decision about what's best for your daughter and family - as you should be! thumb.gif

 

Anyway, I love what Miranda said about community.  The important thing is that it is a healthy, positive environment that your kid thrives in - your relationship with the school sounds lovely.  And it certainly sounds like you are active enough there to know if it's a good fit for your DD!  

post #33 of 64

We homeschool, and for me it is truly less taxing and draining than the effort of buying in (or the dissonance of not buying in) to the public school system, for our district and my specific child. For me, and for the mamas I know, it is consuming, no doubt, but not to the point that school is a better option. In my circle, if parents move to brick and mortar schooling, it is because their children need something different, not the mothers.

 

Linda, I don't mean to undercut your personal experience, but rather to share my experience alongside yours. OP, I think it depends largely on the kind of community established both in the public school and in the homeschool community--and, certainly, it is possible to work toward creating a supportive community wherever you are, but my own experience has been that it is orders of magnitude better to join in a community that feels like home, rather than trying to create one from scratch among people who have different visions, whatever shape that community takes, and then craft learning around that system.

 

I also wanted to be a voice of support for having scaffolding--not so much for the child as for the parent. It's nice if the child can embrace something and have resources generally available--the child is interested in simple machines, and the parent can dig up The Art of the Catapult from the library wishlist, for instance. When DS got on a kick about Platonic solids, it was great to have a few places to look for books, projects, mathy crafts. For us, the mix is a small amount of regular formal work (I have a child who likes to be systematic, so formal copywork, spelling, grammar in small, incremental chunks) --and lots of library books, craft and creative websites (for me). There are some great, great math websites out there, that I am starting to explore, with really rich and interesting ways of exploring patterns and games. I guess, in general, the sweet spot for us is as much formal, interesting work that grapples with real ideas, as possible, with as little structured busywork as possible. Formal work and scaffolding doesn't need to mean, "Sit here and do this worksheet!" A few resources we like: --Jim Weiss's reading of Story of the World, history encyclopedias, Family Math, Historical Connections in Mathematics, Calculus for Young People, Joy Hakim's history of science.

 

Heather

post #34 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by domesticidyll View Post

Linda, I don't mean to undercut your personal experience, but rather to share my experience alongside yours.

 

You aren't undercutting my experiences, you've just had different ones. This isn't something we need to vote and agree on -- we can all be right about what our own experiences are.

 

The line is in when people make generalizations and sweeping statements.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

I don't really want to turn this thread into a discussion of the pros and cons of homeschooling vs. public school, but as a parent of four children who are variously thriving in school and homeschooling environments I agree that community is very important.

 

When a parents asks a question for resources and instead gets post after post about why they should homeschool, I've no idea how else it could end. When they explain why they currently feel that the placement for their child is the most appropriate at this time and are told that it isn't a good enough reason, the thread isn't about support, but proselytizing. The reason the OPer gave was friends, which is part of community building, and she got this response:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends.  I am reminded of a quote from the movie Heathers that goes something like this:  "My parents wanted to move me into high school out of the sixth grade, but we decided to chuck the idea because I'd have trouble making friends, blah, blah, blah. Now blah, blah, blah is all I ever do. I use my great IQ to decide what color lip gloss to wear and how to hit three keggers before curfew."

 

(2) All these things are offered in almost any medium to large city in the United States inside the home and virtual schooling communities.  My children are in either class or practice or Scouts or whatever about 18-20 hours a week, and we don't have time to go to the weekly field trips, Robotics team, classes offering regular group projects, etc.  They do go to plenty of parties.  

 

Here are highlights of the various attempts to convert the mother to homeschooling:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
Alternatively I would keep an open mind about full-time homeschooling. I know your dd really loves going to school when she's engaged, but if she finds less interest in 1st grade she might discover she loves homeschooling just as much, or more!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by christinemm View Post

Hello, I homeschooled my kids from birth. With homeschooling you can do a lot in a short time which leaves the majority if the day for play that is so necessary for brain and social development....
If your daughter learns and remembers so easily then homeschooling would be a breeze for you and enriching for her.
With after schooling academics at home you take time away from doing other things, yet if all she was doing after school was something sub-par like watching tv then it would be better but I bet that is not how you have her spending her time. If you try after schooling you will see how much can get done with 1:1 teaching then you may ask yourself why waste the bulk of a day in school if she can learn more a home with you in a couple of hours!
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

She doesn't know what it would be like; are you familiar enough with her options to convey it to her?  "Home schooling" is not a very descriptive phrase because it is so individual to each family.

.....

 

I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  My husband grew up in a coal mining town.  The dads got up, walked up the hill to work, came home at the same time. 

 

 

 

It's only a debate because some homeschoolers don't seem to respect that different things work for different families. Unless there is respect for other people making different decisions, of course it will end it debate.

 

I'm not arguing that no one should homeschool. I'm arguing that different things work better for different kids, and perhaps we could assume that the mom is right about her own child.

post #35 of 64
Quote:

 

Here are highlights of the various attempts to convert the mother to homeschooling:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

 

Alternatively I would keep an open mind about full-time homeschooling. I know your dd really loves going to school when she's engaged, but if she finds less interest in 1st grade she might discover she loves homeschooling just as much, or more! My youngest dd is 9 and none of her formerly-homeschooled older siblings have been at home with her this year, so last fall she vascillated a little about homeschooling vs. school. However, we've been able to cater more to her individual interests as the year has gone on, and she's had some totally amazing experiences that have made school pale by comparison.

 

Miranda

 

Linda, read that post of mine again. After first making two other school-based suggestions (child-led after-school enrichment, and part-time attendance), I suggested she not discount homeschooling "if she finds less interest in 1st grade..." That's a very balanced post, not an attempt to convert her to homeschooling. I gave two encouraging suggestions based in the context of school and then said that if the child loses interest in school, they could still consider homeschooling as an option. You seem to really have some baggage around this issue. I think it may be clouding your interpretation of things.

 

Miranda

post #36 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post
 I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  

 

I wouldn't say that. We know plenty of lonely homeschoolers who can't find a homeschooling group that fits be it because of giftedness, being the wrong religion or simply not religious, being too liberal, being in the wrong tax bracket, having different social needs and interests, ect. When it comes to finding other gifted children, our homeschooling friends have done exactly what WE have done which is seek connection through interest-based activities. My kids most satisfying social group is theatre and the kids in that activity come from every educational background you can fathom. MANY have the same stories of feeling isolated or ill-suited socially whether they are in school or schooling at home. 

 

What connects people is shared interests and goals. Some find that very easily in school, others through activities, some in their own neighborhood. It really depends on the individual.

post #37 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post

 

I wouldn't say that. We know plenty of lonely homeschoolers who can't find a homeschooling group that fits be it because of giftedness, being the wrong religion or simply not religious, being too liberal, being in the wrong tax bracket, having different social needs and interests, ect. When it comes to finding other gifted children, our homeschooling friends have done exactly what WE have done which is seek connection through interest-based activities. My kids most satisfying social group is theatre and the kids in that activity come from every educational background you can fathom. MANY have the same stories of feeling isolated or ill-suited socially whether they are in school or schooling at home. 

 

What connects people is shared interests and goals. Some find that very easily in school, others through activities, some in their own neighborhood. It really depends on the individual.

In reading what I wrote, I accidentally didn't write what I really meant.  I didn't really mean homeschoolers' relationships to each other in the sense of like, every homeschooler in a particular location has more realistic future adult-type relationships. What I meant is what you are describing ... forming relationships through activities, analogous to adult work (theater, sports, sometimes homeschool classes like Spanish half day programs or day long art schools), not necessarily just with other homeschoolers, but not really just with people you see in your communities, but in intentional communities that come together and break apart.  Homeschoolers sometimes have more time to be in these multiple interest communities.

 

As adults we don't always get to play with our work friends.  Our best friend at the law firm from may commute 30 minutes from the other part of town and we commute 30 minutes from the other direction.  We may have intense friendships with collaborators we mainly see online.  Etc.  We have our communities of work and interest, and then we have our neighborhoods.  Both are valuable.

post #38 of 64

We are probably what is considered "afterschoolers".  I have a rising 3rd grader (read at 3, entered K at middle school reading level & 3rd grade math) and a rising 2nd grader (not as advanced as older DD but at school's suggestion did a midyear skip from K to 1st this year).  I had considered homeschooling but both are very much interested in going to school.  Also, the homeschooling groups availabe to us are not for us for various reasons.

 

Oldest DD was fine with the pace of school until this year (2nd grade).  We met with the teacher & did a few things.  One, we supplied things for her to do in school.  For example, her 2nd grade class did 60 minutes of math.  She had the choice of working ahead in the math book on her own, doing her own math workbook we sent in, or essentially doing anything she wanted so long as it wasn't disruptive to her classmates.  She loves art so I sent her in with a sketch book & some colored pencils and when she finished her math, she worked on that.  I would talk to the school and your DD about what each of them might be willing to do.

 

We don't have a formal afterschooling curriculum but both girls enjoy math so we have both the Singapore math books and we have a membership to IXL online.  These days the IXL seems to interest them most.  One has a passion for history and is doing a correspondence with a relative who is a former history teacher.  We also do lots of outside activities (tae kwon do, piano, some drama and seasonal sports activity).

 

My girls enjoy school for the routine & the social aspect.  Neither is getting a ton out of it on the academic side but that is okay as they have solid foundational skills and have adults in their lives who can guide them in their interests.

post #39 of 64

I would also echo what a lot of people have said...save the after school time for self directed, creative, or active endeavors.  We do homeschool using a set curriculum, and even we don't do parent-driven learning all day.  We do our work, and then the rest of the day, we're free.  Might I suggest doing things more Montessori-styled--taking her interest and preparing her environment (providing choices of activities on her shelf that follow those interests.  If it's space, maybe use the Magic School Bus space science kit with the activities separated onto trays, some solar system books, a model of the solar system kit for her to make, etc.)  

 

Also, maybe finding some fun enriching activities she can choose to do at her leisure--a sports or music lessons class, the Magic School Bus monthly science kit subscription, Little Passports, subscriptions to National Geographic and/or National Geographic for Kids magazines, books with recipes kids can make to make their own snacks, pads of drawing paper and art supplies, etc.  If you add enriching things to her environment, she may choose them and learn if that's what she wants.  She just might want to come home, chill, and play with the neighborhood kids though, and that's ok too.

post #40 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.   

 I'm sorry, but I can't take your opinion seriously after this comment. LOL!  What an amazing statement. May I ask what research backs this up?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting the Gifted Child
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Parenting the Gifted Child › Public School & Homeschool?