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Where to start? Looking for resource recommendations.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone! At this point, I would characterize myself as skeptical towards the concerns with vaccines but ultimately, completely uninformed. What resources would you suggest for getting started on my research? I'm specifically looking for resources that are backed in solid, authoritative research and are timely (which is why I'm re-asking a question that I'm sure was answered in previous years on this board -- new information may have come out since the posts I've found were created). Any suggestions? Thanks!

post #2 of 15

Become familiar with the current vaccine schedule.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-6yrs-schedule-pr.pdf

 

Compare that to past schedules, such as the one for 1983.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/images/schedule1983s.jpg

 

Realize that when adults say they were fully vaccinated and "fine," that they got a lot fewer vaccines than what is on the schedule now.

 

Thoroughly read the package inserts for each vaccine you are thinking of giving.

http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/ucm093833.htm

post #3 of 15
Quote:

Originally Posted by ma2two View Post

 

Compare that to past schedules, such as the one for 1983.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/images/schedule1983s.jpg

Thanks for this link - I've been looking for this for a while.

 

OP, try The Pink Book  -

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html

post #4 of 15

If you're looking for an overview of the mainstream medical point of view, there's a free online course by Paul Offit (a medical doctor who researches vaccines, and has financial ties to the Rotavirus vaccine) which starts next Monday (25th June). A few of us who post here have signed up, and I think we said we'd try to post discussion etc. here a bit too. 

 

Link: https://class.coursera.org/vaccines-2012-001/auth/welcome

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks, all! I did sign up for that class -- I'm curious to find out how time-intensive it's going to be, but it looks interesting nonetheless.

post #6 of 15

Great. Rrrachel and I have also signed up. I think we should have a thread, either here, or on the main vaccination board to discuss and debate what we learn. :)  

post #7 of 15

If you're into checking out some studies and stuff, I'd suggest starting with Wikipedia's Vaccine Controversy page. It sort of summarizes main concerns with vaccines and lists studies you can check out. 

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post

If you're into checking out some studies and stuff, I'd suggest starting with Wikipedia's Vaccine Controversy page. It sort of summarizes main concerns with vaccines and lists studies you can check out. 

That Wikipedia page is extremely biased.

The title implies that it covers both sides of the controversy fairly, but it doesn't. It reports everything from an extremist point of view, minimizing or even not mentioning mainstream, peer-reviewed studies linking vaccines and/or vaccine ingredients with brain damage, autoimmune disorders, bowel disorders, and neurological disorders. It doesn't mention that US Department of Health and Human Services has so far compensated around 2000 cases of vaccine-induced brain damage, as well as vaccine-induced lupus and other autoimmune disorders. It doesn't mention that the Italian and French governments have recently conceded cases of vaccine-induced autism.

One important thing to remember is that if you ask someone whose child had never had a serious reaction to vaccines, they will tell you that vaccines are safe.

But if you ask someone whose child has had a life-threatening reaction, or worse, whose child died from a vaccination, they will tell you that, at least for them, vaccines were not safe, and they wish they could undo their decision to vaccinate.

Also be aware that vaccines have resulted in death to adults as well as to children.
Edited by Taximom5 - 6/18/12 at 5:52pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post


That Wikipedia page is extremely biased.
 

 

The thing about wikipedia is that anyone can edit it. So if you think it's biased, it might be a good use of your time to edit it to make it less biased. 

 

I recently edited the wikipedia page on Mothering Magazine, which I thought unfairly portrayed Mothering as an anti-vaccination site. 

 

(edited to correct typo)

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post

If you're into checking out some studies and stuff, I'd suggest starting with Wikipedia's Vaccine Controversy page. It sort of summarizes main concerns with vaccines and lists studies you can check out. 

along this vein, pro/con lists some pro and con arguments for vaccination.

 

Some of the links they used made me cringe, but at least you can having a starting point for research into some main issues:

 

http://vaccines.procon.org/

post #11 of 15

It's never a good idea to take Wikipedia as your only source. It can be a good starting place or overview, though.

 

An article does not need to treat all viewpoints as valid for it to be "unbiased". Sometimes we get the idea that, for instance, an article about climate change can only be unbiased if they find a climate change denyer to present balance in the article. But putting the two arguments side by side like that presents climate change as a 50/50 debate, which it is not, so it actually misrepresents the view of the vast majority of scientists.

 

It's sort of like that with vaccines. If you want the medical opinion about vaccines, Wikipedia is pretty representative. Not exhaustive, but representative.

 

However, there are other ideas about vaccines, as we can see here! They are represented pretty well here and I'm pretty sure some people can send you some links to some alternate viewpoints if you wish to read them too. There are even a few people in the medical profession who are skeptical about vaccines or the schedule for various reasons--perhaps not a large number, but some.

 

Anyway, I also found a great link about concerns about vaccines from my very own Public Health Agency (Canada). I'm going to start using this link a lot, I think:

 

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/im/vs-sv/factsfigs-eng.php#a3

post #12 of 15

For an alternate viewpoint, I like NVIC.

 

http://www.nvic.org/

 

For a moderate take on vaccines, try Dr. Sears.  I would borrow the book from the library as well.

 

http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/vaccines

post #13 of 15

Here is another con viewpoint from from a group of medical doctors:

 

International Medical Council on Vaccination

 

A bit about them from their website:

 

 

 

 

Quote:

The International Medical Council on Vaccination is an association of medical doctors, registered nurses and other qualified medical professionals whose purpose is to counter the messages asserted by pharmaceutical companies, the government and medical agencies that vaccines are safe, effective and harmless.  Our conclusions have been reached individually by each member of the Council, after thousands of hours of personal research, study and observation.

 

 

 

 

post #14 of 15

FWIW I found this to be very informative.  My DH and I were sitting on the fence when we went to our son's first doc appointment at 5 mos old.  The doc very plainly told us that he did not administer vaccines (but he'd refer us to a colleague of his if we did want to vax).  He told us that Dr. Sherri Tenpenny shaped his view on vaccines and to look her up.  I felt confused about what to do because I was interested in at least doing selective vax, especially tetanus.

 

Anyway I looked her up. Her website is a mess, so I looked up her up on youtube and found this lengthy lecture entitled, "Vaccines: The Risks, The Benefits, The Choices".  It's almost 3 hrs long (which I was grateful for) and it's a bit dated (2004) so she spends a little chunk of time talking about 9/11 smallpox bioterrorism and federally forced smallpox vaccination shrug.gif.  

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdLMeULoujM&feature=related

 

But I think it was a great starting point into what she's about.  As of today I think she's done over 10,000 hours of research, she references the CDC and Merc and really just lays out data and numbers.  Now I can say comfortably that we are not interested in the tetanus vax at all. 

 

HTH! shy.gif

post #15 of 15
I really like the vaccine education center at CHOP. It is a mainstream perspective, for sure, but it addresses a lot of the concerns specifically, which was helpful to me. You can certainly balance it with readings from elsewhere like nvic fairly easily.

http://www.chop.edu/service/vaccine-education-center/home.html
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