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Mothering › Groups › November 2012 Due Date Club › Discussions › So when do call your care providers?

So when do call your care providers?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
We're all getting closer to the 'big event' here and I'm wondering what you'd have to be experiencing to call your ob/midwife etc.
post #2 of 10

I call my midwife to let her know labor has started kind of as an FYI.  Since I have given birth the last 3 times in the middle of the night, I would think it's a nice gesture to sort of let her know she might not be getting a ton of sleep that night.    Then I call again when the contractions are VERY painful and I'm having trouble standing/talking through them and we leave.  I have a 45 minute drive to the hospital and she has about a 25 minute drive, so I don't want to wait too long.  My second birth was a "close call"....or has my husband puts it "worst car ride ever".

post #3 of 10
Last time my water broke at 1 am and contractions started at 2 am, coming every 3 minutes. Called midwife to let her know, then called her to come around 7 am. DS wasn't born until 10:22 pm though!

This time I'll still call with a heads up but won't ask her to come until contractions are pretty painful and I have trouble getting through them.

Fwiw, my midwife was happy to be there when I called her. As a first time mom she wanted ME to have what I needed, not what was logical smile.gif Her being there was what I needed due to contractions being so very close from the very beginning.
post #4 of 10
I agree... call when you think you are in labor. It's nice for them to have a heads up. Reasons you would think you are in labor would be things like contractions that are coming consistently (even at 10-12 min apart) and might feel stronger than BH contractions or if your water has broken.

If you plan to go to the hospital or a birth center, 1st time moms should head over when contractions are about 3 to 5 min apart, lasting about a min, for about an hour.2nd time plus moms should head out when they are 5-6 min apart, lasting about a min, for about an hour. Of course if you have a very long drive or other circumstances, you should take that into account as well, but this is a general guideline.

You can always ask at your caregiver at your next appointment what his/her preferences are.
post #5 of 10

I'd say it depends on your provider.  With a homebirth midwife, it's good to be polite and give her a heads up when you have regular contractions.  With a hospital, I really wouldn't bother letting them know until you walk in the door, and you want to be seriously dealing with the contractions at that point or you risk having the clock started on your labor too early (which could lead to unnecessary pitocin, etc.).  Or at least be sure that if your labor slows or stalls, you have the option of going home again and restarting the clock when you come back.  I have heard that in a lot of hospitals you only have 12 hours to deliver after you come in in labor, so you might want to check on the policy at your hospital.

 

With my son, I discovered the joy (?) of doing my own internal exams as labor progressed.  It was the coolest thing ever to feel the amniotic sac, but when I realized how much of it I could feel I knew it was time to go in.  Of course that wouldn't work as well if your water broke early.

 

The Bradley book says to stay home until you're not smiling anymore.  Actually, that book has a great "emotional map of labor" that is really helpful in knowing when to leave.  I remember particularly the story of a husband who was going to take a picture of his wife on the doorstep on the way to the hospital, but when he saw her confident smile, they went back inside and labored for several more hours before leaving!

 

Now I feel like all I do here is recommend books, so I'll hop off.  smile.gif

post #6 of 10

I agree with wendelberry -- I let my HB midwife know when I THINK I'm in labor (and can always call her back if things slow down).  If you're having a hospital birth, you can call when you leave for the hospital, but around here anyway you just get the OB or midwife on call, so they don't really need to know until you're there.

 

The situation I hate to see as a doula is when a mom's water breaks before labor begins, and she calls the hospital and they tell her to come right in (whether she's having contractions or not).  Once she's there, they typically will pressure her to start Pitocin if contractions haven't started within 2 hours.  There's a good article on this stupid practice here: http://midwifethinking.com/2010/09/10/pre-labour-rupture-of-membranes-impatience-and-risk/, which I will be passing onto clients in the future to hopefully convince them to NOT go in until contractions are as described above.

post #7 of 10
Quote:

Originally Posted by jillc512 View Post

 

The situation I hate to see as a doula is when a mom's water breaks before labor begins, and she calls the hospital and they tell her to come right in (whether she's having contractions or not).  Once she's there, they typically will pressure her to start Pitocin if contractions haven't started within 2 hours.  There's a good article on this stupid practice here: http://midwifethinking.com/2010/09/10/pre-labour-rupture-of-membranes-impatience-and-risk/, which I will be passing onto clients in the future to hopefully convince them to NOT go in until contractions are as described above.

 


This is what happened with my last baby.  My waters broke at 35 weeks and I went in.  I wish I hadn't, since labour hadn't begun and every extra day baby could have had inside would have been good.  OTOH, I can't beat myself up about it too much.  My usually very active baby had grown very quiet and my waters continued to gush, so I couldn't be sure they were replenishing quickly enough to maintain adequate levels.  I suppose I could have gone in for a CTG and scan to make sure things were OK, but it's nearly impossible to go into hospital without them wanting to do an internal and insisting you stay in. And then the whole fear-of-infection scenario, and voila, labour is being induced. <sigh>

The only birth where I had to call the MW was my third, a HB, and I didn't call until the contractions were so intense and close together, I couldn't talk anymore, just swear under my breath (I don't make much noise in childbirth, just swear quietly, LOL).   My first birth was induced due to preeclampsia and my second, I didn't realize I was actually in labour until it was almost too late. I was in transition in the car and the baby was crowing as we arrived in L&D!

 

post #8 of 10

I plan to call the midwife (and my mother and my husband) as soon as I suspect labor maybe has started, then again when my water breaks and/or I can't smile.  My last labor was short and intense, so everyone is all over me to make sure they have a heads up.   I figure, even if it turns out not to be labor, I'd rather call her back and say, oops, false alarm, than be at transition and all alone in the house like last time.  That was not fun.  Well worth it considering, but not fun.

 

But then, with DD's hospital birth, that waiting turned out to be really really good, because she got the full course of labor including pushing, and didn't have any lung issues with the CS.  When we were considering another hospital birth, the plan was to hang out on the grounds until pushing stage to get the longest possible clock for VBAC (and the most labor possible if they called RCS).  

post #9 of 10

I haven't asked her yet. She just went out of the country after Friday's 34 week check up and won't be back till the Friday week 38 check. I'll see a lady she's working with for the weeks she's gone. I plan to ask her that question, just in case. I'll ask Linda when she gets back since there's no point before. She'll have just got back the day before my appt so ya.

 

I plan to at least text her when I think something's going on and take it from there.

post #10 of 10

The first time, my midwife told me to call when contractions were steadily 5 mins apart for an hour and/or if my water breaks. 

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