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Why Do People Follow Medical Authorities? - Page 7  

post #121 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post


Sample size seemed relevant to decision-making.  Sorry.

Yes, I suppose it is -- this shouldn't become a debate specifically about sample size but where relevant to trust it's ok.  

post #122 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

Yes, I suppose it is -- this shouldn't become a debate specifically about sample size but where relevant to trust it's ok.  

I don't understand.  Why is this an unreasonable, off topic issue?  The topic of the thread is why people follow medical authorities.  I think it's very relevant to clarify if people are making decisions based on one bad or good experience versus some kind of systemic issue.

post #123 of 198

Sample size relevant to the issue of trust is relevant so long as it is discussed in the spirit of trying to understand another's point of view. Derailing the thread to the point where we are only debating sample size is OT. Feel free to PM me for more information. 

post #124 of 198

See post #108 for a good example of how to discuss sample size while maintaining the topic and discussion and understanding. 

post #125 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post

"Bashing" is saying things like "I know one (or two) doctors who give bad advice about breastfeeding; therefore, I conclude and state as fact that doctors don't know anything about breastfeeding". 

 

I tend to conclude that they generally give bad advice on certain subjects based on not only my experiences but the experiences of people I know (many who belong to a local AP/natural parenting group). 

 

I don't think they necessarily need to do extra studying in breastfeeding or co-sleeping to be good in their field; however it would be nice if they didn't give bad advice as "experts" to parents who don't know any better. 

post #126 of 198
I take doctors, likes people, on a case by case basis. I've known good ones and bad ones. I probably tend to give them the benefit of the doubt, though, because I've known,ore good than bad. I was just talking to my mom today about a medical resident who saved my right leg. While I generally think orthopedic surgeons are kind of arrogant, I'll always be grateful for that one and his expertise.
post #127 of 198

Well they tend to excel at fixing things like broken legs and poisonings. Acute problems. 

post #128 of 198
In my experience that totally depends on the doctor. I agree there are areas where western medicine excels more than others, though.
post #129 of 198
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post


My other problem is with doctors believing themselves to be parenting or feeding (nutrition) experts with minimal or no training. If they were honest about their limitations, and refer me to better trained individuals, I'd have more respect. I had no less than three separate doctors tell me I needed to put my baby on IsomilDF (spelling may be wrong) for a diarrhea caused by a virus. I kept repeating that I was breastfeeding, and they repeated themselves AS IF I HADN'T SPOKEN. It wouldn't have bothered me so much if they had at least acknowledged my words, but they didn't give any indication that I would be able to return to breastfeeding. In the end, I got my advice from a breastfeeding counselor (lactation consultat in training) who assured me that continuing to breastfeed was best. She was right. Twenty four hours later he was fine. Was it a risk? Yes. But if I hadn't taken that risk he might have been switched to formula at 14 weeks.

 

I have had a similar experience. At 9 months my eldest (breast fed) DD had a gastrointestinal virus and went the whole night without wetting her diaper. I was worried about dehydration so took her to the ER at a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. The resident told me to stop nursing her and give her congee (rice porridge). I knew better so ignored his advice, continued nursing her and she got better in a couple of days.

post #130 of 198

One of my nephews had jaundice, and my sister's doctor told her not to nurse him and to give formula instead. Thank goodness she ignored her and kept on breastfeeding.

 

Currently she's in the south and says that a lactation consultant neighbor of hers can't wait to move out of the area because it's virtually impossible to get medical personnel on board with encouraging nursing. 

post #131 of 198
Nevermind - not even worth it.

Edited by Bokonon - 11/29/12 at 8:11pm
post #132 of 198
I live in the south and I find stereotypes about how we're all ignorant rednecks really offensive.
post #133 of 198

 Between the constant doctor bashing and making huge stereotypes about people who live in my part of the country, it's just so offensive that I cant take this seriously. 

 

Seriously, all Im hearing about is how all the doctors that you all know have all given bad advice and been terrible to you. What about all the doctors who save lives, heal people, help people, and spend a huge part of their lives learning how to do it? Most doctors dont get into the business of being a doctor so that they can patronize you and tell you how stupid you are. 

 

And as far as mountian dew goes, people all over the country make terrible parenting decisions. Let's not start picking on the south. There are people in rural Illinois that I know have done the same thing. "There are areas" all over the country that make bad decisions. And fwiw, there are at least two huge medical teaching hospitals that I know of in the south that are currently working to promote breastfeeding in hospitals and at health departments. 

post #134 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

I live in the south and I find stereotypes about how we're all ignorant rednecks really offensive.

 

I've lived in the south.  It is not a stereotype that there are areas in the south that have health problems around consumption of Mountain Dew. 

 

I apologize if what was stated was offensive to anyone, but you're reading way too much into it.  No offense was intended.

post #135 of 198
Stereotyping people by geography is offensive no matter how specifically vague you're being. People all over the country do stupid stuff. It is about those people and individual decisions they made, not where they live, so why brim that into it? If I made a similar comment involving race ("there are SOME purple people who . . .") it would be undeniably offensive. This is no different. Stop stereotyping people.
post #136 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

Stereotyping people by geography is offensive no matter how specifically vague you're being. People all over the country do stupid stuff. It is about those people and individual decisions they made, not where they live, so why brim that into it? If I made a similar comment involving race ("there are SOME purple people who . . .") it would be undeniably offensive. This is no different. Stop stereotyping people.

 

Oh please.  It's not stereotyping to say that there are actually people who do this actual thing, and that it is a known issue.  It has nothing to do with race and everything to do with choices.  If I said that many women in Mongolia breastfeed their children well into adolescence, is that a stereotype?  Is cultural anthropology just a fancy term for stereotyping suddenly??

post #137 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

I live in the south and I find stereotypes about how we're all ignorant rednecks really offensive.

 

Me too.

 

My (rural, Southern) family practice doctor encouraged exclusive breastfeeding and supported with extended nursing.

post #138 of 198

I was being vague about my sister's location because I didn't want to reveal her personal information. She's an MDC member but very busy and so doesn't post much; hopefully someday she can talk about what happened herself.

post #139 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adaline'sMama View Post
 

Seriously, all Im hearing about is how all the doctors that you all know have all given bad advice and been terrible to you. 

This thread is about trusting doctors.  It is hardly surprising that some people are going to come on and tell us why they do not trust doctors. 


Edited by kathymuggle - 11/30/12 at 5:09am
post #140 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

I take doctors, likes people, on a case by case basis. I've known good ones and bad ones. I probably tend to give them the benefit of the doubt, though, because I've known,ore good than bad. I was just talking to my mom today about a medical resident who saved my right leg. While I generally think orthopedic surgeons are kind of arrogant, I'll always be grateful for that one and his expertise.

I'm glad that you've known more good than bad. That explains why you give doctors the benefit of the doubt. I've known more bad than good, by at least a two thirds to one third ratio. That explains why I take what a doctor says with caution. We both are reasonable.
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