or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › How strict is your state and do you like or dislike it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How strict is your state and do you like or dislike it? - Page 2

post #21 of 30

i honestly dont have any interest in the homeschool groups around here, way too much politics.

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post


I totally understand your feelings.  For some reason I find it irritating having someone look over my shoulder.  Brings out the contrarian and the anarchist in me.

Exactly. I have unschooled in several states, and in all but one, we managed to fly under the radar. I simply neglected to "register" my kids, and no one ever noticed. Said kids are over school age now, so I guess we succeeded! The only downside to not declaring my official intent to homeschool was to miss out on Barnes & Noble's home educator discount. Oh, well.

 

In the one exception, Georgia, we had to submit monthly attendance records (how exactly do you miss or not attend a day of unschool? biglaugh.gif) A nosy neighbor reported my "truant" children.  Anyway, I grudgingly sent in the form every month, but that was all there was to it.

post #23 of 30

It would be soooooo easy to "fly under the radar" where I live.  No one on my road to turn me in, elsewhere crawling with HSers so we wouldn't stand out.  So tempting!  But no, it's pretty easy to unschool by the books in WA, so I'm being a good girl and submitting my letter of intent on dd1's 8th birthday this winter.

post #24 of 30

It's not too difficult here.  Kids have to attend by their 6th birthday equivalent to 180 days of school per year.  There is supposed to be at least 4.5 hours a day of "school".  Parents are required to record attendance, and send it in each year and send in a progress report every year and save the report for 3 years.  They are also supposed to take a standardized test every 3 years after 3rd grade, but the results are kept by the parent.  

 

This is Georgia.  There is something that also says instruction is supposed to be at home and if kids are found outside of home during school hours parents could be fined no more than $100. The teacher only has to have a high school education or GED and you have to declare every year by September 1st: " This declaration must include the names and ages of students, the location of the home school, and the time the parents designate as their school year."

post #25 of 30

When we first started home schooling, we just never registered our children as they got to school age (age 6 in CA).  When they opted to go to public school, we enrolled them in the appropriate age grade.  Our son went to public school for K-5th.  We decided on a charter school/home school option for him for convenience.  He has the option of taking some classes at the campus and the rest of the subjects at home.  I can provide our own curriculum or have the school order for me within the CA guidelines (i.e. no religious textbooks or curriculum).  If we had decided on home schooling without being under the umbrella of a school, I can fill out a home school affidavit with the Dept. of Education every year.  I accumulate and keep records of what we study anyway so it's no hardship to copy them for the charter school.
 

post #26 of 30

New York

 

Very strict.  But it does vary by district and I'm in a great district (NYC).  Sending in minimal paperwork a few times a year isn't an issue at all for me.  I love my city and would never live anywhere else.  Homeschooling here is incredible, as you can imagine. The kids even get free bus/train passes to get around town.  

post #27 of 30

I am also in Oregon (the rules are described above, register as a HSer and test every 2 years), but we are choosing to forgo that. I have met many parents here who simply didn't register and simply don't test and have had no issues. I may be technically breaking the law, but I refuse to send my child in for standardized testing. 

post #28 of 30

I am also in Oregon (the rules are described above, register as a HSer and test every 2 years), but we are choosing to forgo that. I have met many parents here who simply didn't register and simply don't test and have had no issues. I may be technically breaking the law, but I refuse to send my child in for standardized testing. 

post #29 of 30

I'm in a no regulation state. We don't even have to declare we are homeschooling. Naturally, it's great for the most part. Every once and a while I think about the kids who fall through the cracks because of this and feel bad. Then I try to remember that happens even with kids in school anyway. I do feel those are so few cases that it's unfair to subject us all to government scrutiny because of it. I really enjoy the freedom to not have anyone's judging nose in my business.

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemygirl View Post

I'm in a no regulation state. We don't even have to declare we are homeschooling. Naturally, it's great for the most part. Every once and a while I think about the kids who fall through the cracks because of this and feel bad. Then I try to remember that happens even with kids in school anyway. I do feel those are so few cases that it's unfair to subject us all to government scrutiny because of it. I really enjoy the freedom to not have anyone's judging nose in my business.

What state are you in...?

 

 

I have homeschooled in two states within the last 2 years.  I just left NJ two years ago and only 2 months ago resigned from a state homeschool association where I was the point person for CPS inquiries, so I know the current laws there still pretty well despite living in IL.

 

I want to note:

 

THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHAT YOU FEEL IS "REQUIRED" AND WHAT IS REQUIRED BY LAW!!

 

It's one thing to have a law on the books that is never enforced.  It's quite another not to have a law on the books.  The maps that show how restrictive a state is are basing it on the actual laws... because at some point, someone can choose to enforce them.  But there are pros and cons to both situations:

 

If there's a law on the books, things are usually pretty well spelled out and you know what's expected.  As a result, if you meet those stated requirements, the hope is that nobody can say "boo" about it.  If CPS is called, you hand over the things that show you've met the requirements and you hope that's all there is to it.  They'll need to dig harder.

 

If there's no law, there's also no standard to meet.  So if someone doesn't like what you're doing and you have someone who's happy to make a case of you and your kids... look out.  And yes, it happens.  And no, HSLDA and HLA can NOT always help (even if they have taken on the case).  I know this first-hand.  There's a lot more potential for you to be tap-dancing to prove that you're educating your child and what is deemed acceptable is not a matter of the requirements of the law--now it's a matter of what a judge (and they vary WIDELY in opinions and ideas) thinks of your child's education.

 

 

In NJ, there is a vague statute that has recently been interpreted to mean that your kids need to be educated at least to roughly what their age-peers know.  But that is highly variable (the question always arises as to which school district you'd be compared to, which kid in the district--the smartest?  The lowest scoring? etc.).  There are no requirements for notification (although heavily advised if you pull them mid-year to avoid being mistaken for truant), no testing, no work samples, no attendance records.  You also are not guaranteed to get Special Ed services (although we have case law that would say you are entitled to them... also case law supporting unschooling).

 

In IL, there is a statute stating the number of days of instruction required and the subjects that need to be taught.  But again, no notification, no testing, no work samples and no attendance records to submit.  In IL, there is a tax break you might be able to use for homeschool-related costs, and many of the kids are able to partially enroll in the public schools.  I honestly don't remember if they're explicitly granted (by law) Special Ed services but I don't THINK they are.

 

In both states, you really have nobody to answer to unless someone calls CPS on you--at which point you need to somehow prove that you've met the requirements of the law (which are loose to begin with).  It's not like other states where there is an annual (or more frequent) interaction.

 

Hope this helps. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at Home and Beyond
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › How strict is your state and do you like or dislike it?