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age of doula

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

How old were you when you started being a Doula? I'm afraid if I start too young, I might not get hired by many people because I'm "too young." I was thinking it'd be more of a goal for in my 30's.

post #2 of 12

I began training when I was 19, right after the birth of my DS. 

Being a young mom, I'd prefer someone closer to my age as a doula :)

post #3 of 12

I first started training when I was 22 and then got back into it again when I was 35.  When you are younger you have more energy and that can be a real asset.  Lots of doulas don't have children of their own but have a passion for birth.  I think it's the passion that counts, not the age.  I wouldn't let my age stop me if I were you.  I sometimes wish I had stuck with it when I was younger because my expenses were really low then and it would have been easier for me to be self-employed and starting off in a new career than it is now.

post #4 of 12

I was 30.  Some people will want to hire an older, more maternal figure - someone who will be sort of like having a mom or grandma around.  Others will feel just as comfortable with a younger woman who they connect with as a friend or sister.  Some will want a doula who has had her own children; others won't care.

 

If you want to do it now, go for it!
 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaskanmomma View Post

I began training when I was 19, right after the birth of my DS. 

Being a young mom, I'd prefer someone closer to my age as a doula :)

That's a good point! 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pokeyAC View Post

I first started training when I was 22 and then got back into it again when I was 35.  When you are younger you have more energy and that can be a real asset.  Lots of doulas don't have children of their own but have a passion for birth.  I think it's the passion that counts, not the age.  I wouldn't let my age stop me if I were you.  I sometimes wish I had stuck with it when I was younger because my expenses were really low then and it would have been easier for me to be self-employed and starting off in a new career than it is now.

Energy is a good point, too. It's not easy being "on-call" 24/7 when the need arises and staying up for a 24+ hour birth. But as of now I have young kids, so me being away for extended periods of time just isn't possible. 

post #6 of 12

If you have young kids now it does make sense to wait until they are older and maybe in school.  You would need to have emergency childcare on call at all times.  Have you considered postpartum work?  That's something that is easier to schedule.  It may be an option for you to build experience until you are ready to go full-time into birth work.  Just a thought.  Good luck on your journey!

post #7 of 12

I'm 23 now and currently doing my training, fortunately I have lots of family and support for when I have to be away from my son but I am still nervous about not getting hired because of my age. Hopefully people will look at the benefits of having a younger doula. I have such a strong passion for maternity and child birth so hopefully that will shine through and help me get some clients!

post #8 of 12

I was 17 when I took my doula training, and am now a student midwife at 19.

 

I like to think there are different "types" of doulas/midwives. Some people prefer a grandmotherly figure, some a motherly figure, others a sister/friend close to their age. I may not be the doula or midwife for everyone being so young, but I am the right person for SOME, and that's what matters.

post #9 of 12

I'm 26 and I'm a doula--and I don't have any of my own babies. That is much more of a hurdle than my age, I think. But it's not stopping me smile.gif

post #10 of 12

I was 22 when I first started attending births. My first few years, I was volunteering my services so it was hard for anyone to turn down free support.

 

I think having reliable, on call childcare is a bigger obstacle. That can be so incredibly tricky.

post #11 of 12

I'm not a doula, but if I were to hire one, I'd want one who has been through childbirth herself, and I wouldn't care if she was "too young". Not that I'd never hire one who hasn't had a baby before, but if I did, I'd look for someone older who has attended more births. Does that make sense? shrug.gif
 

post #12 of 12

I started working as a doula when I was 25 and my age didn't seem to get in the way.

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