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July 2012 Book Challenge - Page 2

post #21 of 41

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

 

Quote:
On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy's diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer? 
   As the cops close in, every couple in town is soon wondering how well they know the one that they love. With his twin sister, Margo, at his side, Nick stands by his innocence. Trouble is, if Nick didn’t do it, where is that beautiful wife? And what was in that silvery gift box hidden in the back of her bedroom closet?

 

Great book.  Lots of twists and turns!  Kept me guess until the very, very end. 

 

 

The Boy Who Was Raised As a Dog by Dr. Bruce Perry

 

Quote:
Child psychiatrist Bruce Perry has treated children faced with unimaginable horror: genocide survivors, witnesses, children raised in closets and cages, and victims of family violence. Here he tells their stories of trauma and transformation.

 

Tragic, yet wonderful to watch the transformation of better practices in working with child/adolescent trauma and abuse victims.  I am beginning research for my thesis, so I'm reading a lot of nonfiction on children/adolescent victims of trauma and abuse. 

post #22 of 41

36) "Why Be Happy When you can be normal" by Jeannette Winterson. Wow, what a great memoir. I need to read more books by her. Off to place multiple books on hold at the library.

 

A great, quick little interview with Jeannette below.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12418162

post #23 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post

 

The Shining. No contest. Not only is it my favorite, but in my opinion it is his absolute best ... his third novel and it was the absolute high point of his career, he's never written anything better.

 

I was wondering if you might say that!  I keep meaning to read it, and it keeps getting bumped down the list.  You just bumped it back up the list for me.  I have to finish Neverwhere first. I have read a bunch of his others, but def. not all of them, and I think The Stand is my favorite so far of what I've read.  A lot I read in high school, and I think I really liked The Talisman then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holland73 View Post

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

 

 

Great book.  Lots of twists and turns!  Kept me guess until the very, very end. 

 

 

The Boy Who Was Raised As a Dog by Dr. Bruce Perry

 

 

Tragic, yet wonderful to watch the transformation of better practices in working with child/adolescent trauma and abuse victims.  I am beginning research for my thesis, so I'm reading a lot of nonfiction on children/adolescent victims of trauma and abuse. 

 

Ooh, Gone Girl is on my list!  It sounds so good!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

36) "Why Be Happy When you can be normal" by Jeannette Winterson. Wow, what a great memoir. I need to read more books by her. Off to place multiple books on hold at the library.

 

A great, quick little interview with Jeannette below.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12418162

 

This one just got on my list too!

 

 

Cleopatra by Stacy Shiff is on my bedside table right now.  I've picked it up and put it down twice now.  It's interesting, but slow going.  Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman currently has me sucked it.  And then I have the 2nd of the Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes books next.  I LOVED the Beekeeper's Apprentice, so I have high hopes for this one.

post #24 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

Welcome Nyssaneala and AmandaT!!

 

 

Thank you for the welcome!

 

20. The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway

21. Train Dreams - Denis Johnson

 

I'm still plugging away at Coming Home to Eat. I keep having to put it aside to read books that are due back at the library. I love when all of my hold requests come in at the same time. orngtongue.gif

post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igraine View Post

Amanda T,

 

Yes, I have enjoyed the G Of T series. Eventhough many things are different, I feel that they have done an excellent job capturing the story and the characters. It is a huge project. I am surprised that they have been able to cover as much as they have in one season. These books are so full and rich. I very rarely have reread books. I will probably read these ones over and over again.

 

Very cool middle name for your little girl!

 

I love the show and agree about the changes. Some people I know don't like any changes but I understand certain things have to be adapted for a show vs a book. I also agree about the rereading! We thought about going with Khaleesi for her first name but I'm glad we decided to use it for her middle : )

Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

Welcome Nyssaneala and AmandaT!!

Thanks!

post #26 of 41

A Fistful of Charms, Harrison

 

 

 

Quote:

The evil night things that prowl Cincinnati despise witch and bounty hunter Rachel Morgan. Her new reputation for the dark arts is turning human and undead heads alike with the intent to possess, bed, and kill her -- not necessarily in that order.

Now a mortal lover who abandoned Rachel has returned, haunted by his secret past. And there are those who covet what Nick possesses -- savage beasts willing to destroy the Hollows and everyone in it if necessary.

Forced to keep a low profile or eternally suffer the wrath of a vengeful demon, Rachel must nevertheless act quickly. For the pack is gathering for the first time in millennia to ravage and to rule. And suddenly more than Rachel's soul is at stake.

 

 

This series gets better with every installment.  Rachel's character continues to mature, and we see a more introspective side to her personality, and why she attracts such passionate emotion to her.  In addition, this book is really focused on one "adventure" -- to prevent a pack of weres from gaining possession of a statue that could start an inderland war.  because of this, there's less jumping between the plots, and the one that is here is fully developed.

 

 

A Feast for Crows, George RR martin

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Joffrey, Cersei is ruling as regent in King’s Landing. Robb Stark’s demise has broken the back of the Northern rebels, and his siblings are scattered throughout the kingdom like seeds on barren soil. Few legitimate claims to the once desperately sought Iron Throne still exist—or they are held in hands too weak or too distant to wield them effectively. The war, which raged out of control for so long, has burned itself out.

But as in the aftermath of any climactic struggle, it is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising faces—some familiar, others only just appearing—are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead.


 

 

Another fantastic installment in another great series.  This book focused on several of the characters, and while many reviewers hated the strategy, I actually really liked that I could see what was going on with a smaller group of characters.

post #27 of 41

31. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

32. Bitter Grounds by Sandra Benietz

33. Free to Learn: Five Ideas for a Joyful Unschooling Life by Pam Larrichia

post #28 of 41

37) I also just finished "Feast for Crows" by George RR Martin. See kofduke's comments as I agree with them! What will I do with all my "spare time" when I finish "A Dance with Dragons"?

 

38) Lady and the Tramp, a longer, hard cover version that I did a read aloud with my daughter. She really enjoyed it and so did I. One of my childhood  favorite stories.

post #29 of 41

34. World Made by Hand by James Howard Kunstler

35. Generations: The History of America's Future by William Strauss and Neil Howe

post #30 of 41

39) Flush by Carl Hiaasen. Another read aloud with my kids. These books are really well written, funny and thought provoking for my kids. We have moved onto to "Chomp".

post #31 of 41

36. At Home: A History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

post #32 of 41

For a few Demons More, Harrison

 

Quote:

Despite dating one vampire and living with another, Rachel Morgan has always managed to stay just ahead of trouble . . . until now.

A fiendish serial killer stalks the Hollows, and no one living in or around Cincinnati—human, inhuman, or undead—is safe.

An ancient artifact may be the key to stopping the murderer—a mysterious relic that is now in the hands of Rachel Morgan, fearless independent bounty hunter and reckless witch. But revealing it could ignite a battle to the death among the vast and varied local supernatural races.

Rachel's been lucky so far. But even she can't hide from catastrophe forever.

 

 

The next book in harrison's Rachel Morgan series...I think these just keep getting better.  The characters are getting more developed, and their backstories are crystallizing certain facets of their personality.  The plot is quick moving and enjoyable.

 

Last Block in Harlem, Herz

Quote:
All fire escapes lead back to the same block in Sugar Hill, Harlem- where kids run through hydrants and music blares from stereos plugged into lampposts. When a new resident (the story's unnamed narrator) notices the trash polluting the picturesque streets and tainting the block's beauty, he is spurred to action. However, his best intentions go awry when the clean-up brings media coverage that in turn, sets off a rash of evictions and ushers in an influx of new and affluent tenants. In an attempt to preserve his neighborhood, the tenant mobilizes a grassroots effort to improve the neighborhood from the inside out.

Realizing he has yet again polluted his reality with unintended consequences, his fight to clean up the block evolves into a quest to cleanse his soul. The choices he makes cannot change the past and the secrets that haunt him, but will alter the future for himself, his family...and the last block in Harlem.

 

 

The book started off well...an interesting perspective on our choices, why we do things, whether they are for us or the greater good.  I found the dialogue between the unnamed narrator and his wife to be stilted, but put that aside for the beautiful sense of place that the author provided, and the relevance of the themes.  The second half of the book begins to get a bit rambly, and then the ending is extraordinarily bizarre...

post #33 of 41

22. Chronicle of a Death Foretold - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

post #34 of 41

23) Crossroads of Twilight by Robert Jordan

24) Knife of Dreams by Robert Jordan

25) The Gathering Storm by Robert Jordan/ Brandon Sanderson

 

There's only two books left in the series, and one of them won't be out until January : ( I've been reading this series for 7 months now and I'm going to be finished so soon!

post #35 of 41

The Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian

 

Quote:
The Sandcastle Girls is a sweeping historical love story steeped in Chris Bohjalian's Armenian heritage.
 
When Elizabeth Endicott arrives in Aleppo, Syria she has a diploma from Mount Holyoke, a crash course in nursing,  and only the most basic grasp of the Armenian language.  The year is 1915 and she has volunteered on behalf of the Boston-based Friends of Armenia to help deliver food and medical aid to refugees of the Armenian genocide.  There Elizabeth becomes friendly with Armen, a young Armenian engineer who has already lost his wife and infant daughter.  When Armen leaves Aleppo and travels south into Egypt to join the British army, he begins to write Elizabeth letters, and comes to realize that he has fallen in love with the wealthy, young American woman who is so different from the wife he lost.

Fast forward to the present day, where we meet Laura Petrosian, a novelist living in suburban New York.  Although her grandparents' ornate Pelham home was affectionately nicknamed "The Ottoman Annex," Laura has never really given her Armenian heritage much thought. But when an old friend calls, claiming to have seen a newspaper photo of Laura's grandmother promoting an exhibit at a Boston museum, Laura embarks on a journey back through her family's history that reveals love, loss - and a wrenching secret that has been buried for generations.

 

An absolutely amazing story!  Beautiful writing, all of the characters are so full and rich.  Additionally, it is great to be spreading some knowledge (or at the very least to acknowledge) a tragic historical event that is frequently denied and/or very rarely spoken about or taught in history.     
 

post #36 of 41

37. Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens

post #37 of 41
Thread Starter 

Ooopsies!  I just noticed it's still the July thread.  What do you think folks, should we just have one thread for the rest of the year, or keep up with changing the thread every month?
 

post #38 of 41

January

1. Skipped Parts - Tim Sandlin  (Nook)

2. The Mill River Recluse - Darcie Chan (Nook)

3. I Used to Know That - Caroline Taggart (Nook)

4. Mom Still Likes You Best (audio book) - Jane Isay (Library)

5. The Snow Angel - Glenn Beck  (Library)

6. Hurricanes in Paradise - Denise Hildreth (Nook)

February

7. I Didn't Ask to Be Born - Bill Cosby (Library)

8. From The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E Frankweiler (DS Copy)

9. House Rules - Rachel Sontag (Library)

10. On a Dollar a Day - Christopher Greenslate (Library)

11. Ella Enchanted - Gail Levine (Library)

12. House of Secrets - Tracie Peterson (Library) 

April

13. Victims - Jonathan Kellerman (Library)

June (no May, not much in April)

14. These Things Hidden - Heather Gudenkauf (library)

15. The Weight of Silence - Heather Gudenkauf (library)

16. The Help - Kathryn Stockett (library)

17. Live Wire - Harlan Coben (my copy) - this maybe titled something else as it's the canadian edition from a second hand shoppe

18. Sickened - Julie Gregory (library)

19. Maine -  J. Courtney Sullivan (library)

July

20. Who Do You Think You Are? - Alyse Myers (library)

21. One Breath Away - Heather Gudenkauf (library)

22. Swallow The Ocean- Laura Flynn (library)

23. Dead Reckoning - Linda Castillo (library)

24 Corpse on the Cob - Sue Jaffarian (library)

August

25. Come Home- Lisa Scottoline (library)

26. Save Me- Lisa Scottoline (my copy) second hand shoppe

 

*for those that are following my saga - comically called '2012 the year of change'- living with my mother isn't working, so we are going to head back to AZ soon.  My kiddo isn't doing well nor an I mentally and while AZ isn't all sunshine and rainbows at least my mother isn't there to belittle us.  My father isn't a peach either.

Hopefully AZ will be calm and I will be able to read more.

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post

Ooopsies!  I just noticed it's still the July thread.  What do you think folks, should we just have one thread for the rest of the year, or keep up with changing the thread every month?
 

HI- personally I like new threads each month.  That alone gives me reason to check back over here, but I understand that means *someone* needs to start the thread etc.  I guess whatever makes the server and the mods happy!

post #40 of 41

I'm new to this thread, but I do like new threads every month. 

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