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Dodge ball - Page 2

Poll Results: How do you feel about dodge ball?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 6% (5)
    love it!
  • 7% (6)
    like it.
  • 8% (7)
    whatever
  • 21% (17)
    dislike it.
  • 14% (11)
    hate it!
  • 8% (7)
    I think it is violent.
  • 12% (10)
    I think it promotes violence.
  • 20% (16)
    I think it's just a game.
78 Total Votes  
post #21 of 51

Like so many things, I think it depends on whether people are participating by choice, or being forced into it.  I hated dodgeball with a passion as a kid, probably because I was a popular target, but I think I could enjoy it now that I'm an adult and I'm in better shape and have a choice in the matter. 

post #22 of 51

I was good at the dodging, but did not like it. I didn't want to get hit, so when it got down to a few people left I would intentionally step out of bounds so that one of the girls who was throwing would notice and call me on it and then I had to go sit down. I voted "dislike".

post #23 of 51

It depends.  I can see how it would be used as a bullying device, but it was not experience.  I was bullied but it was more of a mean girl / psychological bullying than a physical bullying.  I was a physical kid myself and not many people picked on me physically.  

 

My siblings and cousins and next door neighbors always played dodge ball, and it was great fun.  For us, it was a game and a game that left us tired and spent at the end of long summer nights.  Again, I can see how kids would have negative experiences with it, which is why I think it depends on the intent and situation.

post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bokonon View Post

...I would rather see PE classes focusing on basic fitness and sports rules.  That's just my personal opinion.  I know that there are many schools that don't even have PE.  DS's old school couldn't afford a PE teacher, but his new one has PE once a week.

 

I agree. DS is incredibly lucky this year to have a phenomenal teacher who does PE with the kids every single day. joy.gif Since she does it so regularly, it's not all basic fitness -- she definitely incorporates a lot of (really cool, creative) games, and that's fine with me. But yeah, in a standard class where PE is only an occasional occurrence, I'd much rather have the kids doing fitness basics rather than standing around throwing a ball at each others. 

post #25 of 51

Dislike.

 

I was so bad at dodge ball, and in that sense I put it alongside Stratego and Hearts as games that I really suck at and therefore never ever want to play again.  But unlike the others, dodgeball did have favoritism and singling out.  I never noticed outright bullying in my personal experience, but everything I disliked about PE was distilled and purified and renamed DODGEBALL.

 

Didn't hate it, though, but like I said, my personal experience was not intensely bad.

post #26 of 51

So here's another question:  Why is dodge ball so popular if so many people dislike it?  I don't know how common of a game it is for kids today, but in our generation it seems quite common since we are all familiar with it.  Or does a poll like this skew results by attracting only people with negative memories of the game?

post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kythe View Post

So here's another question:  Why is dodge ball so popular if so many people dislike it?  I don't know how common of a game it is for kids today, but in our generation it seems quite common since we are all familiar with it.  Or does a poll like this skew results by attracting only people with negative memories of the game?

 

Because a lot of adults are bullies and have no problem with continuing the bully culture.

post #28 of 51

and becasue humans have some sort of sick urge to have others go thru the hard things they had to go thru.  probably the same reason you have heard "oh yuck this smells awful, here smell"

post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kythe View Post

So here's another question:  Why is dodge ball so popular if so many people dislike it?  I don't know how common of a game it is for kids today, but in our generation it seems quite common since we are all familiar with it.  Or does a poll like this skew results by attracting only people with negative memories of the game?

 

I think it's partly because it happens in PE. This is probably going to come out wrong, but I'll give it a try. IME, the people who go into teaching phys ed are usually jocks...not just athletes, but jocks, which is a slightly different group. These are, by and large, the people who never had any empathy for the clumsy kid, or the slow kid, or the kid who just didn't get it (or who had, whether diagnosed or not - austism spectrum disorders, sensory issues, etc.). They probably loved dodgeball. They may or may not have been deliberately harsh on the "lesser" kids (weaker, less coordinated, whatever), but fi they were, they almost certainly thought of it as "toughening them up" or "making them try harder and not wuss out" or some variation on the theme. They finish school, go become teachers, and come back to teach phys ed...and still want to "toughen up" the "weak" kids, and have never figured out that those kids went through hell in PE...so they just keep the cycle going. Dodgeball is part of it. (So is "you and you are team captains - pick your teams". This could only come from the brain of someone who was never picked last in their life...or a sadist.)

post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

 

I think it's partly because it happens in PE. This is probably going to come out wrong, but I'll give it a try. IME, the people who go into teaching phys ed are usually jocks...not just athletes, but jocks, which is a slightly different group. These are, by and large, the people who never had any empathy for the clumsy kid, or the slow kid, or the kid who just didn't get it (or who had, whether diagnosed or not - austism spectrum disorders, sensory issues, etc.). They probably loved dodgeball. They may or may not have been deliberately harsh on the "lesser" kids (weaker, less coordinated, whatever), but fi they were, they almost certainly thought of it as "toughening them up" or "making them try harder and not wuss out" or some variation on the theme. They finish school, go become teachers, and come back to teach phys ed...and still want to "toughen up" the "weak" kids, and have never figured out that those kids went through hell in PE...so they just keep the cycle going. Dodgeball is part of it. (So is "you and you are team captains - pick your teams". This could only come from the brain of someone who was never picked last in their life...or a sadist.)

 

I agree.

 

I don't think that's everyone that teaches PE, but it seems like a majority.

post #31 of 51

I commented briefly on dodgeball in another thread (in Education, I think) and it was suggested I add my comment here. Which I will, but will also flesh it out a bit.

 

Both of my kids' HSs sponsored dodgeball tournaments. Completely voluntary. At my son's school, there were no guidelines wrt team make-up. The tournament did have guidelines in terms of where the ball could be thrown (below the waist) and was supervised by teacher refs. Teams ranged from loads of jocks to misfits (like my son!). But a good time was had by all from what I could tell.

 

My daughter's school was more structured in terms of how the teams were made up: four students, one from each grade and evenly divided by gender and one teacher. Now, one might think that the involvement of teachers on each team would keep things calm and well-behaved. Well... I gather competition was quite fierce. Starting with the formation of teams. I can tell you that my daughter started cherry-picking her team from the first day of school each year after she was a freshman. As did several other students AND teachers. They took it pretty darned seriously. Probably more so than they did at my son's school. Team uniforms, good-natured trash-talking, etc. At the actual tournament, the only guideline was they couldn't shoot for the head. Other than that? No holds barred. Like I said - it could get pretty fierce. But again, a good time was had by all.

 

I remember dodgeball quite fondly from my own school days, to be honest. And no, I wasn't that good at it. LOL More like my son than my daughter.

post #32 of 51

I think dodgeball is popular in school because it's simple to understand and doesn't require a lot of equipment. All you need is a ball and a boundary and some kids. The rules are simple — you throw the ball and try to hit someone. If that person is hit then he or she is "out". Not much more than that. 

 

If you compare that to something like basketball which requires only slightly more equipment (a goal/basket + ball) the rules for basketball are much more complex. It's harder to teach, more skill is required to play it, and there's less flexibility on the size of the group that can play it.

 

However, mtiger's example, notwithstanding I think dodgeball doesn't have near the popularity outside of a school environment because most people don't really like it. I live right by a park (like the baseball field backs up to my back yard and I can see if from my deck). I see groups of kids and adults who organize themselves to play softball, baseball, kickball, soccer, basketball, and frisbee (sometimes catch, sometimes Ultimate), and non-ball games like Tag regularly. I NEVER see anyone organize a group to play dodgeball. 

post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
Dodge ball was something we were forced to play in grade school, while the teacher sometimes supervised and sometimes didn't. Yes, he would leave the gym, about half the time. It was something he had us 'play' nearly every gym class, except for the president's physical fitness obstacle course time, an annual event. Gym class was horrid, with the boys trying to hit the girls hard enough to leave marks.

There is a huge difference between being forced to participate and volunteering. And I wonder if that 'fierce' competition was fierce meaning the ball was thrown with intent to hurt, or fierce meaning that both sides did their best to win. It makes a difference.

In my experiences, dodge ball was the game of choice for a lazy teacher. I don't miss it, in the least.
post #34 of 51
I agree with others saying it was because it wasn't voluntary.  I think dodgeball could be a really fun game, but it is so easy to make it unfriendly.  And I suck at it, so it's just too frustrating to even think about.  orngtongue.gif
post #35 of 51
Major dislike. Bordering on hatred. I have some bad memories associated with dodgeball (though it was called German ball when I was in school - I suspect this is a very in-PC name nowadays).

I definitely think it was a way for bullies to torment kids under the auspices of it being a game. There was a boy in my class who wore a turban and despite the "no hitting above the waist" rule, some of the boys deliberately tried to knock his turban off (and succeeded once, as I recall). For me it was an exercise in humiliation because I had few friends and wasn't athletic at all. I would usually be the last kid standing because I had no friends trying to get me out and I always managed to make myself not noticeable (even though I was a chubby kid). Inevitably, someone would get me out by hitting me in the ass with the ball which added an extra level of humiliation.

I also wore glasses as a kid and I can't count how many times my glasses were smashed in PE. Basketball, dodgeball, volleyball, softball. All were magnets for my face, probably because I was so uncoordinated.

Now i work in an environment where we have the occasional sports day. Usually softball and volleyball once or twice a year. I try to make sure I'm on holidays because I hate team sports so much. I also have a seemingly athletic body so people tend to think I'm good at sports. The organizers always make it seem like it's just for fun but I always end up on a team with ultra-competitive type As. Last time we played volleyball it was a good thing I was wearing sunglasses because I was in tears for most of the day. Once my team realized I stunk they'd basically body slam me out of the way so I wouldn't touch the precious volleyball and possibly make our team lose. eyesroll.gif

I did much better in PE later in high school when we did more personal fitness activities. I was a great runner/jogger so I got decent marks because I didn't walk around the track like most of the girls in my class. At that point, a lot of girls took PE for "easy marks" because it was elective. But I liked my teacher and put in a lot of effort. I still stunk at anything involving hand-eye coordination(can't serve in badminton to save my life) but she saw the effort I was making! Which was a nice change from gym teachers just thinking I was pathetic and useless.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kythe View Post

So here's another question:  Why is dodge ball so popular if so many people dislike it?  I don't know how common of a game it is for kids today, but in our generation it seems quite common since we are all familiar with it.  Or does a poll like this skew results by attracting only people with negative memories of the game?

 

I think it was a low skill game, low equipment and kept a large number of children occupied so was an easy PE filler activity.  I don't think it was common because kids enjoyed it but rather because it was easy on teachers.

 

There were mass games that were kind of fun with those big cage balls but I don't know if those are as common as dodgeball.

post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

I think it's partly because it happens in PE. This is probably going to come out wrong, but I'll give it a try. IME, the people who go into teaching phys ed are usually jocks...not just athletes, but jocks, which is a slightly different group. These are, by and large, the people who never had any empathy for the clumsy kid, or the slow kid, or the kid who just didn't get it (or who had, whether diagnosed or not - austism spectrum disorders, sensory issues, etc.). They probably loved dodgeball. They may or may not have been deliberately harsh on the "lesser" kids (weaker, less coordinated, whatever), but fi they were, they almost certainly thought of it as "toughening them up" or "making them try harder and not wuss out" or some variation on the theme. They finish school, go become teachers, and come back to teach phys ed...and still want to "toughen up" the "weak" kids, and have never figured out that those kids went through hell in PE...so they just keep the cycle going. Dodgeball is part of it. (So is "you and you are team captains - pick your teams". This could only come from the brain of someone who was never picked last in their life...or a sadist.)

That makes sense. Maybe part of the reason that it's implemented better at DS's school is that PE is taught by the regular classroom teachers, not a dedicated PE teacher. (Although I have fond memories of my PE teacher in grade school - there are good ones out there!)
post #38 of 51

My biggest problem with dodgeball, is that we tell our children that it is not OK to hit others, or throw things at others.  (our school has a zero tolerance policy on physical violence).  So if it is not OK to hit them with a my hand, why is it OK to purposefully throw a ball at them?

 

I think it sends a confusing message to children.

post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post
And I wonder if that 'fierce' competition was fierce meaning the ball was thrown with intent to hurt, or fierce meaning that both sides did their best to win. It makes a difference.

 

Knowing my daughter? While the intent wasn't to hurt, if it happened? Oh well, it happens. While she is an aggressive athlete, she does not play dirty and would never intentionally hurt someone. But it does happen. It's happened to her; it's happened to her opponents. She plays a contact sport. It's all part of the game.

 

Now, granted, dodgeball isn't a "sport", per se. But, the ball can sometimes unintentionally hit someone where it shouldn't. I am not denying that dodgeball CAN be a vehicle for bullies. I think most competitive sports/activities can be. But they can also be healthy outlets. All depends on how it's handled.

 

When I was in elementary/middle school, I was not athletic. I suppose I could have been, but according to my Old World parents - young ladies did not participate in sports. Young ladies learned to sew, embroider, play the piano, etc. They did not get down and dirty on a ball field. So in the lower schools, I was one of the last picked because I wasn't that good. It wasn't until I got to HS and later that I got to be more physically active.

 

I don't think there are really any right or wrong answers on dodgeball.

post #40 of 51

dd loves dodgeball. its quite popular in her school. she loves it because its about the only 'sport' that has boys and girls play together. 

 

there is heavy supervision in school. however she is also in a class that has been together since second grade. there is a camaraderie amongst the students (which sometimes is a problem). no one even thinks of hurting anyone. i am sure accidents happen, but nothing bad enough to phase them. 

 

its pretty popular in dd's school. the kids always play with it when its the right time. 

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