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Question about power outage.....help me understand. ***Updated post 63*** - Page 3

post #41 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngieB View Post

This is so interesting to me. First I can't believe that the east coast doesn't experience more power outages with all the crazy winter weather like blizzards and ice storms, I'm kind of jealous . I was also wondering for the moms who do live in the storm zone what did you do to prepare? There was a few day notice and lots of warning that there could and most likely would be long term power outages, so you had time to get ready. I understand that gas for generators wasn't an option for many but did you think about other ways to keep food cold or alternative heating methods? Once again I'm not trying to be mean I'm just very interested in how people deal with these emergency situations. Also has this change how you plan to prepare for future emergencies or do you feel like this was such a rare storm that you don't have to worry about more in the future?

 

How do you get ready in a few days without a car to transport all of the extra supplies?  How many trips on the subway does it take to stockpile enough water?  On a bus?  How about if you have to take the children with you?

 

What if you don't have the extra cash to buy all those extra supplies on short notice?

What if all the stores near you are sold out, you rely on public transportation and cannot get out to a more suburban store that still has stock?


What happens when you are on the 20th floor with 3 kids under 5 and your window is broken by flying debris allowing cold air and rain into your apartment?  How do you stay warm with electric heat and no fireplace?  How do you safely evacuate when the streets are flooded?

 

The lack of comprehension of simple logistics in your posts makes it all the more amazing that you seem to think you are well prepared for any "minor emergency" nature might send your way.

post #42 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildKingdom View Post

You can shovel snow, but you can't shovel water.

True, but you cant shovel snow for 10 miles to the nearest store. Well, the county could, but where we live we dont get big snows often enough for the state to have equipment to do that.  Our roads are some of the last to get plowed, and during the ice storm two years ago we were in our house for 13 days with no access to the store because we just couldnt get there due to snow and downed trees in the roads. But, we can cope and there's not that many of us. If there were millions of us, it would have been terrible. I cant imagine the devastation of watching everyone's houses and businesses being flooded and lives being taken. I think when tons of people's lives are taken, it can't be called a "minor emergency". 

 

**almost every life in KY that was taken during that ice storm was taken because of improper use of generators and propane stoves. They should never, ever be used indoors. 

post #43 of 135
Thread Starter 
I'm very sorry if my questions have offended anyone, I'm not making light of this emergency. I understand many are suffering, their homes a flooded and damaged or worse. That's not what I was talking about. I have heard a few storied from friends who have family back east who are safe and sound and homes are fine but have now power and seem to be completely unprepared and this seemed strange to me. After a few posters explained that there are not many power outages in these areas I understand that this is probably why they were unsure how to prepare.

I'm feeling really attacked for asking a simple question. Once again I'm sorry and I guess we should just end this thread since it is upsetting so many people, it was not my purpose at all.
post #44 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adaline'sMama View Post

True, but you cant shovel snow for 10 miles to the nearest store. Well, the county could, but where we live we dont get big snows often enough for the state to have equipment to do that.  Our roads are some of the last to get plowed, and during the ice storm two years ago we were in our house for 13 days with no access to the store because we just couldnt get there due to snow and downed trees in the roads. But, we can cope and there's not that many of us. If there were millions of us, it would have been terrible. I cant imagine the devastation of watching everyone's houses and businesses being flooded and lives being taken. I think when tons of people's lives are taken, it can't be called a "minor emergency". 

 

**almost every life in KY that was taken during that ice storm was taken because of improper use of generators and propane stoves. They should never, ever be used indoors. 

 

So very important to remember especially as the winter storm months are coming!

 

We have grills we can use as well as a propane camp stove.  But we also have outdoor space where we can use them safely. 

Apartment dwellers often do not have that option.

post #45 of 135

I've lived in Brooklyn since 1996, and in that time, I've lost power once, in 2003. When the power was also out hundreds or thousands of miles in every direction. I have in that time expected to possibly lose power and stocked up on shelf stable foods and filled up containers of extra water...twice, this week and last year. It's not really that fragile a system. I know plenty of people without power now, and they are all, as a previous poster said, eating non-perishable food, drinking water they laid by before the storm, wearing extra sweaters, wishing they could have a shower, and most of all, being thankful even as the stir crazy sets in, because they or their children were not crushed by falling trees or carried off and drowned in a flood. A lot of people weren't that lucky, in this "minor emergency." The people on tv bitching about not being able to watch tv are the lighter side of the situation.

 

I've lived in the NYC suburbs (where the power does go out more often), although mostly as a child, and never as a parent. I have never lived in a truly rural environment, and knowing that about myself, I cannot imagine any situtation where I would respond to a crisis in a rural area by asking why they weren't smart enough to do whatever I would do in my vastly different situation. Just like I would not tell someone who was completely isolated and unable to work, get food, etc., because they didn't have a car that they should be taking the subway.

post #46 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngieB View Post

I'm very sorry if my questions have offended anyone, I'm not making light of this emergency. I understand many are suffering, their homes a flooded and damaged or worse. That's not what I was talking about. I have heard a few storied from friends who have family back east who are safe and sound and homes are fine but have now power and seem to be completely unprepared and this seemed strange to me. After a few posters explained that there are not many power outages in these areas I understand that this is probably why they were unsure how to prepare.
I'm feeling really attacked for asking a simple question. Once again I'm sorry and I guess we should just end this thread since it is upsetting so many people, it was not my purpose at all.

I think it is an interesting question - how people around different parts of the country prepare for emergencies.  Perhaps the timing is a tad off, however?

 

Have a good evening, 

 

Kathy

post #47 of 135

Oh, and in terms of outdoor space and camping stoves and such? My family and I stayed inside for several days. We don't have private outdoor space, but even if we did, we didn't want to get killed by the huge trees breaking and falling all over our neighborhood. The city still isn't letting people in the parks.

post #48 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngieB View Post

I'm very sorry if my questions have offended anyone, I'm not making light of this emergency. I understand many are suffering, their homes a flooded and damaged or worse. That's not what I was talking about. I have heard a few storied from friends who have family back east who are safe and sound and homes are fine but have now power and seem to be completely unprepared and this seemed strange to me. After a few posters explained that there are not many power outages in these areas I understand that this is probably why they were unsure how to prepare.
I'm feeling really attacked for asking a simple question. Once again I'm sorry and I guess we should just end this thread since it is upsetting so many people, it was not my purpose at all.

 

I think you're still missing the point.

 

It's not that people were "unsure" how to prepare.

 

It's that a natural disaster of this magnitude has never fallen on this area in recorded history.  This was the largest hurricane in recorded history.  It was building wind speed and slowing down all day, and then it suddenly sped up and hit at almost category-2 level.  There have been 4 Category 2 hurricanes to hit New York in recorded history, and none had as extreme a tidal surge.  

 

People were unprepared, because there is no way to "prepare" for something that unexpectedly destroys the entire infrastructure of your daily life.

 

You prepare for your snowstorms, because you know what to expect.  Imagine preparing for them with your car suddenly gone, your road out swept away, and your power outage lasting for months.  And I am not just talking about Manhattan right now: this is exactly the situation in the suburbs right now.  Electricity is still spotty.  Water is contaminated.  It is difficult to buy food and nearly impossible to buy gas.  Roads are still impassible.  I repeat, that's the situation in the suburbs.

 

Should these people have been mind readers?

post #49 of 135
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

I think it is an interesting question - how people around different parts of the country prepare for emergencies.  Perhaps the timing is a tad off, however?

Have a good evening, 

Kathy

greensad.gif yeah I guess so. I really didn't mean to upset anyone.

I'm the first to admit I have no real understanding of urban living and I now see my question was pretty stupid but the same could be said for someone who has never lived in a rural area, there are things that seem so obvious to me but I'm sure would really surprise or bother others.
post #50 of 135

I think you've got a couple of different questions here that got conflated with the super storm disaster.

 

#1: Does the "East Coast" lose power less often than the west?

 

answer: It depends. There's a whole lot of "east" and some areas do lose power more than some areas of the west, but I'm betting the power goes off more in your rural environment than it does in San Francisco, too. In rural areas of the Northeast I imagine folks were able to make most of the same preparations that you would. In an urban, or even suburban environment it's different and there are more limitations on how you can prepare.

 

 

#2: How do MDC moms prepare for power outages?

 

answer: Here in NC where I am, we run to the grocery store and clear out all the milk and bread as fast as we can in case we get stuck at home and can't make it back out. I, personally, don't do this because I don't drink a lot of milk or eat a lot of bread, but many people do. You should see the store shelves after they predict a flake of snow. We do have power outages from time to time, but ours is rarely out for days at a time. Usually it's back up in a matter of hours if not minutes. We have had big power outages, though. We had a bad ice storm in Dec 2001 and a bad hurricane in '96 and the power was out for about a week both times. The hurricane did more damage, but it was Sept and not cold so a more convenient time for a power outage. We were unable to get out of our street for a week due to downed trees across the road. 

post #51 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngieB View Post


greensad.gif yeah I guess so. I really didn't mean to upset anyone.
I'm the first to admit I have no real understanding of urban living and I now see my question was pretty stupid but the same could be said for someone who has never lived in a rural area, there are things that seem so obvious to me but I'm sure would really surprise or bother others.

Again, you're missing the point.

 

It's not about city versus urban, and constantly claiming that you just don't understand the city folk, and the city folk probably don't understand you! is belittling and entirely besides the point.

 

It's about an unprecedented disaster.

 

I'm sure your friends were prepared for what they considered to be the worst case scenario.  And then it turned out to be much, much worse.

 

Why is that so hard to understand?

post #52 of 135
I think a lot of folks did take it seriously, and did prepare. Not everyone, though. Some did not evacuate when they were told to evacuate. That always seems to happen in any emergency. Even in CA, some stay when there's fire moving their way. It happens.

This one is not completely over in some ways. The storm itself has moved on, but the aftermath is still bad in areas. Fortunately for me, my area is pretty much back to normal, with only a few signs of what happened earlier this week. For that, I'm grateful!

I agree that a 'how to prepare for an emergency' thread may be helpful -- after the emotions are not so high.
post #53 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post

I think you've got a couple of different questions here that got conflated with the super storm disaster.

 

#1: Does the "East Coast" lose power less often than the west?

 

answer: It depends. There's a whole lot of "east" and some areas do lose power more than some areas of the west, but I'm betting the power goes off more in your rural environment than it does in San Francisco, too. In rural areas of the Northeast I imagine folks were able to make most of the same preparations that you would. In an urban, or even suburban environment it's different and there are more limitations on how you can prepare.

 

 

#2: How do MDC moms prepare for power outages?

 

answer: Here in NC where I am, we run to the grocery store and clear out all the milk and bread as fast as we can in case we get stuck at home and can't make it back out. I, personally, don't do this because I don't drink a lot of milk or eat a lot of bread, but many people do. You should see the store shelves after they predict a flake of snow. We do have power outages from time to time, but ours is rarely out for days at a time. Usually it's back up in a matter of hours if not minutes. We have had big power outages, though. We had a bad ice storm in Dec 2001 and a bad hurricane in '96 and the power was out for about a week both times. The hurricane did more damage, but it was Sept and not cold so a more convenient time for a power outage. We were unable to get out of our street for a week due to downed trees across the road. 

 

Off topic, but before we got married, I went to visit DH in SC (I'm from IN). I visited late December-early January. While I was there, they called for 1.5" of snow. While I realized that that is an abnormal amount, it was still peculiar to hear the news reports, "There's going to be an inch and a half of snow. Everyone stay inside unless it's an emergency!!!"

post #54 of 135

I just love that a country bumpkin (not said with malice as I am one myself) cannot grasp major city living vs. unprecedented natural disaster.  Several of your "solutions" are downright deadly.  If you are as self sufficient as you claim to be,YOU should know more about the safety of the things you preach. 

 

I'm taken aback by the smug arrogance displayed here.  Actually, I'm not sure which bothers me more, the smug arrogance or the downright lack of comprehension of this so called "minor" emergency. 

post #55 of 135

I don't even know how to respond to this thread.  I live in Brooklyn.  MANY of us MDC moms live in the areas hit hardest by the hurricane.  I'm floored that in response to this huge tragedy, you took action by posting on a message board about how you just don't understand why people let this happen to them.  I just can't fathom that lack of compassion.  Go look at cnn.com.  Have you seen the photos?  Have you read about the mom in Staten Island who clung to a tree for hours in the floodwaters while holding on to her two toddler boys, before they were ripped out of her arms and drowned?  And today, you're musing about the mistakes New Yorkers made by not being as prepared as you think you would have been?  

 

I went to the grocery store in my neighborhood tonight and met a mom with a 3 week old baby and three older kids.  She lives in the Rockaways, one of the neighborhoods that was flooded.  She's staying with her inlaws in my neighborhood for the foreseeable future, since they have no home to return to.  They lost their home and everything they own.  Her baby was totally cute, and her 9 year old sang me a song about their neighborhood.  Do you get that these are real people?  Real people, mothers with kids, who are affected by this hurricane?

 

I don't even know what to say to this thread.  I prepared for the storm in some ways, but we were also just really lucky to be in a neighborhood that didn't lose power and wasn't flooded.  You may think that New Yorkers failed during this storm, but I want to tell you that that is not the case.  We did our best.  My neighborhood facebook group was busier today than it ever has been, with everyone coming together to figure out who needed what, and how to get it to them.  It was really uplifting.  I love our city.

post #56 of 135
A79E4D1A-CE64-468C-96BB-B9687AAEC56D-4411-000003A51F454D23.jpg

Seaside Heights, NJ.

About 15 miles from where I grew up.

Look like a minor emergency to anyone here?
post #57 of 135

I live in NY, a little north of the city.  In an apartment, so can't do the generator thing and don't have a fireplace, etc.  Got a lot of non-perishable foods and water, batteries, etc (this stuff ran out very quickly at the stores); charged up the cell phone and found out in advance where they were setting up "comfort stations" with heat and electricity, if it came to that.  We were, however, extremely fortunate to be in a narrow swath of "calmer" area, storm-wise.  The wind blew like crazy but we never lost power, at least here in town (some on the outskirts have, and although they have fireplaces and whatnot are still anxious for the power to return... hot showers are a nice thing!).  We've had lesser storms where we've been out of power a couple of days, so I'm still amazed we were so lucky through this.  Very grateful. 

 

I grew up in New England, and also lived in NYC for several years, and can't remember being out of power for very long - a few hours maybe.  So it was never a huge concern to have to be able to live off the grid, so to speak, on our own resources.  I personally have only noticed it as an issue since living in this particular area.  Various personal circumstances mean that moving is not an easy choice at the moment, and it's a really high cost of living area so getting a new place with its own heating options is not on the table right now, as much as I'd like it.  Everyone I know just prepares the best they know how; the ones who still have power offer the use of showers, etc, to the ones who don't have it. 

 

But as lucky as we were personally there was no way to get around the sheer magnitude of Sandy.  Who's prepared for entire neighborhoods being washed away?  And in NYC, transportation completely shut down.  No subways, no buses, no commuter rails; most bridges closed for a time.  That kind of thing just does not happen!  Unprecedented.  And I know very few people who have cars in NYC; I never did (it's not like you have driveways to park them in, so an enormous, expensive pain in the butt to find parking).  So some areas were supposed to evacuate - but how?  There are many unusual actors of this storm that made life grind to a halt for a while.  But people have absolutely bent over backwards to help others and rescue people; there is much compassion and concern and bravery and work going on in the affected areas.  And I applaud every single effort.

post #58 of 135

where I live, our power goes out either during a tornado/horrible severe thunderstorm, or an ice storm. when an ice storm is forecasted, the stores all suddenly run out of milk and bread. people make sure they have kerosene for heaters, and water. I fill up jugs of water and put them in my stand-alone freezer(later on, if the power is out, I put the stuff in the fridge outside...after all, it *is* an ice storm, so it's cold enough). we have a single family home, though, and live in the suburbs. we have enough family spread around that there are likely to be many within driving distance who did not lose power. we borrow freezer space if we need to, and take warm showers elsewhere. in...I think 2004, or 2005, we had a bad ice storm and the power was out for a week in some spots. we lived in the country, in a cow pasture(yep), and our power was out almost 3 days. we had a kerosene heater, food outside in the yard keeping cold(lol) and my MIL was 7 minutes away(the roads were clear!) and had power and warm showers.

 

i can't imagine living in a tiny apartment, with kids, no car, no way to store extra food, or gas of any kind, no way to keep your foods outside without being stolen, no way to get anywhere bc of the flooding, downed trees and difficulty clearing them. this is a major disaster!

post #59 of 135

That is because as soon as a flake hits the ground, people start suddenly wrecking into everything. The snow here is...different...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmcneal View Post

 

Off topic, but before we got married, I went to visit DH in SC (I'm from IN). I visited late December-early January. While I was there, they called for 1.5" of snow. While I realized that that is an abnormal amount, it was still peculiar to hear the news reports, "There's going to be an inch and a half of snow. Everyone stay inside unless it's an emergency!!!"

post #60 of 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplerose View Post

That is because as soon as a flake hits the ground, people start suddenly wrecking into everything. The snow here is...different...

I know. I was just saying that it's one thing to understand that the situation is different, it's another to experience it. *shrug* I didn't mean anything by it.

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