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If you are a seasoned unshooler with children 9 and older - Page 3

post #41 of 45
I'm in PA, and my son is now 17. Neither of cares what this year's evaluation will be like, because it's the last one, legally. In fact, we're debating the graduation issue. He sees no reason to worry about a diploma.

I've always been frustrated because he excelled at math early, then lost interest. I believe he could do more, but he wants to be a writer, and has written a couple of books this year. I was just curious. I wish I could get him interested in math again, just in case he wants to pursue something else, someday. Oh, well.
post #42 of 45
Duplicate post.
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

I'm in PA, and my son is now 17. Neither of cares what this year's evaluation will be like, because it's the last one, legally. In fact, we're debating the graduation issue. He sees no reason to worry about a diploma.

I've always been frustrated because he excelled at math early, then lost interest. I believe he could do more, but he wants to be a writer, and has written a couple of books this year. I was just curious. I wish I could get him interested in math again, just in case he wants to pursue something else, someday. Oh, well.

If he decides he wants to get a degree in English or literature or something a bit later on, he can just take a remedial college course in math,, one semester and he'll be ready.  Or he can pick up a math curriculum and do it himself in a short period of time.  It's pretty amazing that he has written some books already!  He's obviously not afraid of working to finish a goal, so if/when he requires that math component, he will get it.  

post #44 of 45
He keeps telling me he can get whatever math he needs if and when he needs it, and otherwise doesn't want to bother with it. I worry he will be viewed as having difficulty learning math, if he has to take a remedial math course later.

I know, that's me worrying about what others will think about him, and me, instead of being confident in his abilities. I struggle with that.
post #45 of 45

My daughter is 9, we've been unschooling most of her life.

 

I have, as someone above me said, "mini freakouts" about her socially, mostly at her lack of "street smarts" in the social sense. Among unschooled or eclectically homeschooled kids, she's fine.

 

It's among traditionally schooled, especially public schooled kids, that she tends to get in trouble. Public schools here are rough socially, very hierarchical and almost a "Lord of the Flies" environment. DD has few skills to cope with that mentality. She trusts and likes adults, she's a very poor liar (it's comical the few times she's tried, usually at the behest of older children), and she doesn't have the reference points to understand why these children lie, steal, bully, manipulate.

 

As she grows older, it's happening less and less, but when she was younger, she would often get roped in and become (mostly) unwittingly complicit in their wrongdoings, because it just never occurred to her that they were lying or intentionally being bad. Nowadays she's grown wiser and has the developmental maturity to understand that most children come from environments, school and home, where lying, manipulating, power struggles, bullying and deception, are not only commonplace but necessary. She's not indiscriminate with her trust any more and takes the time to think about why she's being asked to go along with things, what others' motivations may be.

 

 

I like others here have had occasional outbursts of wanting to enforce schoolwork to make sure she's "on track." As much as I hate it, I don't think my inner school-marm is ever going to completely shut her ugly face! I've resisted temptation to assign work, but I do keep curriculum in the house. Singapore, those big colourful all-in-one workbooks, Spectrum, little things like that. I consider them just another resource. And she actually likes some of them, she does it when she's bored or takes a workbook when we have a long car trip ahead. That it's an option for her is enough to satisfy me and shut up my inner school marm! The rest of me just has to have faith that if she wants or needs to learn soemthing, she will find a way, whether it's through those workbooks or not. And so far that's exactly what's happened, she always finds her own way and a way she is happiest with.

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