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What's the Best Route to Becoming a Midwife?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm looking into different midwifery schools/programs and would like some input!  I'm a 20 year old young lady who wants to become a midwife but don't know where to start!  Should I get some "schooling" first or go straight into an apprenticeship?

 

Midwifery School of the Rockies looks like a great program (even though it is pricey) but I haven't heard any reviews on the school.  Has anyone ever done their program??  It is expensive but only takes about one year to complete.  I've seen other schools that are the same price but take up to three years to complete.  I've heard a lot of good reviews about AAMI before. 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 9

One thing I would suggest is not to choose a program primarily based on it being the fastest or cheapest, or even easiest to fit into your life. Choose for quality and then somehow, anyhow, make it work. Go into debt if that's what it takes, move if that's what it takes. Take those pesky science classes. Do you have some post highschool education under your belt?

post #3 of 9

3-4 years is pretty standard, I doubt that you would truly get all of the education that you need as a midwife in a one year program.  Also please do start with your education first and then when you are feeling like you have some understanding of midwifery care look for an apprenticeship, usually a bout 1-2 years into your book studies you will get the most out of your apprenticeship.  That being said much also depends upon the type of apprenticeship you are doing.  If you can find a midwife who has a slow practice and is also good at teaching and guiding, you could start apprenticing within the first year of book studies.  Don't try though to do a busy apprenticeship and your book education.

 

In regards to what program, you need to look at what type of student you are, do you need support and guidance to stay on task in your studies? if so going to actual classes might be best for you.  Are you usually motivated and able to self guide yourself? then a distance at your own pace program may be good.  It is best to know what type of learner you are before investing in a schoool.  Plus look far and wide for information.  Some schools may look like they have good review, but that is mainly because they squash any non favorable ones...

 

Tia Rich

CPM,LDM

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by wlynch4 View Post

I'm looking into different midwifery schools/programs and would like some input!  I'm a 20 year old young lady who wants to become a midwife but don't know where to start!  Should I get some "schooling" first or go straight into an apprenticeship?

 

Midwifery School of the Rockies looks like a great program (even though it is pricey) but I haven't heard any reviews on the school.  Has anyone ever done their program??  It is expensive but only takes about one year to complete.  I've seen other schools that are the same price but take up to three years to complete.  I've heard a lot of good reviews about AAMI before. 

 

Thanks!

 

Do you have any healthcare schooling? I only ask because I was also looking at Midwifery School of the Rockies, and a lot of their programs are condensed because they are built for women who already have a background in healthcare/allied health professions. If you look under their "sample plans", there is one for someone with no prior experience and it states that in this case it would take about 3 years for the schooling.

 

I just mention this so you get an realistic picture. I'm coming from another health care profession and looking at going into midwifery. I'm also close to 40 (yep, I'm old). And even then, I know that this isn't something that you want to rush. Don't worry about an apprenticeship right now -- from what I've been told it's hard to find a preceptor who will take someone who hasn't completed anything. Start with the schooling. You need that background knowledge before jumping into the hands-on (aka: "fun") part of the midwifery.

 

I agree with the PP, in that you need to look at your learning style when choosing a school. Don't do the online school unless you are a self-motivated and organized person. It's so easy to let the work slip when you don't have someone personally reminding you of and asking you for the work. You're in such a great position with your age to look into an on-campus program where you could do your coursework and clinicals in one place. Or, have you thought about CNM? If you have a high school diploma you could start your BNM course work and then continuing onto a specialty in nurse-midwifery. Even if you have a GED, you could look at going to a community college for you RN and then doing some extra work in an online midwifery (CNM) school. 

 

Finally, if you do want to get in the thick of birth right away, can I suggest training as a labor doula? You can get some birth experience (support during labor and observation) while you complete your schooling for midwifery.

 

Good luck! I hope you find something that works for you. Just remember (and this comes from someone who continues to change careers), you have all the time in the world to do this. There is no need to rush it. I know you want to just get in there and start, but please believe me when I say that you want to be totally comfortable with that you're doing before diving in. The 2-3 years spent in coursework seems like forever, but will be so beneficial to you when it comes time to attend birth. There is so much more to midwifery that catching the baby!

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks so much to everyone's input and suggestions! I would much rather do an online/correspondence course as apposed to an on campus school.  I was homeschooled all the way through high school so am very good at self disciplining myself to study and staying on course.  That shouldn't be a problem. 

 

I'm actually studying nursing right now but not sure if I will go all the way through to getting my master's degree to become a CNM.  That will take a good 7 years of college and at this time it doesn't look like that will be feasible.  But I hope to continue and get my RN and over time (maybe later down the road) get my master's.  For now though (even if it's just self-study) I would like to get going with my midwifery studies and education.  "Nursing" in and of itself is not what I want to do, I want to ultimately be a midwife.  So I want to start at least some training/education now and not have to wait till I start master's studies.  I might even forfeit becoming a CNM and become a CPM instead.  (Which is what I'm leaning towards) 

 

I am doing doula training right now and am enjoying it.  I'm getting closer to finishing it but still have to attend a few births before I get certified.

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie8681 View Post

One thing I would suggest is not to choose a program primarily based on it being the fastest or cheapest, or even easiest to fit into your life. Choose for quality and then somehow, anyhow, make it work. Go into debt if that's what it takes, move if that's what it takes. Take those pesky science classes. Do you have some post highschool education under your belt?

 

I love this, as it's something I came to the conclusion of myself recently.

 

Wlynch4, I'm just starting on this path too.  It's so exciting, isn't it?  I have a few years on you though, as I'm turning 31 in 2 weeks.  And I've wondered how I'm going to get through all the schooling, but I have faith that it will all work out because this is something I really want. 

 

I sat on and thought about CPM vs CNM for awhile too.  And I fully admit CPM was at first more attractive due to the fact that I could get to the end goal sooner, but I realized in my heart I really want to go all the way and become a CNM, so one step at a time.  Anything that requires time and effort is worth it.  You are very lucky to know your dream at your young age.  :-)  Good luck to you!!

post #7 of 9

Phoenix~Mama, I see you've got a couple babies! That's awesome. I just wanted to give you some preemptive support about going down this path with children. That wasn't my experience, but my CNM graduating class was gifted with several mamas, one of whom had a baby during her last year. (Now that's dedication!) You can do it!

post #8 of 9

Thanks Katie.  I'm lucky in the fact that my babes will be at older ages by time I hit the harder parts of schooling/clinicals.  I have faith it will all fall into place as it should.  :-)
 

post #9 of 9

Come to the Midwifery Today Conference that's coming up next spring! There are usually representatives from several schools there and you'll meet lots of other students and practicing midwives. www.midwiferytoday.com

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