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Rotavirus - Page 3

post #41 of 77
I'd skip it. When was that one added to the schedule? My older kids were fully vaxxed and never recieved rotavirus vaccine. No especially memorable stomach illnesses here, though they've all had bouts of this and that. I think there are more important illnesses to worry about, all things considered.
post #42 of 77
Jenny were your older kids ebf?
post #43 of 77

Fwiw, all 3 of my kids were exclusively breastfed, none were vaxxed for rota, and I cannot remember any nasty cases of diarrhea.

 

Apparently 4/5 of the population gets rota…but honestly, it did not even make the radar in our household. 

post #44 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

Jenny were your older kids ebf?
EBF until 4 months, then, on the crummy advice of our ped I started them on rice cereal mixed with formula. Would do that differently if I could go back. But neither ever took a bottle and both weaned between 1-2 yrs. For what it's worth.
post #45 of 77

Two out of three of my children had a tummy bug which was likely rota. DD #1 was around 9 months, bf but did get a few solids at that point. I did take her to the ER because she went through a night without wetting her diaper and it was Sunday. I got horrible advice from the resident (to give her congee - rice water porridge and stop breast feeding), by the time I took her to the peds on Monday, she was on the road to recovery. DD#2 had it around 18 months, she was almost ebf, it lasted longer but she never got dehydrated. DS was also just about ebf until he was well over 2 (not a fan of food), never had it.

 

I wouldn't vax for it - but I don't vax for anything. It wasn't pleasant, but it wasn't that bad.

post #46 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

Fwiw, all 3 of my kids were exclusively breastfed, none were vaxxed for rota, and I cannot remember any nasty cases of diarrhea.

 

Apparently 4/5 of the population gets rota…but honestly, it did not even make the radar in our household. 

 

Neither of our kids were vaxed for rota and neither got it. Both were extended BFers (until age 3), but not exclusively, some formula supps on occasion when they were infants.

 

I had one person argue that my kids must have had it and I didn't realize it, but hearing firsthand experiences of how unpleasant the illness it, I'm pretty sure it would be unmistakable. 

post #47 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

Saying "I did _____and I was fine" is no more accurate for vaccines than it is for breastfeeding or carseats, is my point. It's the ultimate selection bias.

Then please stop saying it about vaccines ("the vast majority who get vaccines are just fine") because that's the ultimate selection bias.


Edited by Taximom5 - 12/31/12 at 7:07pm
post #48 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by prosciencemum View Post



This vaccine just about to be made available in the uk which is great news in my opinion.

Why is this great news?  Are infants in the UK likely to be infected by tainted feces, which is how rotavirus is spread?  

Since the rotavirus is a live vaccine, it seems like adding it to the vaccination schedule for infants in a developed country (who would otherwise not be at risk for it)  is a good way to SPREAD the virus.

post #49 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post

edit to remove quote

 

This is a support-only forum.


Edited by chickabiddy - 12/31/12 at 3:21pm
post #50 of 77

Hi All, As the forum guidelines state:

"This is a support-only forum for those who are vaccinating selectively, on a delayed schedule or fully vaccinating on schedule. Members who aren't vaccinating should not post here to debate or argue accuracy or opinion of things posted. "

 

Taximom5, please edit your posts above as they are outside the forum guidelines. Chickabiddy, please remove the quote of Taximom5's post from your post.

 

Thank you,
HHM

post #51 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyHappyMommy View Post

Hi All, As the forum guidelines state:
"This is a support-only forum for those who are vaccinating selectively, on a delayed schedule or fully vaccinating on schedule. Members who aren't vaccinating should not post here to debate or argue accuracy or opinion of things posted.
"

Taximom5, please edit your posts above as they are outside the forum guidelines. Chickabiddy, please remove the quote of Taximom5's post from your post.

Thank you,

HHM

Doesn't this mean that members who DO vaccinated children CAN post and debate? I received all required vaccines as a child. My children have received a combined total of 76 vaccines doses.

I'm not trying to be argumentative with you, HHM. I'm just trying to clarify. Is there a minimum number of vaccines one's children must receive in order to post in this forum?
post #52 of 77
It has nothing to do with vaccine status. It means you're not supposed to make a big stink and disagree or debate.
post #53 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taximom5 View Post

Doesn't this mean that members who DO vaccinated children CAN post and debate? I received all required vaccines as a child. My children have received a combined total of 76 vaccines doses.

I'm not trying to be argumentative with you, HHM. I'm just trying to clarify. Is there a minimum number of vaccines one's children must receive in order to post in this forum?

 

I think this is a good question. This should be a place to support those vaccinating selectively, on a delayed schedule, or fully vaccinating on schedule (or those considering vaccinating); personally, I don't think it is realistic or within the spirit of the guidelines to set a "minimum" number of vaccines; after all many parents considering vaccinating (but not yet vaccinating) might look here for support. And vaccinating selectively, on a delayed schedule, or fully vaccinating on schedule represents a wide range of choices, so there may be different viewpoints expressed here. That said, the purpose of the forum is support and is not debate, so please keep this in mind when posting. If there's a topic you'd like to debate, please discuss that topic in the Vaccine Debate forum.

post #54 of 77

Yes, rotovirus is an interesting one (if I'm remembering correctly). It's one that even the instructions from the manufacturer only recommends for young children. I'll see if I can find that info for you. One thing I did when considering which vaccines to get is to just go through a simple chart and look at the consequences of the illness. If they are consequences you can live with as a parent, that's something to consider.  I'll be back with more info...

post #55 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

Yes, rotovirus is an interesting one (if I'm remembering correctly). It's one that even the instructions from the manufacturer only recommends for young children. I'll see if I can find that info for you. One thing I did when considering which vaccines to get is to just go through a simple chart and look at the consequences of the illness. If they are consequences you can live with as a parent, that's something to consider.  I'll be back with more info...


This is correct. Wich is why doctors don't even give it anymore after a certain age, somewhere around twelve to eighteen months, I think.
post #56 of 77

Here is a copy of an insert. Not sure if this info is still current. Verify if this is a main source for your decision: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM142288.pdf

post #57 of 77

This is a while back, but I remember reading about the rotavirus vax shedding for some time, and I gave pause because dd was in a daycare setting and I wondered what effect that might have on the other kids. Is that something? (or was I completely misinformed)

post #58 of 77
It does shed, through feces. Basic hygiene is the only necessary precaution.
post #59 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

It does shed, through feces. Basic hygiene is the only necessary precaution.

If the only way the virus is spread is through contaminated feces, and if the vaccine produces contaminated feces, and if basic hygiene is the only necessary precaution, why is the vaccine being considered for developed countries, where  advanced sanitation systems are the norm and basic hygiene is the norm?  Why would a select/delayed vax parent from a highly developed country even need to consider it?

 

Please note, I am not debating.  I am asking questions.  smile.gif

post #60 of 77
The viral load in feces from the actual virus is several hundred times the viral load that is sometimes (not always) present due to shedding. That makes it much more contagious. As evidenced by the fact that before the vaccine was introduced pretty much all children got roto at one point or another and there are few to no cases of circus transmission due to shedding. The virus that is shedded is also attenuated, so better to have that around than the full strength virus.

As for why a parent in a developed country would get it, I can only speak for myself but I figure why go through a painful messy illness if I can avoid it with a safe vaccine? Other parents will have to speak for themselves, I imagine there are lots of different reasons.
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