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anterior placenta - successful homebirth stories?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

After feeling "off" for about a week, and not feeling any movement after feeling flutters around 15 weeks, I called the midwife and she came by and did a quick Doppler check to make sure things were alright.  Her finding (which will be confirmed via our sonogram next week) is that I have an anterior placenta.  It dulls the sensations of baby's movement and makes it hard for them to find the heartbeat.  

 

Doesn't seem to be a problem for pregnancy, as long as it's not covering the cervix.  But, it seems that the likelihood of the baby presenting posterior is higher (babies like to face the placenta).

 

Does anyone have positive, encouraging stories of homebirth with a posterior baby, or an anterior placenta, or of moving a posterior baby before birth with special movements?

 

TIA!

post #2 of 14
I don't have any myself, but I did a quick search in the birth stories forum and found this one and this one it looks like there are others. Good luck!

And for my natural hospital birth, my baby was facing the right way (I felt her turning in the birth canal, I thought it was cool!), but she had her hand up by her face and I did have a 2nd degree tear, but no problems getting her out.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the encouraging links.  I'm up for a challenge.  After being confined to bed for my first labor because of blood pressure problems, I think I can do anything! 

 

My daughter also had a nuchal hand!  She kept that hand up by her face for several months after she was born.  And I felt her squirm and wiggle and turn in the birth canal too!  And kick me on the way out.  That really hurt.

post #4 of 14

I have never really thought about an anterior placenta affecting fetal positioning, though I suppose it is possible. As a labor and delivery RN, I have seen many babies turn from posterior in labor to anterior. I am pretty sure I had an anterior placenta with both my pregnancies as well, and had 2 fast births (3 hrs with nuchal arm, and 1 hr - with a 10.5 lb baby). Check out http://www.spinningbabies.com   especifically:

http://www.spinningbabies.com/baby-positions/anterior-placenta There are many things you can do, especially after 35 weeks to encourage optimal fetal positioning.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by berrymama View Post

I have never really thought about an anterior placenta affecting fetal positioning, though I suppose it is possible. As a labor and delivery RN, I have seen many babies turn from posterior in labor to anterior. I am pretty sure I had an anterior placenta with both my pregnancies as well, and had 2 fast births (3 hrs with nuchal arm, and 1 hr - with a 10.5 lb baby). Check out http://www.spinningbabies.com   especifically:

http://www.spinningbabies.com/baby-positions/anterior-placenta There are many things you can do, especially after 35 weeks to encourage optimal fetal positioning.

I second the spinning babies website!

post #6 of 14
post #7 of 14

My son was posterior (but my placenta wasn't) as well and while I think it prolonged my labour, it didn't cause any complications otherwise. And he flipped as he came out:)

 

If possible I would like to prevent it happening again, but it wouldn't be a disaster if it did:) I was told that sitting forward rather than leaning back help, that is one reason I am looking at getting an exercise ball soon. Hopefully it does the trick:)

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you all!  I feel very encouraged that this won't be anything to worry about.  So long as the cord is nice and long, there should be no trouble turning the proper way for birth!

post #9 of 14

I also have an anterior placenta.  I hadn't heard of baby's positioning being affected by the placenta's placement!  I am grateful you asked this question and for the links provided by others.  So much to learn!

post #10 of 14

am another one with an anterior placenta (altho they find baby and heart beat easily and ive been feeling baby from 11 weeks.. hate to think what id feel with a posterior placenta ;) ) thankyou for the info
 

post #11 of 14
I had an anterior placenta with my first, and I was told by my midwife to go on my hands and knees for about 15 minutes, just whenever I had the time, just to encourage the baby to stay anterior. (Or turn anterior) she also said, don't lay on the couch, sit on an exercise ball or do the hands and knees thing. That was when I was 36 weeks she told me to start doing that. I wasn't told about the fact that babies like to face their placentas, but she just wanted to make sure baby was in the optimal position! I had no issues with back labor, or anything like that. I also sat on the birthing ball for 3-4 hours while I was in early labor. My son was born with his hand up by his face, but I never felt that turning sensation that most you Moms are talking about! Probably cause he was anterior from 36 weeks on! I spent a lot of time on the ball and on my hands and knees making sure he stayed that way! smile.gif
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama4life14 View Post

I had an anterior placenta with my first, and I was told by my midwife to go on my hands and knees for about 15 minutes, just whenever I had the time, just to encourage the baby to stay anterior. (Or turn anterior) she also said, don't lay on the couch, sit on an exercise ball or do the hands and knees thing. That was when I was 36 weeks she told me to start doing that. I wasn't told about the fact that babies like to face their placentas, but she just wanted to make sure baby was in the optimal position! I had no issues with back labor, or anything like that. I also sat on the birthing ball for 3-4 hours while I was in early labor. My son was born with his hand up by his face, but I never felt that turning sensation that most you Moms are talking about! Probably cause he was anterior from 36 weeks on! I spent a lot of time on the ball and on my hands and knees making sure he stayed that way! smile.gif

 

Thanks for that!  As a Bradley mama, I spend lots of time hands and knees doing pelvic rocks, so hopefully that does the trick!  Bradley also encourages no couch sitting - rather sitting cross-legged on the floor or squatting.  

post #13 of 14

I had an OP baby last time and let me tell you that young man NEVER turned despite sitting on the birth ball, chiro, massage, spinning babies....And boy was that OP labor a pain in the back hehe. But he came out fine and all was well :-)

I am not sure where my placenta was last time BUT I just so happen to know that my placenta is anterior this time. It took me much longer to feel movement this time around and my mw said it was probably due to an anterior placenta. This was confirmed a few weeks later when I had my anatomy scan ultrasound. I have never heard that babies like to face their placenta so I can't help you there.

 

I have also seen many babies turn as the come down the birth canal (I am also an L&D nurse) so it is more than possible. I would not freak out about OP though as lots of babies come out that way with no trouble at all. If my baby is OP this time I think I may chalk it up to how my pelvis is shaped just turns my babies that way lol. Since I have already had an OP labor I already know what I am in for...counter-pressure and more counter-pressure!

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the story!  I wasn't watching my DD come down the canal (felt like my eyes would pop out of my head if I opened them to look into the mirror!  Isn't labor strange?!), but I felt a lot of squirming and even kicking (OW) as she descended.  I'm wondering if she was turning.  No idea!  I'm excited to see what labor holds this time around.

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