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Dingos are tricked into the treat of running in October! - Page 2

post #21 of 254

Wait. It's another month already? What happened to June?

post #22 of 254

Bec - Did Sparkle tell that we only use jars for glasses?  lol.gif  Sans stem however. 
 

post #23 of 254
Thread Starter 

You were working through all of June, Shanti!!!  luxlove.gif

post #24 of 254
Mel...I didn't think you meant me, I just wanted Plady to know I think it's all a process.

Dang my kids joy.gif swim team. Me thinks they need the aerobic workout more often.

Myself....back in the swing after a week of no exercise .
post #25 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plady View Post

Bec - Did Sparkle tell that we only use jars for glasses?  lol.gif   Sans stem however. 

 
You are using the wronngg person as a standard. I dont think I even noticed the glasses ... now the ulcerous mule, and the shanty lean-to off in the trees inhabited by an unreliable wanderer... lol.gif

I'm kidding of course, I luxlove.gif the whole thing. It will be a sad day when your house has "curb appeal", seriously
post #26 of 254

I need to get myself moving again. My job is finished, my house is as clean and organized as it is going to get for now and my feet are no longer killing me all the time. There will be lots of time to sit while I am doing course work. It feels so good to be able to sit again but I don't want to lose the fitness that came from running up and down those stairs all the time! I want to get myself into a routine of walking every morning but I can already tell it isn't going to be easy. It will have to wait until the kids have left for school every day. What is it going to take?

post #27 of 254

Subbing in. Even if I don't post often, I do read.  luxlove.gif to all the Dingos.
 

post #28 of 254

Hi Dingoes! 

 

Juvysen, what a super time--for a first half or any half! Great work.

 

JayGee, I'm with Mel38 on your patience. I do not have it. Probably a good thing I am not having to schlepp these kids off to school anymore.

 

Revolting, it sounds like you had quite a summer. I hope you're being gentle with yourself. There is always time to back up and start again. I didn't always believe it; I finally do. Hugs.

 

Nic, I suppose it's too early for mazel tov, but I am thinking of you, and wishing you happiness, and Chag Sameach!

 

bec, way to go to your dd! That pace is just a dream to me these days. Sigh.

 

Plady, come on. You've seen my farm. There is a way of living that I like to think of as "project-based." winky.gif Not everyone lives this way, and not everyone gets it, but Mel's definitely right. I'll pick a good neighbor over curb appeal.

 

And to everyone namaste.gif

 

RR: I am slowly climbing back onto the wagon. Kids and I have moved into dh's hotel suite, and there is a workout room, so I have been doing a little elliptical, a little TM, a little biking, and we have headed out to the trails a couple times to enjoy the glorious colors while we have the chance.

 

NRR: I know the transition into doing school at home is not expected to be smooth and worry-free. That is, I suppose, what is carrying me through these days. I vacillate between feeling so frustrated for ds, for all the things he should know by now that have eluded him, to feeling thankful I have the opportunity to get him caught up, to being disappointed I didn't start this sooner, so we'd have less to make up at this point. He's at a remedial level (IMO) in language arts and writing. He makes a good slog through math and is not quick, but catches every concept, at least. But parts of speech elude him, and getting him to communicate his thoughts more than superficially is like pulling teeth.

 

And then there's dd, blazing through her curriculum so fast that she needs near-constant attention just to keep fuel on the fire. She's on pace to finish the quarter two weeks early. That's good, because our upcoming travel will consume any head start she has going.

 

Speaking of travel, I am trying hard to embrace the unknowing. We will probably leave in 2 weeks or so, but there are all sorts of things coming into play--dh's work, our luggage, the next Islamic holiday, Morocco, UAE. Now it looks like dh may travel ahead and we'll meet in Morocco. But it's also possible that we might just ship extra luggage and all fly to Morocco. Details. I am trying just to focus on school and take every opportunity to enjoy autumn and see loved ones.

 

Totally OT: Dh got a Kindle. Now, this was not on my list, and originally he wanted to buy 2 (hotel points burning a hole in his pocket). I talked him down to one and staked a claim. What a great tool for a traveler. Finished The Leftovers and am now reading the new book by the Khan Academy guy. And we have an iPad, so I can sync books to it, and probably to the kids' iPods, too.

post #29 of 254

Jo -dizzy.gif
 

post #30 of 254
Jo - no kidding on the crazy spinning head! Good luck navigating it all. How do you like the Khan book? I heard an interview with him in NPR this morning and thought it sounded fascinating. I told my Dad I would buy it and share it with him when I finish. We use Khan Academy lessons with DS as enrichment in math (since there is no enrichment offered through school and he has a 103 average in math....)

RR. - did PT today, saw the chiro and will do my planks and pushups before bed. Tomorrow is my pain management consult and hopefully a steroid injection into the tib/fib joint. Youch.
post #31 of 254

My last post (Friday- last week) ended with something like "tomorrow I run". I wish to edit with "tomorrow my washing machine floods and creates havoc in laundry room, both bedrooms and hallway upstairs, plus living room/great room, pantry, hallway and bathroom downstairs. I am no longer a raving proponent of the upstairs laundry room. We're camped out at MIL's for our 5th night (though technically only my 3rd, since I worked night shifts the first two) and should be back in our house at some point tomorrow. 

 

In good news, my youngest seems to have mostly recovered from her asthma/allergy attack on Thursday night and I finally slept more than a couple of hours by the beginning of the week. It was pretty ugly at bedtime on Monday when I added up the total of 8 hours sleep since 5:45 Thursday morning. Tomorrow there is school, preschool and a run come hell or high water. Literally.

 

Re: curb appeal- I live in a new subdivision still under covenant with rules about aesthetics- compost bins must be hidden, no visible clotheslines, etc. I cringed signing it, because it seemed generic and not reflecting the village standards (it's cut and pasted from other developments, not locally made). The first year in our house I grew potatoes in the front "flower bed" and hoped the neighbours weren't too offended by my taste. My community is pretty eclectic, but my block is pretty mainstream- we try to keep some curb appeal (and resale value) but I find my energy is better focussed in the back yard where the sun shines, the laundry dries, the compost works, the kids play and the veggies grow. And though most of my neighbours aren't "my people", they are awesome at lending a wrench or helping to find a missing kid. My husband is working on a series of talks/local community history project right now and one of the events is going to be about the local homes- I have a lot of friends who would never consider living in the "new" part of town, new people in town who are renovating the old miner's homes, plus life-long villagers who live down the street from me. New vs old can be a strange us vs them division in our community- about values and history and a strange kind of snobbery on both sides. 

post #32 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1jooj View Post

NRR: I know the transition into doing school at home is not expected to be smooth and worry-free. That is, I suppose, what is carrying me through these days. I vacillate between feeling so frustrated for ds, for all the things he should know by now that have eluded him, to feeling thankful I have the opportunity to get him caught up, to being disappointed I didn't start this sooner, so we'd have less to make up at this point. He's at a remedial level (IMO) in language arts and writing. He makes a good slog through math and is not quick, but catches every concept, at least. But parts of speech elude him, and getting him to communicate his thoughts more than superficially is like pulling teeth.

 

And then there's dd, blazing through her curriculum so fast that she needs near-constant attention just to keep fuel on the fire. She's on pace to finish the quarter two weeks early. That's good, because our upcoming travel will consume any head start she has going.

 

Speaking of travel, I am trying hard to embrace the unknowing. We will probably leave in 2 weeks or so, but there are all sorts of things coming into play--dh's work, our luggage, the next Islamic holiday, Morocco, UAE. Now it looks like dh may travel ahead and we'll meet in Morocco. But it's also possible that we might just ship extra luggage and all fly to Morocco. Details. I am trying just to focus on school and take every opportunity to enjoy autumn and see loved ones.

 

Totally OT: Dh got a Kindle. Now, this was not on my list, and originally he wanted to buy 2 (hotel points burning a hole in his pocket). I talked him down to one and staked a claim. What a great tool for a traveler. Finished The Leftovers and am now reading the new book by the Khan Academy guy. And we have an iPad, so I can sync books to it, and probably to the kids' iPods, too.

 

It's amazing how different kids can be! Your travel plans sound fantastic. I don't know how you do this all.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MelW View Post

My last post (Friday- last week) ended with something like "tomorrow I run". I wish to edit with "tomorrow my washing machine floods and creates havoc in laundry room, both bedrooms and hallway upstairs, plus living room/great room, pantry, hallway and bathroom downstairs. I am no longer a raving proponent of the upstairs laundry room. We're camped out at MIL's for our 5th night (though technically only my 3rd, since I worked night shifts the first two) and should be back in our house at some point tomorrow. 

 

Oh no about the laundry room. I always said that I wanted to washer and dryer somewhere other than the basement, but with the layout of the house I just bought, I don't think it'll happen. Maybe it's a good thing.

 

RR: I finished the sixth week of couch 2 5K yesterday, though it was kind of a disaster. It had rained, and somehow I managed to fall twice, ripping a hole in my pants, skinning my knee and my elbow. I finished the run, but it was hard between the pain, seasonal allergies, and just not feeling any hope at getting decent at this whole running thing after falling. I probably won't get another chance to run until Saturday. I'm hoping to have healed and feel a little more positive by then.

post #33 of 254
MelW - yikes on the laundry disaster!!! I hope it all is back to normal soon. I shudder to think of the damage!

Re: houses, yards and curb appeal - our neighborhood covenant has a million stupid rules (many of which we have ignored...whistling.gif). For instance, no clothes lines (ours is retractable and in the backyard), no more than 2 pets (say hello to my three cats), no cars parked in the street overnight, trashcans out of sight, and mandatory front yard landscaping. My neighbor actually got a call when they didn't mow their grass for 2 weeks. Honestly, it is bit much. WRT physical appearance and other's opinions, I need to have that conversation with DD1. She hates having her hair brushed, tries to actively avoid tooth brushing, and often wears the same favorite outfit multiple days in a row. Plus, she doesn't wipe after peeing and frequently smells like it. She seems to have plenty of friends, but at age 8 she really should be caring more.

Wish me luck! I am off to my pain management appointment this afternoon.
post #34 of 254

I live in a neighborhood that is right behind a big university.  Many professors live here, and other white-collar types... but it's not a "rich" neighborhood where people have tons of money and just pay to have their lawns cared for, etc.  So, though the houses look like they *should* be nice (though fairly modest), with manicured lawns, half the houses look like they may have been abandoned.  Overgrown bushes and dirty looking houses are the norm.  lol.gif  It's funny because the neighborhood we moved from *LOOKED* exactly the same in terms of type of houses, but they were extremely well manicured (but was more of a community where there were a lot of retired blue-collar folks).  I laugh and joke that the new neighborhood (which we love - I enjoy that no one cares if our house isn't perfectly manicured) has "absent-minded professor syndrome".

 

I'm thrilled that there's no HOA, though ;)

post #35 of 254

Jo, not sure if you're asking for help on your DS or just venting, but in case you're asking for help, here's things we've learned in the last year:  *Multisensory learning works.  When at all possible, add movement, sound, touch to what he's to learn.  If it's parts of speech, make up a skit with the three of you -- verbs jump, adverbs wear an "ly," conjunctions have their arms reaching in both directions to connect thoughts, etc.  Spelling -- clap/jump syllables, hand signs for letter groupings (make up something for 'ing') or ASL letters for spelling -- air write words, color code words according to spelling rules, etc.

*Use graphic organizers for getting down thoughts beyond the most basic.  A list of juicy words over his desk.  Teach revision to include a step of adding details. DD uses one for main idea, with spines coming out for each detail, she then brainstorms adjectives/verbs/adverbs appropriate for the project, then she outlines paragraphs on a hamburger graphic organizer. 

*Teach typing -- revising is a lot less onerous when you don't have to rewrite every word.  The BBC program is good as it emphasizes positioning and accuracy over speed.

*Dictate into an ipod before writing (before or after the graphic organizer)

*Experiment with very prescriptive to very broad writing prompts.

*Memorize poetry

*Listen to books on tape.

 

Listening to books came as a recommendation from DD's neuropsych report.  It has really, really helped.  He was very clear -- no listening to garbage books, but listen to literature where the author uses rich language, rich sentence structure, and rich literary techniques.  We've been working our way through the library's collection of Newberry books and books by Newberry award winning authors.  We now listen for any car ride exceeding 20 minutes.

 

Mel UG on the washer

 

Curb appeal:  I let my 6 year old run the fertilizer spreader across the front lawn.  Good news:  the fancy organic stuff actually helps the grass significantly.  Bad news:  it makes it that much easier to see that DS missed about half the lawn, leaving it with light and dark green zebra stripes.  Worse:  the fertilizer is significantly more effective on dandilions than on the grass.  I'm sure perfect lawn guy across the street is ranting online daily about those crazy people across the street with this weird lawn full of weeds.

 

RR:  {insert whine here}  My foot hurts, my knee hurts, I'm TIRED,  our long run these days is 6 miles  and I'm signed up for a half marathon in 2.5 weeks {whine whine whine cheese}

post #36 of 254
Geo - those are wonderful and timely ideas. I am working on a unit of study for high schoolers as my semester project (it's actually more like a year's course of study) on linguistics; basically on the usage "wars", voice vs. rules, etc. One of the things I'm trying to put together is inductive grammar lessons based on language they already use (like "like" or "aint"), but it got me thinking about grammar as a mechanical structure, like a car or a body, and that got me thinking about how kids could act out grammar, how each person's body or body part could be related to someone else's, like Twister, or they have to build a structure (like a version of leggos, but with more prescription) that depends on certain things being in place so others dont fall, etc. dizzy.gif I am up to my eyeballs in this. Right now I'm doing an analysis of the word Aks, starting from Chaucer through Shakespeare.... aaaaaaaaahhhhh

Jaygee - good luck with the shot and PT!!!!

Jo - You are right that it is good you started this method and he will get there. It's hard to have 2 kids doing such different things. DD1 just qualified as gifted and scored high in the writing but I still have the same problems you described. It is like molasses in January getting that girl to come up with another idea (how the H did she do well on the test? lol.gif) One day at a time. Good luck with the transition. Try to do whatever you can to touch base with your center

Juvysen - Woot! That is an awesome time!

Melw - crap.gif That sounds like the worst! What great timing eyesroll.gif I hope you are hanging in there..

RR: Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

NRR: so stressed its just wrong. I am not good under pressure! I sure get sh** done, but I feel like h***. I wake in the middle of every night STRESSED, I eat badly, Im not exercising, just b/c the prospect of exercise with all this over my head is jut forbidding. I cant "make myself" as Dh keeps urging. Sigh. Its unsustainable. I keep telling myself; Dec. Dec. But that';s not healthy. Oh well, onward and onward... wild.gif
post #37 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkletruck View Post
but it got me thinking about grammar as a mechanical structure, like a car or a body, and that got me thinking about how kids could act out grammar, how each person's body or body part could be related to someone else's, like Twister, or they have to build a structure (like a version of leggos, but with more prescription) that depends on certain things being in place so others dont fall, etc. dizzy.gif
 

Jo - You are right that it is good you started this method and he will get there. It's hard to have 2 kids doing such different things. DD1 just qualified as gifted and scored high in the writing but I still have the same problems you described. It is like molasses in January getting that girl to come up with another idea (how the H did she do well on the test? lol.gif)

 

Grammar .... legos .... I'm remembering something.  When DS was in speech therapy, his last therapist (the one with low expectations that kicked him out of therapy) had these lego things, but she had two different "noun" blocks, one of which needed a little block before it, representing 'a' and 'the.'  Troll speech therapy catalogs, maybe?

 

On the gifted testing + putting it down on paper problems-- join the club.  ;)  The worst part is that since everyone knows she's so smart, they assume the writing struggles are just lazy.  They aren't lazy.  In our house, we've got documented proof.   It helps, but is no less frustrating.

post #38 of 254
And I'm so patient these days loveeyes.gif
post #39 of 254

I'm enjoying all of the curb appeal stories. Giggling at your child fertilized lawn Geo, and nodding at the absent-minded professor properties Juvysen. I'll keep an immaculate yard when I retire. Maybe. I did have a terrifically fun time watching the perplexed look on the face of the "Weedman" salesman when I said, "I don't value green grass". He was baffled, and asked to speak with my husband. (Who was inside, pants off, icing his leg from a mountain bike fall. When I told the weedman that, he made a quick retreat lol.gif)

 

RR- I ran. It wasn't terrific, but I'll take a slow 5k as a start. Boot camp tomorrow.

 

NRR- Off topic, but tangentially related to the Lego conversation- awesome Lego street art. My oldest daughter is lego-obsessed right now and we've been checking out some local buildings for decoration.

post #40 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelW View Post
NRR- Off topic, but tangentially related to the Lego conversation- awesome Lego street art. My oldest daughter is lego-obsessed right now and we've been checking out some local buildings for decoration.

How cool!!! Like yarn-bombing, but much less time consuming. I would love to participate in a yarn bombing, but at the rate I finish projects, it would have to be a slo-mo project over the course of weeks. Anyway, I'm sharing those lego street art pics! My kids will love that. So sorry about the washer disaster!! I hope that the repairs and clean up are mostly done by now. And that it never, ever, ever happens again.

 

I missed a running day this week because of busy-ness and a head cold. OK, I bailed. bag.gif And right as I was stressing about my training having a low mileage base. Oh well.

 

Sparkle, your life sounds over-full these days. I hope that you can carve out a moment or two to get some RR or some personal time in there. I know, "just do it" sometimes just doesn't cut it.

 

Sheesh, I have 30+ pages of editing work to get done before the kids get home from school, so what am I doing on MDC? winky.gif Have an excellent weekend, my Dingo friends!

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