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First World Problems. - Page 3

post #41 of 123

I can't find glasses frames that I really like.

post #42 of 123

Back when we had older TVs, if I knew what channel it was on when I turned it off, I could hit power, then the channel up/down the correct number of times, and sit down, without having to wait for the screen to turn on. Same with input. I could hit power, then input the correct number of times to switch it from tv/dvd. Now that we have a fancy HDTV flat screen, I have to wait like, *5 seconds* for it to fully turn on before the input/channel buttons will "work". The wait is agony!

post #43 of 123

Also, I can't run my dishwasher and my washing machine at the same time.  (Or I end up with a flood in the basement.)  

post #44 of 123

My homemade ice cream freezes weirdly. I freeze the mixer as indicated in the user guide, I chill the mix, have a nice 3:1 heavy cream to reg. milk ratio, but after a few hours the ice cream is rock hard and has a grainy texture. I don't get those smooth scoops that Haagen Dazs provides. Grrrrr!!!!

post #45 of 123

WittyNameHere: Have you tried adding a tablespoon or so of alcohol to the mixture? It helps the ice cream stay soft and creamy. Just use vodka if you don't want an alcohol taste, or something yummier - rum, Kahlua etc.

 

If I don't add alcohol (and I usually don't, TBH, although whiskey goes well with butterscotch!) my ice cream gets fairly hard - which I don't mind, I just leave it out for a few minutes before scooping - but it's nice and smooth, not grainy. Hmm. That's odd. I know too much cream can give ice cream a weird mouthfeel, which is why David Lebovitz uses a lot of egg yolks for some of the fat content; not sure if that'd give it a grainy texture per se, though.

 

Have you tried any David Lebovitz recipes? He really is fantastic. The Perfect Scoop is his book, or there are tons of free recipes on his site (or floating around on various food blogs). I've been making homemade ice cream for a couple of years now, and I'm very wary of any recipes that aren't his, just because his always taste so amazing! I highly recommend trying one of his and seeing if it solves your texture problem.

 

Or your freezer could be too warm, maybe? If things freeze more slowly they get bigger ice crystals in 'em... right?

 

Hmm. It might be a first world problem, but that doesn't mean it can't be solved! Go thou forth and experiment! And report back, I'm curious. :p

post #46 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magali View Post

A Kelvinator whose thermostat is off by 70-150 degrees, so I pretty much just play "pick a temperature..any temperature"  when I bake.  

 

You can buy an oven thermometer for a few bucks at Target. My oven is off by 75-100 degrees too so I rely heavily on my oven thermometer. 

post #47 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

WittyNameHere: Have you tried adding a tablespoon or so of alcohol to the mixture? It helps the ice cream stay soft and creamy. Just use vodka if you don't want an alcohol taste, or something yummier - rum, Kahlua etc.

 

If I don't add alcohol (and I usually don't, TBH, although whiskey goes well with butterscotch!) my ice cream gets fairly hard - which I don't mind, I just leave it out for a few minutes before scooping - but it's nice and smooth, not grainy. Hmm. That's odd. I know too much cream can give ice cream a weird mouthfeel, which is why David Lebovitz uses a lot of egg yolks for some of the fat content; not sure if that'd give it a grainy texture per se, though.

 

Have you tried any David Lebovitz recipes? He really is fantastic. The Perfect Scoop is his book, or there are tons of free recipes on his site (or floating around on various food blogs). I've been making homemade ice cream for a couple of years now, and I'm very wary of any recipes that aren't his, just because his always taste so amazing! I highly recommend trying one of his and seeing if it solves your texture problem.

 

Or your freezer could be too warm, maybe? If things freeze more slowly they get bigger ice crystals in 'em... right?

 

Hmm. It might be a first world problem, but that doesn't mean it can't be solved! Go thou forth and experiment! And report back, I'm curious. :p

 

Reporting back. Smokering has solved my ice cream problems!!! A little bit of vodka kept my ice cream nice and creamy. A lot of Baileys made just about the best soft serve-type of faux Wendys frosty ever. And the Lebovitz site? Wow. That went into my "Recipe Porn" folder in Chrome. Thanks a million!!!!

post #48 of 123

I've commented several times to dh that we have a problem that's such a First World problem that it almost goes beyond that.


Our pantry is too small to hold all our food (mostly dried and canned beans, canned tuna and tomatoes, nuts, pasta, dried fruit, baking supplies, etc.). It's frustrating, and it drives me crazy on a regular basis, and yet...it's a position that most of the world's population can't even begin to imagine being in, let alone seeing as an issue.


I've also been thinking of starting to do some canning, but have no idea where I'd keep the finished products...again, definitely a First World problem.

post #49 of 123
Quote:
Reporting back. Smokering has solved my ice cream problems!!! A little bit of vodka kept my ice cream nice and creamy. A lot of Baileys made just about the best soft serve-type of faux Wendys frosty ever. And the Lebovitz site? Wow. That went into my "Recipe Porn" folder in Chrome. Thanks a million!!!!

Yay! My work on earth is done. *ascends to a higher plane*

post #50 of 123
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I've commented several times to dh that we have a problem that's such a First World problem that it almost goes beyond that.


Our pantry is too small to hold all our food (mostly dried and canned beans, canned tuna and tomatoes, nuts, pasta, dried fruit, baking supplies, etc.). It's frustrating, and it drives me crazy on a regular basis, and yet...it's a position that most of the world's population can't even begin to imagine being in, let alone seeing as an issue.


I've also been thinking of starting to do some canning, but have no idea where I'd keep the finished products...again, definitely a First World problem.

You bring up a good point that I never even considered!  Our kitchen is tiny (we actually removed cabinets in order to fit a table in it).  I would love to do some canning.  We grew up doing canning at the end of every summer and I miss it, but my parents had a big house with a basement for storage.  I never really thought about the lack of space as a First World Problem but now that I think about it, it really is.  The fact that I'm bemoaning that I can't fit more food into is really only a problem that comes from abundance. 

 

One thing that bothers me, though, is that we are probably less frugal than we can be due to the small space.  I can't really buy in bulk and thus my cost of living is probably higher than it should be. 

post #51 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatsCradle View Post

You bring up a good point that I never even considered!  Our kitchen is tiny (we actually removed cabinets in order to fit a table in it).  I would love to do some canning.  We grew up doing canning at the end of every summer and I miss it, but my parents had a big house with a basement for storage.  I never really thought about the lack of space as a First World Problem but now that I think about it, it really is.  The fact that I'm bemoaning that I can't fit more food into is really only a problem that comes from abundance. 

 

Exactly. It's not really the small space that's the First World problem, but the fact that I complain, because I can't get more food into it. It feels like a problem of scarcity (living space), but it's really a problem of abundance (more food than I can fit). I try not to complain too much.

 

One thing that bothers me, though, is that we are probably less frugal than we can be due to the small space.  I can't really buy in bulk and thus my cost of living is probably higher than it should be. 

 

This happens here, too. We do buy some things in bulk, but there are many things I'd like to buy in bulk (and have, in other places I've lived) that I simply can't...unless I want to start going Hoarders style and keeping canned tomatoes under my bed. I don't.

post #52 of 123
This Saturday morning, DS has a soccer tournament, DD1 has horseback riding, and DD2 has gymnastics..... All at the same time! It's a scheduling nightmare. How's that for a first world problem?
post #53 of 123

My first world problem for today -- there's no school tomorrow so one of my kiddos wanted to invite a couple of friends over to spend the night. Which was fine, but it was all very last minute with NO planning and I'm pondering going out and getting them snack food. But what to get? Cookie dough? A brownie mix? Nothing and just let them eat the fruit and healthy foods we have on hand? I made a huge pot of soup, which we all like, but what if they didn't? Should I order a pizza too? Ice cream?

 

Why do I feel that if extra kids are here, we need special foods with lots of refined carbs in order to be a "fun" mom? Why do I worry about whether or not these kids, who obviously get plenty to eat, will go hungry with free range of my refrigerator and pantry?

 

I do believe that the amount this is vexing me is a testament both to the fact that I'm a first world mom and that I don't have any real problems.

post #54 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

My first world problem for today -- there's no school tomorrow so one of my kiddos wanted to invite a couple of friends over to spend the night. Which was fine, but it was all very last minute with NO planning and I'm pondering going out and getting them snack food. But what to get? Cookie dough? A brownie mix? Nothing and just let them eat the fruit and healthy foods we have on hand? I made a huge pot of soup, which we all like, but what if they didn't? Should I order a pizza too? Ice cream?

 

Why do I feel that if extra kids are here, we need special foods with lots of refined carbs in order to be a "fun" mom? Why do I worry about whether or not these kids, who obviously get plenty to eat, will go hungry with free range of my refrigerator and pantry?

 

I do believe that the amount this is vexing me is a testament both to the fact that I'm a first world mom and that I don't have any real problems.

 

I think those are factors. But, I honestly think that hospitality related food issues are pretty common. I don't freak too much about this stuff, but a potluck or "bring a dish to share" events freak me out. I bring the same thing to every homelearner's meeting, because I already know most of them like it, and I hate bringing something that will bomb.

post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

My first world problem for today -- there's no school tomorrow so one of my kiddos wanted to invite a couple of friends over to spend the night. Which was fine, but it was all very last minute with NO planning and I'm pondering going out and getting them snack food. But what to get? Cookie dough? A brownie mix? Nothing and just let them eat the fruit and healthy foods we have on hand? I made a huge pot of soup, which we all like, but what if they didn't? Should I order a pizza too? Ice cream?

 

Why do I feel that if extra kids are here, we need special foods with lots of refined carbs in order to be a "fun" mom? Why do I worry about whether or not these kids, who obviously get plenty to eat, will go hungry with free range of my refrigerator and pantry?

 

I do believe that the amount this is vexing me is a testament both to the fact that I'm a first world mom and that I don't have any real problems.

 

I'm a total jerk. I have the food I have. If you don't like it that isn't my problem.

post #56 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

My first world problem for today -- there's no school tomorrow so one of my kiddos wanted to invite a couple of friends over to spend the night. Which was fine, but it was all very last minute with NO planning and I'm pondering going out and getting them snack food. But what to get? Cookie dough? A brownie mix? Nothing and just let them eat the fruit and healthy foods we have on hand? I made a huge pot of soup, which we all like, but what if they didn't? Should I order a pizza too? Ice cream?

 

Why do I feel that if extra kids are here, we need special foods with lots of refined carbs in order to be a "fun" mom? Why do I worry about whether or not these kids, who obviously get plenty to eat, will go hungry with free range of my refrigerator and pantry?

 

I do believe that the amount this is vexing me is a testament both to the fact that I'm a first world mom and that I don't have any real problems.

i totally hear you. i have to do this myself. esp. the ones who live near us. when dd goes over for a sleepover there, sometimes she comes home to eat a quick snack coz she doesnt like their food.

 

i've seen other kids do the same when they dont like the food we have.

 

these are still tweens so sometimes they get a kick out of cooking and eating whatever is in the fridge AND eating that. meat and flour are two things that are rarely in my house. so far both genders have enjoyed cooking as a fun thing to do. 

 

if i was in your place, i'd order a pizza too. i'd rather do junk food that we dont eat since i really dont like kids going hungry on my watch.

 

and really if i expect others to respect my food values,  i should do the same. 

 

that is how junk enters my home. the good part is dd is old enough to make a wise choice (which means a little, but not too much). even if she didnt she'd have to pay for it. 

 

fun mom or not - i feel i eat v. differently than most other homes. that is why free reign in our house is very different than free reign in someone else's home. 

 

however i will say everyone who comes to my home knows to do the one no ty bite. at some point they all eat something they WOULD eat so they tend not to refuse anything. 

 

one thing i have a problem with. i really try to not include food in the fun aspect of the evening. but every. single. time. the first thing on their list for a sleepover is what food to eat. 

post #57 of 123

I'm really glad that so many people could relate to my little drama!!!  I felt so silly, but your post made me feel better about it!

 

I talked to the girls and just laid it out -- we didn't plan for this, but I'm very open to pretty much whatever they want. We live 10 minutes from a grocery store, and I'd be happy to run up and buy food. They universally turned down pizza, but felt that brownies and marshmallows would create the perfect evening. And I made waffles, bacon, and strawberries for breakfast, which they felt was party food.
 

Growing up, my family NEVER entertained and I seldom brought friends over (because I was a little afraid for them and embarrassed about how dysfunctional my home life was). As an adult, I learned to entertain and have people over, and while I find it a little stressful, I also enjoy it. I usually spend a lot of time thinking it through and planning. 

 

I really want my kids to feel comfortable having friends over. It's so opposite of how I felt growing up and it's one of the things I want to give to them. None the less, it kinda throws me off.

 

The way we eat is a little weird. I'm totally fine feeding my kids brown rice and black beans for dinner (it's good for your colon!) but I really don't want other children to not want to come over because they are hungry and our food is weird, or for my DD to feel embarrassed and not want to invite her friends due to food.

 

(I usually make fruit salad for potluck)

post #58 of 123

I do fruit salad for some things - we had a "block party" type barbecue in our townhouse complex on Labour Day weekend and I brought a fruit salad for that.

 

For homelearners, since it's a really crunchy group (I am, by far, the most mainstream person who attends, in pretty much every respect), I bring my kale/quinoa salad. Then, I bring some fruit for the kids, because several of the kids don't like my salad.

 

Well, that, or I make kale chips. But, it takes a long time to make a big batch of kale chips, and I don't always feel up to making that big a time commitment in the morning.

 

We always had people over when I was growing up....my parents had friends over and we had other kids over a lot, too. But, dh and I aren't as sociable (well, I'm probably about as sociable as my mom was, but I have no garden to escape to - dh is less sociable than me, and my dad was/is a total extravert). The kids have friends over quite a bit, but we rarely have adult friends over. When the kids are here, I'm usually good, because we usually have a good stock of fruit, and that goes over well.


Edited by Storm Bride - 10/4/12 at 4:37pm
post #59 of 123

My first world problem of the day: I REALLY don't feel like packing for our (parent-sponsored) trip to Hawaii on Saturday. Just thinking about all the things we need to take... ugh. And yes, I feel stupid and spoiled for feeling this way!

post #60 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I've commented several times to dh that we have a problem that's such a First World problem that it almost goes beyond that.


Our pantry is too small to hold all our food (mostly dried and canned beans, canned tuna and tomatoes, nuts, pasta, dried fruit, baking supplies, etc.). It's frustrating, and it drives me crazy on a regular basis, and yet...it's a position that most of the world's population can't even begin to imagine being in, let alone seeing as an issue.


I've also been thinking of starting to do some canning, but have no idea where I'd keep the finished products...again, definitely a First World problem.

 

First World Problem: We have too much food.
Recently we were given boxes and boxes of food by some family members. (Dropped off without asking if we wanted it.) We actually have lots of storage space. Every available food storage space in my house is full and there are still boxes of food that aren't put away.

 

I don't think many people would see this as a problem even in the First World. My parents would have been delighted to have this much food in their house and there are those people who buy lots of stuff in bulk whenever they get a good deal and feel great about having a huge stockpile. I don't feel comforted or secure having this much food stocked in my home. I feel kind of disturbed by it.

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