or Connect
Mothering › Groups › September 2012 Due Date Club › Discussions › Prepping for Nursing

Prepping for Nursing - Page 3

post #41 of 72
I was so determined to have a successful bf'ing relationship with DD, I think that I read more on the topic than anything else when I was pregnant with her. My favorite book was Breastfeeding Made Simple. I read it last, and it seemed to have all the best information in the easiest to read and refer back to format. I didn't do anything else to prepare, and was very fortunate that DD was a champion nurser from the start. My only problem was ovsupply. Was very resistant to introducing a pacifier, and DD used me as the pacifier...which was fine, except that she would projectile vomit because her tummy was too full. We finally gave in and found a pacifier that she like, and all was fine after that. I was able to donate milk to a friend who couldn't breastfeed (due to medical reasons) and I hope to be able to donate again this time.

I heartily concur with the suggestion to get involved in LLL. I went for several months before DD was born and found the support amazing. Unfortunately, I now live in a desert of all things natural, and there is no LLL meeting in my area at all!
post #42 of 72

This might sound a little backwards, but my preparation for nursing is mostly normalizing it for myself. Since I'm an LC, I rarely see breastfeeding that's going well. I think, for me, it's like I'm an OB giving birth. I am doing my best to really internalize the fact that breastfeeding really is a normal natural thing to do, that I've done it successfully 3 times before, and that I need to default to trusting the process. I end up thinking every little thing is something bigger because that's what I'm surrounded by all the time. This babe has a new dad, though, and said dad is tongue tied, so I have a paranoia about that. I'm seriously considering making sure I have some sterilized blunt tipped scissors on hand.

 

In reality, there's no physical prep that needs to be done. The most important thing for breastfeeding is immediate and sustained skin to skin contact. Sustained skin to skin contact for the first 6 hours can make a bigger difference than anything because a neurotypical baby is going to instinctively know what to do if put in the right environment.

 

We plan to do skin to skin constantly for the first 8 days and then -when people start visiting more in the second week- we're still going to do a lot of skin to skin, but not constantly like for the first week. I have a talk that I give at conferences that is by Nils Bergman called "Skin to Skin Contact and Neonatal Neuroscience". It sounds like more tech than it is. It's really just a bunch of science to show professionals what moms already know. Unswaddle your baby, put him/her in a diaper on your (or your partner's) chest and cuddle under a blanket for as long and as often as possible. Many people do skin to skin for the first hour, then the baby gets weighed and swaddled and dressed and stuff and real skin to skin doesn't happen again. If we don't end up having a homebirth, SO will wear a button up shirt so he can put the baby on his chest without disrobing whenever it's his turn to hold her. The kids will hold her skin to skin and if my mom who will be here wants to hold her, she'll do it skin to skin too.

 

I will say that going to a LLL (or other breastfeeding support group) meeting ahead of time can make a huge huge difference. Go to as many as you possibly can! They love to see pregnant women there! Know what's normal and know who to call if you have any doubt, then don't hesitate to call. It's best to prevent problems and the earlier you fix problems, the smaller they tend to be.

 

Also, anyone can feel free to PM me if they have questions about breastfeeding that I might help with. There's a lot of experience and wisdom here, though, and letters after one's name really only mean that much when it's something unusual or medical, but I'm happy to help anyone if I can.

post #43 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadiMamacita View Post

Since my milk came in so late last time I remember thinking that I should have started trying to pump BEFORE I delivered. what would that do?

Lansinoh was my hero. Would coconut oil work? I have been using that as a general moisturizer for little while.


It's within the range of normal for milk to come in anytime between day 3 and 7, although I will admit that I really think that it's day 5 for someone who had a vaginal birth. Having Pitocin or a C-section can delay some of the hormonal stuff, though, and I'd say by day 7 for someone who has had those interventions. Also, babies whose mothers have epidurals are sleepier and don't coordinate their latch as well for the first couple weeks, so it usually takes a little longer for them to stimulate milk transitioning.

 

I say transitioning because I think it's really, really important to remember that colostrum IS milk. It's not that the baby is going without at first! Their stomachs are literally the size of a marble early on, so s/he really needs so little.

 

Pumping before birth won't help your milk transition sooner because what changes your hormones to trigger lactogenesis (milk "coming in") is the separation of the placenta from the wall of the uterus. The ideal scenario for a fast and full milk supply is a natural birth where the placenta separates completely on its own followed by tons of skin to skin contact, no separation of mom and baby, and a baby who nurses every couple hours or more for the first 2-3 days. All of these things can happen, but often not all of them do. As many of these milk supply maximizing factors as you can include, though, the better.

 

If your baby is having trouble latching or is sleepy or just slow to get keen to nurse a lot, you can pump a bunch on day 2 to help your milk "come in" sooner. Before birth, though, will just give you a bunch of contractions.

 

A lot of people are using coconut oil now. Lansinoh is great for using before feeding a baby because it acts like chap stick preventatively, but other things (various balms and coconut oil and stuff) can all be good after feedings. Some people feel that coconut oil should not be used, though, if there is a family history of allergies. Interestingly, it's often the first ingredient in formula.

post #44 of 72

I guess this has to do with 'prepping for nursing'. I had a question about breastpumps. I have only had a pump with DS and it was a small medela harmony manual pump. It was all I needed back then, I had crazy letdown and DS wouldn't take a bottle after all. So now I have this super-duper Medela Pump in Style (I guess it's the discontinued model from 2007) but no tubing and honestly I have no idea where the tubing would actually go. I mean, one end goes on those little holes at the motor, but the other end? Does it go right into the bottle? Also, does anybody have experience with a used breast pump? I heard not to use them since they are single user only. Any input?

post #45 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by calpurnia7 View Post

Crystal - I'm focusing more on the whole breast more than the nipple, supposedly it keeps everything flowing more and can help with tenderness?  Haven't noticed anything in regards to tenderness, but if it can help keep ducts clear it's worth making into a habit.  I have no interest in nipple massage or stimulation, I figure my baby can get that going when she's here.


Some resources recommend breast massage, but really it's about getting women familiar with and comfortable with handling their breasts. While one should not toughen her nipples ahead of time, prenatal breast massage won't hurt, but it's not really necessary or especially helpful for breast function either. Being pregnant prepares the breasts to lactate. A good latch keeps nipples from getting damaged (at least the vast majority of the time). It's really about letting the system work. Westerners tend to over think the whole thing. I, too, am a fan of starting with "laid back breastfeeding". We cerebral mommas tend to get in the way more than anything!

post #46 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissE View Post

I guess this has to do with 'prepping for nursing'. I had a question about breastpumps. I have only had a pump with DS and it was a small medela harmony manual pump. It was all I needed back then, I had crazy letdown and DS wouldn't take a bottle after all. So now I have this super-duper Medela Pump in Style (I guess it's the discontinued model from 2007) but no tubing and honestly I have no idea where the tubing would actually go. I mean, one end goes on those little holes at the motor, but the other end? Does it go right into the bottle? Also, does anybody have experience with a used breast pump? I heard not to use them since they are single user only. Any input?

 



You need to get a pump kit that includes flanges and tubing. The tubes attach on one end to the pump and on the other end to the flanges. I would suggest taking your pump to somewhere that sells pumps and getting someone to help you. If you have a local place, that is far preferable.

post #47 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissE View Post

I guess this has to do with 'prepping for nursing'. I had a question about breastpumps. I have only had a pump with DS and it was a small medela harmony manual pump. It was all I needed back then, I had crazy letdown and DS wouldn't take a bottle after all. So now I have this super-duper Medela Pump in Style (I guess it's the discontinued model from 2007) but no tubing and honestly I have no idea where the tubing would actually go. I mean, one end goes on those little holes at the motor, but the other end? Does it go right into the bottle? Also, does anybody have experience with a used breast pump? I heard not to use them since they are single user only. Any input?

 

I borrowed a pump last time and will be doing so again.  I don't see any issue with a used pump mechanism as long as you replace all the parts that connect to you.  I used this site for replacement parts and the woman that runs this site is incredibly helpful.  I spoke with her directly to get exactly what I needed:  http://mybreastpump.com/medelareplacementpartspage.html

post #48 of 72

Yeeska, it's so nice to have you as a resource in our DDC thread! :)

 

MissE, some pumps are a closed system, meaning there's no way for the milk to get in the motor or tubing at all.  I know the ameda purely yours is one.  The PIS is sold at BRU so you could take it there and they could get you what you need.

 

AFM, I'm a second timer and *almost* LLL leader so I feel I have a pretty good handle on things.  But IME with DS, I was surprised at how awkward it was at first.  I mean I knew it was natural, and it was amazing to watch DS just start to suck away, but I just had a hard time figuring out how to get all our parts lined up and not feel so awkward with my big BBs and his little face.  I remember just giggling after the birth and the nurse trying to help.  I had oversupply last time, but I fostered it so I could donate milk.  It was a really rewarding experience and I'm hoping to do that again as soon as I can. 

post #49 of 72

Yeeska -- I'll echo Carson's sentiments in saying what a wonderful resource we have in you here!!

 

Nursing is something that I"ve had great and not-so-great experiences with.  With my first two daughters, I was a failure :(  Lack of support and knowledge on my part ahead of time paired with returning to work WAYYYYY too soon created a situation that resulted in failure.  I'm a huge part of the blame because I (so wonderfully ignorant) just figured that since it's *natural* it would happen *naturally* ... but.. it didn't :(  And I had nurses who said, "oh, your nipples are so flat anyway, it just won't work..."... and other sabotaging things.  And... I was told so often that formula was 'just as good' that I bought into it and after just a few days of attempting nursing, quit.  Both times.  And went back to work as the sports editor for our newspaper office at just five and four weeks :(  (luckily, with my parents and MIL in town, dd1 and dd2 were always with family.. but.. it's something I hugely regret anyway).  With dd3, I had quit my job three months before her birth and was absolutely determined to breastfeed.  I read up on it (so much to read! it was SOOOOOO helpful!!!) and looked at pictures of nursing, to normalize it and know what a good latch really SHOULD look like, etc, etc... it was a struggle.  A HUGE struggle.  And it took a FULL six weeks before it finally felt almost 'normal' and that we really figured it out together... but we DID!  We made it work!  And dd3 went on to nurse for nearly 3.5 years!  And then... with dd4... it was a struggle for a few weeks of us learning each other... but.. we got it down... and she's just about 28 months and even though I dried up weeks ago, still nurses to sleep and for a nap.  Looks like I really do need to read up on tandeming!

 

basically... things that are 'natural' don't always come as naturally for some, and I'd greatly encourage reading, looking at pictures, and hanging around nursings moms (LLL, etc) if you (general 'you') can!  I wish we had a LLL here... but... there's nothing for over three hours away :(  ... But!  My friend/chiropractor is studying to become a LLL leader and should be done with that pretty soon!  I'm stoked!

post #50 of 72

I also love the videos Jack Newman has. I heart him.

 

http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=videos

 

 

You guys are sweet!. It's nice to be appreciated, and I always hope to be helpful with anyone who wants to breastfeed. I also know that, though I've been in lactation nearly a decade now, my best education came from my own breastfeeding experience and mother-to-mother support. That's why I know that there are other experienced and knowledgeable moms on here who are also wonderful resources. I'd hate for that to be discounted. Having letters after my name means that I know stuff about more medical things and that my expertise is measurable, but a whole lot of LLL Leaders know as much (or more!) as any IBCLC about the normal course of breastfeeding. Beyond that, I think it's of the utmost importance to emphasize a mother's instincts. That's a wisdom we all have!

post #51 of 72

THank you for your input. I looked at some pictures and saw that one end of the tube apparently goes straight into the bottle. That would answer my question. All I need now is the tubing and one breastshield. Everything else came with the pump, still packaged and everything. What a deal. I saw this pump cost somewhere around 250 bucks (but it's discontinued now).

post #52 of 72
Target usually has medala stuff too.
post #53 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovejeff View Post
... Was very resistant to introducing a pacifier, and DD used me as the pacifier...which was fine, except that she would projectile vomit because her tummy was too full. We finally gave in and found a pacifier that she like, and all was fine after that...

Just curious about which pacifier eventually worked? My last DD used me as a pacifier as well and would projectile vomit.

 

Anyone else have this issue? What did you do?

post #54 of 72

I don't think anyone has mentioned this book yet, but I love Nursing Mother's Companion http://www.amazon.com/The-Nursing-Mothers-Companion-Revised/dp/155832304X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1341339666&sr=8-2&keywords=nursing+mother%27s+companion

 

I preferred this book over Womanly Art as it served as a great "how to" and problem solver when I had questions or issues.  I nursed up to 2 years with my first, and kept going back to it again and again.  I particularly appreciated its writing style, which I found to be clear and concise. I almost never opened Womanly Art, to be honest.

 

For prep, I didn't do anything, and don't plan on doing anything this time around, other than stocking up on cotton nursing pads and making sure my nursing bras still fit.  Oh, and I'd second the recommendation to have numbers for 2-3 LCs on hand BEFORE you delivery, so you can call in a pinch without having to do research.

 

HTH!

Dory

post #55 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamanFrancaise View Post

Just curious about which pacifier eventually worked? My last DD used me as a pacifier as well and would projectile vomit.

 

Anyone else have this issue? What did you do?

I was adamant on NOT using a paci with DS but he was a comfort nurser and just hours after birth I asked for a pacifier. Seemed like it was just what he needed. DD on the other hand refused the paci but also never comort nursed. She used her thumb once she found it about 8 weeks after birth. I sure do wish she had taken to the paci cause she'll still suck her thumb at night.

post #56 of 72
Quote:
Just curious about which pacifier eventually worked? My last DD used me as a pacifier as well and would projectile vomit.

My DD did that. She wanted to comfort nurse a lot but I had oversupply so she would just nurse, throw up, then keep nursing. It worked for her I guess but it only made my oversupply worse since my body stared thinking I actually needed all that extra milk she was throwing up/out every night! (our biggest problem time was the evening "witching hours"). Once I figured out why she was doing that, I started block feeding - basically I let her nurse as often as she wanted but I kept her on the same side for a specific length of time (I think I started with 3 hrs but reduced that as my supply leveled out). That way, she would eventually drain me out and happily nurse and I no longer had to sit with a big towel spread over my lap. 

 

I also didn't want to go the paci route. Then my mom got very sick and I stared having to drive 5+hrs twice a month to visit her at which point I tried the paci thinking it would make the car rides easier. Insert evil baby laugh her. She was only 2 weeks that first trip but she knew "that trick" and would have none of the paci - didn't matter what kind or how much she wanted to nurse. If I tried more than twice, she would just start gagging and vomitting. Oh how I hope this baby isn't such a puker. 

post #57 of 72

I didn't use a paci.  My son is a comfort nurser.  He would stay really latched on, even in sleep.  silly boy.

I would rather he use his thumb then a paci.  1. Thumb is free 2. he'd never loose it 3. i just don't like paci's.

post #58 of 72

I like the new Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition) a LOT more than the old one. They completely re-did the writing style and layout.  It is laid out in sections Preparing for Baby, The First 6 Weeks, 2 Months, Weaning, etc, and then at the end is "Tech Support" with alphabetical listings of problems or topics for more information.  It's a lot better IMO than the 7th edition. 

 

BRC Mackenzie, I used block feeding to get my oversupply down too. I never had a problem with oversupply till my fourth baby :-)  I've had half of my kids take a paci, and the other half not. I'm kind of torn about whether or not to try to push it with this one, because my ones who didn't take the paci have had more orthodontic problems.  As far as nursing goes, I haven't really noticed a marked difference with any of them. 

post #59 of 72

Yeah, the thought of using a thumb never bothered me until the first time we went to the dentist with DD. She was just over two years old and she smiled at the dentist and he said "oh, we have a thumb sucker' without even looking in her mouth. She has a crossbite since her upper jaw has narrowed from the sucking. We encourage her to stop or redirect her but she tells us flat out "I can't sleep without my thumb". She mostly sucks it when she's tired or exhausted and by now she's covering the thumb in her mouth with her other hand or even DH hand when she sits on his lap :). I'm not too freaked out about her sucking it. Everything I read though says that she 'should stop' by the time her permanent teeth come in. That gives us another 1.5-2 years to work with her to stop. To me it seems like she's not sucking it as often at night but then again, I have no control over it since I don't watch her closely at night. I have pulled her thumb out at several occasions and she has a crazy latch on it, like it's in her mouth with a lot of suction on it. Oh well, we will see. DH brought home that nasty stuff to put on her fingernails, she didn't care and I was not surprised. I chew my cuticles when nervous and my mom put that stuff on my hands...didn't bother me either. Once it's off, you can just keep going.

 

I  know we're completely off topic by now. Last year on July 4th (wow, it's been a whole year) I noticed one of DD front tooth changing color. It happened within hours and freaked me out cause I thought if it kept going like that it might just fall out or turn black or what. I have a picture of her when we arrived at MIL house and she's smiling, teeth all white and then later that afternoon it was gray, so weird. I took her to the dentist the day after and he said it was trauma to the tooth. She had hit her mouth on the living room wall about two weeks prior. They did some xrays and didn't see an infection on the root. I was relieved since I thought they had to take it out. Well, it's still in and I'm keeping my fingers crossed. It's funny cause on some days it looks gray, others more brown and then again more yellow on another day. It seems to change color quite a bit.

post #60 of 72

RE: thumb sucking teeth... The dentist told my mom that my teeth looked like Thumb Sucker teeth.  I never sucked my thumb at all.

 

Re: teeth and color change... yeah, i don't know.  glad there is no infection though.

  Return Home
  Back to Forum: September 2012 Due Date Club
Mothering › Groups › September 2012 Due Date Club › Discussions › Prepping for Nursing