or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Family Safety › Infant Swim Self Rescue - anyone try it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Infant Swim Self Rescue - anyone try it? - Page 2

post #21 of 52
Thread Starter 

Well, we did a lesson already. No crying, no whining, no fussing, no screaming, no begging... my son was just total giggles most of the time. And yes, she took him under water about 9 times. Nothing came by surprise, she explained every step (told him to close his mouth, etc). I think this is going to fit our family just fine. Remember, every child is different. Individual temperments will handle various styles of teaching differently.

 

That said, I can see how some people would not be comfortable with it. Letting children go under water is really scary for some people. And the firm, no-nonsense tone of the lessons as well as the short duration could easily be a turn-off. I'm not sure I would want to do it with a tiny infant who doesn't understand language and can't follow directions. The cost is prohibitive for many people. And I really don't think this method is the best way to introduce pools and swimming.

 

To dejagerw: when I said I want my son to swim correctly, I meant that I want him to swim, not float around with floaties. I don't care exactly how he swims (dog paddling is fine) and I don't care how far he can do it. I don't expect him to do the crawl or breaststroke perfetly at 2.5 years old. But I'm also well aware that kids can learn to swim at young ages. I learned so young that I can't remember ever not knowing how to swim. My son is old enough to learn to swim a few feet and grab a wall. So that's what he's going to learn to do.

post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adaline'sMama View Post

Careful, there are a couple of MDC mom's who have lost kids because of drowning. While I agree that proper supervision is necessary, I think it is unfair to assume that people can always supervise their kids. For example, a few months ago in the rural area where I live a little boy wandered off from a game of hide and seek and was found three days later 2 miles away sitting on a rock in the middle of a creek. For people who live around water, or who are around water often is it really important that they learn to swim. Often times mom's can't keep their eyes in 6 places at once.


We are talking about infants. There is no substitution for proper supervision of a child that young near water so I cannot see the point in putting a child through that.
post #23 of 52

Because sometimes accidents happen and "he should have been properly supervised" is a completely idiotic response and useless to the parents when they do.   

 

I've never done ISR because we don't live by water or visit anyone with pools.  It's not a regular occurrence in my kids' lives.   If we had a river running through our property, or owned a pool, or lived on the ocean?  You bet your right buttock I'd drown-proof my kids.   Because humans make mistakes and I'm not quite so arrogant as to believe that I'm perfect. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post


We are talking about infants. There is no substitution for proper supervision of a child that young near water so I cannot see the point in putting a child through that.
post #24 of 52

we live on a river and i have been thinking about those classes.  by now, though, dd is, i think, developmentally capable of actually learning to swim and not needing the infant classes. 

 

people who have the "lack of supervision" mindset about how childhood accidents occur, i really hope nothing ever happens to disprove your self-righteous point of view, and your kids must be on the mellow and subdued end of the personality trait scale.  yesterday my dd took a stool from one room and moved it into the laundry room and pulled out everything on top while her dad was changing the other baby's diaper.  she's figured out the locks on the doors and is in and out constantly.  a whole village of people couldn't properly supervise her enough to keep her out of trouble.  or are you suggesting we use a leash?

post #25 of 52

I honestly do not understand how teaching your toddler to swim and be comfortable in water turned into abuse.  Ridiculous!  I taught both my girls how to swim by 2.  I stayed by their side the whole time and helped them overcome the fear of getting stuck and helped them find their way to the wall.  While I would never let them swim alone even now, I feel comfortable that if one of them fell in they would be able to get out and the oldest is learning to swim while holding onto someone else.  Again something I've taught her.  The little one will start to learn how to do that as well as soon as she's comfortable with it but for now she just likes her sister holding her and swimming from side to side in the pool.

 

Is it abuse to allow a 9 yr old to learn how to pull someone drowning from the pool?

post #26 of 52

Can't... help... myself... must... add.... two... cents...

 

I doubt anyone disagrees that supervision is Number One at All Times. Total agreement!!!

 

Part of good parenting, in addition to supervision, is planning for contingencies. So even if you supervise your children properly, you put the matches away and all that good stuff. Because even the best parents know that sometimes stuff happens. Kids run off, are out of sight for two seconds, distractions major and minor occur, children are under the supervision of other adults (grandparents, friend's parents, teachers, babysitters, etc.), and so on. Taking steps to ensure the safety of your child goes beyond simply saying "well, I'll supervise him/her, every waking and sleeping moment of the day, without break or handing off to other caregivers, and I'll also never have a second child for fear my attention might be divided."

 

I'm not going to throw stones at every parent who doesn't have their six month old in a drown proofing program, but the attitude that it's ridiculous because all drowning is prevented by proper supervision is... well, it's unrealistic.

 

Most drownings do indeed happen under poor (as opposed to no) supervision. But not all. There but the grace of god go all of us.

 

Suggest another method if you don't like this one. But for crying out loud, stuff the attitude that all parents who lost their child to drowning are at fault, and that it couldn't possibly happen to you.

post #27 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maedze View Post

Because sometimes accidents happen and "he should have been properly supervised" is a completely idiotic response and useless to the parents when they do.   

I've never done ISR because we don't live by water or visit anyone with pools.  It's not a regular occurrence in my kids' lives.   If we had a river running through our property, or owned a pool, or lived on the ocean?  You bet your right buttock I'd drown-proof my kids.   Because humans make mistakes and I'm not quite so arrogant as to believe that I'm perfect. 

I've seen zero research that this has saved any infants lives. Point me towards that and maybe you'll make a believer out of me. I've seen videos of ISR and I really cannot imagine a scenario in which this could be helpful. If there is proof it has saved a life, maybe I could buy into that. Otherwise I think it's a really terrible substitute for supervision. If you're relying on ISR to keep your kid safe, your kid isn't going to BE safe.
post #28 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post


I've seen zero research that this has saved any infants lives. Point me towards that and maybe you'll make a believer out of me. I've seen videos of ISR and I really cannot imagine a scenario in which this could be helpful. If there is proof it has saved a life, maybe I could buy into that. Otherwise I think it's a really terrible substitute for supervision. If you're relying on ISR to keep your kid safe, your kid isn't going to BE safe.

 

NOBODY AND I MEAN NOBODY SUGGESTED THIS AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR SUPERVISION.

 

NOBODY.

post #29 of 52

You wouldn't rely on it to keep your kids safe.  It's a tool  a tool to help your child in a situation that could happen. 

post #30 of 52

You know what? I was totally wrong.

 

The official recommendation is to put your infant into a self rescue course, then rely on it.

 

It will be the best time and money you ever spent! Once your infant has completed the course, you are free to drop him or her off at the pool, lake or ocean and hit the bars! This is your first (and only!) recourse against drowning! Infants who successfully complete the course no longer need supervision! People who take water safety seriously enough to enroll their children in such programs know that they don't need to do anything further!

 

Or, wait... did that sound too ridiculous?

 

Why is this even a point of discussion?

post #31 of 52

I guess I'm more worried about getting in a car accident on my way to an ISR class than I am of my 7 month old finding himself in a situation in which he could drown but would save himself thanks to his newly learned ISR skills. Statistically that seems more probable. To each their own.

post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post

What is the point seriously? There is zero excuse for anything but the type of supervision of young children that would totally prevent anything like this from ever happening. I know someone who experienced these types of classes who remains terrified of water to this day..and unable to swim or learn to due to total panic around water. Also know a family whose toddler drown in a bucket of water. Supervise your kids proprerly around water and you won't have to worry about drowning nor will you have to worry that you're choosing a method of teaching them that has the potential to create fear and mistrust.

 This doesn't sit well with me, while I have mixed feelings about ISR, I also know from experience that you can be eagle eying your toddler near the water and still have near fatal (or fatal ) mishaps.

When my DS was 2 we were sailing, he had his lifevest on (the kids lived in those things) and was about a foot away from me, just out of sheer happenstance he put his little feet on the jib sheet (the line attatched to the sail) and we hit a gust, sail billowed out, sheet rose, and over he went. I had his foot for a second because his lifevest buckle snagged in our protective netting, but he slipped out of my grasp as the boat pitched on the waves. Within 10 seconds he was almost out of sight.

 Fortunately he was a kid who'd been in the ocean since infancy, he lay on his back and let the waves carry him rather than fight them. (which did nothing to reassure me at the time) The thing is, stuff happens, right in front of you sometimes. I don't know a whole lot about ISR, but I do think some sort of water prep should happen with little ones. If my DS had have struggled against the waves he probably wouldnt be here today, they were just too big for such a little kid, even with the lifevest.

 And bottom line is, I was supervising him, sitting a foot away as he babbled on about the big bridge we were coming up on, so yes, supervision is awesome, but on that day, if it were only supervision in play and not DS's ingrained knowledge, or response to the situation, or habit (which is probably more likely ) I think my life would be a whole lot different right now, and not in a good way.

post #33 of 52

Nobody said anything about substitution.  Reading comprehension is your friend, particularly if you intend to be vilely insensitive to those who have lost children. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post


I've seen zero research that this has saved any infants lives. Point me towards that and maybe you'll make a believer out of me. I've seen videos of ISR and I really cannot imagine a scenario in which this could be helpful. If there is proof it has saved a life, maybe I could buy into that. Otherwise I think it's a really terrible substitute for supervision. If you're relying on ISR to keep your kid safe, your kid isn't going to BE safe.
post #34 of 52

There seems to be a lot of mis-information on this thread on how ISR classes are performed so I thought I would post my experience of the classes that my son took.  My son was 2.5 years old when I signed him up for the lessons.  We live in Florida so are around water about 95% of our time.  Practically everyone has a pool, we go to the beach all the time.  I felt it was very important that my son knew how to swim.  I tried the classes at the YMCA and through the local parks & rec which did diddily squat for my son.  I then tried ISR because my friend had enrolled her son in the classes. 

 

The classes were 10 minutes a day, Monday through Friday for 6 or 7 weeks.  The schedule was kind of tedious and it was very expensive but I am very glad I did it.  His instructor did dunk him under water but always held him while doing it, warned him and made it into a game so he was always willing to do it.  She taught him how to hold his breath and she called it "fishface" so he knew when she said it that he would have to hold his breath.  Once he got the hang of going under water and holding his breath, they started practicing going under and grabbing on to the wall to pull up.  She stood very close to the wall.  After they practiced kicking and arm movements she would slowly move farther away from the wall so he would have to start swimming towards it.  He did this instinctively.  He practiced floating on his back and was taught not to move his legs or arms while floating to rest.  Now up to this point he didn't get upset doing the lessons but he did not like the floating at first.  I think it was the water getting in his ears but after a few floating lessons and after he got the hang of it he was no longer upset.  She showed him how to do the transitions from swimming under water to floating on his back and floating to swimming.  She taught him to swim for a few seconds and then flip to his back to rest, flip to swim again, etc. until he could get to a wall to hold on to.  He loved it once everything started coming together.  About half way through the classes he did start to cry BUT ONLY BECAUSE THE LESSONS WERE OVER and he wanted to practice for more than 10 minutes.   The very last week of lessons is when the child is put in the water in different positions to similate falling in.  They do not practice this until the child is very ready.  Then they do it with clothes on and finally with a coat and shoes on.  I can't speak for other people's children but my son loved being flipped in to the pool.  He was so proud when he "graduated" and got a trophy.  He is now 5 years old and has been swimming like a fish ever since.   

 

I can say that these lessons are not for everybody.  If your child is timid or does not trust other people easily I probably wouldn't suggest it.  I probably wouldn't do it for children under 2 years old either.    

 

Never did I rely on the fact that my son knew how to swim.  I'm not sure why people assume that if your child goes through these lessons that you are no longer going to supervise them.  That is absurd.  It is the same reason that you put locks on the toilet seats or buffers on the doors so no little fingers are hurt.  It is just another safeguard to protect your child.

post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post

I guess I'm more worried about getting in a car accident on my way to an ISR class than I am of my 7 month old finding himself in a situation in which he could drown but would save himself thanks to his newly learned ISR skills. Statistically that seems more probable. To each their own.

 

What? I don't understand your point here. First of all, it's really not accurate to imply that proper supervision would have made ALLLL of those accidents not happen. Freak accidents, sadly, do happen sometimes. Secondly? I'm concerned about car accidents AND I'm concerned about the the fact that other kinds of tragic accidents DO happen sometimes (the newspapers are full of them, sadly). So what? Is this a contest? Is it not possible to be concerned about both things?

 

And why is the car thing relevant to this conversation?

post #36 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeegirl View Post

 

What? I don't understand your point here. First of all, it's really not accurate to imply that proper supervision would have made ALLLL of those accidents not happen. Freak accidents, sadly, do happen sometimes. Secondly? I'm concerned about car accidents AND I'm concerned about the the fact that other kinds of tragic accidents DO happen sometimes (the newspapers are full of them, sadly). So what? Is this a contest? Is it not possible to be concerned about both things?

 

And why is the car thing relevant to this conversation?

 

She's saying, if you read her previous post, that there's no rivers, lakes, ocean, stream, pools, other body of water near her, so the likelihood of her child drowing is not something for her to be concerned about. She doesn't live near water and doesn't go to a pool.

post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post

We are talking about infants. There is no substitution for proper supervision of a child that young near water so I cannot see the point in putting a child through that.


And also, we aren't talking about infants. The OP has a 2.5 year old and the classes generally teach ages 6 months- 6 years old. And while I don't think it's safe for toddlers or 6 year olds to not be eagle-eyed while in the water, it does happen.
post #38 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post

I guess I'm more worried about getting in a car accident on my way to an ISR class than I am of my 7 month old finding himself in a situation in which he could drown but would save himself thanks to his newly learned ISR skills. Statistically that seems more probable. To each their own.


Actually, I started this thread and I asked if anyone had used this program which is designed for ages 6 months to 6 years. I said my son is 2.5 years old.

This is NOT just about infants. That's just in the name of the program.

And also, many instructors will come to your home and do the class in your pool. So your point about car accidents is moot in that situation.

Lastly, regardless of your feelings about ISR, implying that a mother who lost her child due to drowning is a bad mom is cold and heartless. Accidents do happen. No one is perfect. Maybe the mom wasn't even in charge at the time (babysitter, father, grandparent, etc).

I agree that constant supervision is crucial. But that's not the issue at hand in this thread.
post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by marsupial-mom View Post


Actually, I started this thread and I asked if anyone had used this program which is designed for ages 6 months to 6 years. I said my son is 2.5 years old.
 

 

 

I'm glad swim lessons are going well for your little one. One of my DD started swim lessons about the same age (different program) and loved them and swims like fish. My other DD didn't start until she was a big older, and ended up with all sorts of issues with the water. With hindsight, I wonder if things would have gone differently for her if we had done something sooner.

 

Although it sounds great to supervise children every second, every seasoned mom knows this isn't actually possible. We've never had an accident near water, but at a family gathering, I wasn't watching my toddler (I was helping with dishes) and she pulled over a table that had a huge, full coffee urn on it. She ended up with scold burns over 40% of her little body. It was horrific. One of the many things I wept about was that the staff at the burn center would judge me as a horrible mother because I had failed to watch my child every minute. I happened while I was washing some dishes.

 

Any mother who feels that we be able to keep both eyes on every child we have for every minute is a fool.

 

I hope that you are your kids stay safe and happy, and the the swim lessons only come to be helpful when he is old enough to be on swim team. thumb.gif

post #40 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaydove View Post

 

She's saying, if you read her previous post, that there's no rivers, lakes, ocean, stream, pools, other body of water near her, so the likelihood of her child drowing is not something for her to be concerned about. She doesn't live near water and doesn't go to a pool.

 

 

Where is this place where there are no rivers, oceans, lakes, beaches, streams, ponds, public and/or private pools etc. anywhere in the vicinity of where you could live?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Family Safety
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Family Safety › Infant Swim Self Rescue - anyone try it?