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Alternatives to Science Diet M/D for Cats

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

My obese cats that have been on diets their whole lives without success have finally found the cure - Science Diet M/D.  After just a few weeks, I see a HUGE improvement.  For the first time, they have actually LOST weight and they look happier, play more, all that stuff.

I'll keep them on it awhile longer but wondering what I can switch to that may be less pricey but same idea- just in maintenance mode.  Now that the weight is slowly coming off, I don't want to pack it back on.

I use the wet food and want to stay with wet food.

Neither cat was diagnosed with actual diabetes- this was used as a last-ditch effort to get the weight off- and it worked.

Any help is appreciated.  Not sure what to try when I'm ready to switch them off...

Thanks!

post #2 of 14

I've always heard that the grainfrees are the way to go to help cats maintain weight well since they don't have all the extra carbs. Do you have a local pet supply place that carries high end cat foods? Usually the best foods aren't sold at the big chain places.

post #3 of 14

i would find something with a similar amount of calories, grain free is absolutely the way to go (cats are obligate carnivores).

post #4 of 14

Why are you wanting to switch?  M/D is a high protein/low carb diet which is why it is a diabetic diet and would work for weight loss.  Royal Canin/Medi-cal makes a diet called satiety which helps to keep the cat full by using beet pulp (fibre).

Grain free being the way to go is a myth.  Yes, cats are obligate carnivores....but they would eat grasses and the stomaches of herbivores.  Grains are a good source of fibre.

http://www.hillspet.com/healthyadvantage/pet-food-ingredients-myths.html

post #5 of 14

Um that link is from Hills - not exactly the best source for unbiased nutrition info...

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone! Looking to switch only if there's something comparable that is also a bit more affordable. It's worth it if they do great but open to other alternatives. In general, I think the (insert any letter)/d foods are good to hit an issue but not so much for maintenance on-going but that is just my opinion.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by stardogs View Post

Um that link is from Hills - not exactly the best source for unbiased nutrition info...

 I know it is from hills.  You know who has money to do all the testing and food trials? The big companies.  It doen't make the information incorrect.  Pet food companies aren't evil winky.gif http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/

post #8 of 14

I don't think pet food companies are evil. I *do* think that they often only share info that puts their products in a good light. I muuuch prefer resources that are not funded by a specific company.

post #9 of 14

Have you considered raw feeding at all?

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

I wouldn't know where to start with raw - but it is an option.  I'll go look it up..... or if there are quick links, thanks for adding them here....

post #11 of 14

I feed my dog raw (prey model), and have since we got him as a 9 1/2 week old puppy. I don't have much knowledge about raw feeding cats, but I assume, it is just as simple as feeding dogs. A quick google search found these links:

 

http://www.rawfedcats.org/

 

http://rawfed.com/myths/cats.html (found the info of raw feeding dogs on this site very useful when I was researching raw feeding)

 

http://www.ibdkitties.net/rawinstructions.html (some kibble fed cats won't take to raw feeding easily, this article appears to offer suggestions to help the process)

post #12 of 14

My cats are on a high protein low carb diet I feed them EVO

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonegirl View Post

Why are you wanting to switch?  M/D is a high protein/low carb diet which is why it is a diabetic diet and would work for weight loss.  Royal Canin/Medi-cal makes a diet called satiety which helps to keep the cat full by using beet pulp (fibre).

Grain free being the way to go is a myth.  Yes, cats are obligate carnivores....but they would eat grasses and the stomaches of herbivores.  Grains are a good source of fibre.

http://www.hillspet.com/healthyadvantage/pet-food-ingredients-myths.html

 

grass is an extremely low % of their diet so I would not count that as a reason. Also, not all cats eat the stomachs of their kills, for larger animals they usually dont. The stomach content is also fermented, it is not equivelant to adding grains to kibble so it cannot be used to support feeding kibbles full of grains. Fact is cats should be eating grain free high protein diets.

post #14 of 14

You should try some grain free cat foods for your cat.  I have been feeding my overweight cat, Daisy, grain free food (Taste of the Wild dry cat food, Weurva canned cat food, and Raw Advantage raw food) for about 2 years now, and she has been losing weight well.  Its also given her more energy.

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