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don't home school unless u have a masters in education

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 

I was a traveling teacher- going home to home-- and the people who home school usually couldn't mult never mind read.  The kids were always running the neighborhood or just watching t.v.   your children need to socialize with other children or how are they going to make it in the real world.

post #2 of 33
Why don't you take a few minutes to read through some of the homeschool forum. Maybe you will see how ignorant and judgmental you sound after reading the articulate and intelligent discussions by homeschooling parents.
post #3 of 33

yeahthat.gif

post #4 of 33

I find at interesting since statistically home school do better on their SAT/ACT's and such. Clearly home schooled kids are learning just fine.

 

http://www.hslda.org/docs/nche/000010/200410250.asp

 

"...homeschool children in this study averaged in 85th percentile while the public school students averaged in the 50th percentile on nationally standardized achievement tests."

post #5 of 33

I'm not a home schooler, but even *I* found this offensive!

post #6 of 33

Your own post lacks proper grammar. Normally that wouldn't stand out, but considering you are here to talk about how uneducated and unsocialized my children are, I'd assume your efforts in communicating that would look better than a couple of poorly put together sentences.  Just sayin'.

post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizawill View Post

Your own post lacks proper grammar. Normally that wouldn't stand out, but considering you are here to talk about how uneducated and unsocialized my children are, I'd assume your efforts in communicating that would look better than a couple of poorly put together sentences.  Just sayin'.

Probably just a nobody trying to rile us up. Too bad we all know what a ridiculous post it was. ;)

post #8 of 33

ROTFLMAO.gif

post #9 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmbartvt View Post

I was a traveling teacher- going home to home-- and the people who home school usually couldn't mult never mind read.  The kids were always running the neighborhood or just watching t.v.   your children need to socialize with other children or how are they going to make it in the real world.

 

WOW.

post #10 of 33

biglaugh.gifGood morning!

post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmbartvt View Post

I was a traveling teacher- going home to home-- and the people who home school usually couldn't mult never mind read.  The kids were always running the neighborhood or just watching t.v.   your children need to socialize with other children or how are they going to make it in the real world.

 

 

Okay. You've convinced me to stop homeschooling immediately because I only have a BA and it isn't in education.

 

Well, maybe I won't quit just yet. I have a few questions.

 

I do not know any "traveling teachers". I wonder why you visited these homeschool families. Were your visits to their homes in some official capacity or do you just go door-to-door on your own for fun? What do you do now that you are no longer a traveling teacher?

 

Do you consider yourself qualified to homeschool even though your written communication is so poor? Everyone has strengths and weaknesses and I'm sure that you would find a way to overcome your weak areas if you were to homeschool. Out of curiosity, what would you feel qualified to teach?

 

Do you have children of your own?

 

What would be your ideal plan for homeschooled children- with a qualified instructor- to socialize with other kids and learn to make it in the real world?  What could a parent do to ensure these needs are met in your view? Could they possibly join groups or go on field trips?

 

What do you mean by mult?

 

I'm glad you brought up TV. In our home we only watch selected dvd's instead of broadcast television. We've been considered odd for that choice.

Do you feel that children who go to a traditional school should also be TV free or have very limited screen time? Do you have a similar post planned for the school forum about how those children should be doing their homework and not watching TV or running around the neighborhood?

post #12 of 33

This thread is closed for moderator review. 

post #13 of 33

I have reopened this thread because I think the HS families are doing a good job of educating the OP about the limitations of her experience and about the broader culture and value of homeschooling. 

post #14 of 33

Intimately knowing your "student" over the long term and intimately, personally, directly caring about his or her well-being decades into the future, trumps any supposed expertise at managing a classroom or juggling curriculum rubrics. I have several friends who have education degrees who homeschool their children, and they firmly believe that their education training was actually a hindrance when it came to homeschooling. It locked them into assumptions about education that were counter-productive in a home environment. Homeschooling demands an entirely different skill-set, one that falls outside the perspective of traditional schooling.

 

I wonder if you would be interested in the results of a large study carried out by research institute in Canada? It showed that homeschooling improves educational outcomes of children whose parents have low levels of education. The biggest predictor is success in school is the educational background of the child's parents. It's a sad cycle: if the parents did poorly in school, the children will tend to do poorly. But homeschooling breaks that cycle. Children homeschooled by parents with low levels of education don't do quite as well as children homeschooled by parents with graduate degrees, but they do better than they would have if they had stayed in school. 

 

To quote this article on the Fraser Institute study and research review:

 

"students taught at home by mothers who never finished high school scored a full 55 percentage points higher than public school students from families with comparable education levels."

 

I'm not sure that I know how to 'mult,' as you say, but my kids certainly excel as math. My 9-year-old is killing an 8th-grade school curriculum. My just-turned-14-year-old is now in school and has 100% in her pre-calc course. Neither of them did any formal curriculum in math until the 3rd grade level.

 

It's true, they have spent a lot of time running around the neighbourhood -- or in our case, the forest. That's because homeschooling in interest-led ways, guided by readiness and passion, is so much more efficient than traditional schooling. In fact, the main reason we chose to homeschool was to give our kids time to be active, creative, social and curious creatures while still being challenged intellectually. 

 

I hope the spirit of the holiday season will open your mind a little, and that you will reconsider the wisdom of posting negative, judgemental comments in what is designed to be a support community. 

 

Miranda

post #15 of 33

Nice, one, Moomingmama!!  What a wonderful post. Thank you and thanks to all of you for posting to the thread to help a new member understand HS...even if that's not quite why she posted. Sometimes we don't get quite what we asked for when we come to MDC - sometimes we get so, so much more!  love.gif

post #16 of 33
Home school is so different i don't think you can really even compare the two. I know i had a traditional education and went into this trying to school at home with mine. When i let go and let them lead me in teaching them we got so much further ahead! Some days we don't do much but read stories, play, watch videos and cook together but they learn then too. Other days they do nothing but 'school work' because they want to. They enjoy learning and i know that love will keep them going much more than being drilled with curriculum. Socialization isn't an issue either since our open schedule allows for trips and visits at will. I really think it's more about family than anything else though. The image put forth of homeschooled kids watching video and running the neighborhood loose sounds like that would be the same family not helping if the kid was in school either. Truth is most homeschooled parents are loving involved parents doing what is best for their kids and would do that even if the kids were in school... see the posts by some of us that have done both or even have some at home and some in school. I think the parents here have it covered and we have this forum for help and support if needed but thanks op.
post #17 of 33

I have a BA in English and a teaching credential and not officially a Masters in English (I failed the last test but I had a great GPA--I couldn't hand write fast enough for the final exam) so I guess I'm not up for this.

 

*deep sigh* I guess it's back to the drawing board. I suppose it is a good thing I have the internet to set me straight.

post #18 of 33

I was a teacher, with Advanced Teacher Status and an MA in education.

 

I think my qualifications and experience hold me back at times.  The times they hold me back are the ones where I attempt to teach my children the way I was taught to teach, instead of stepping back and letting them thrive the way they know how to learn, the way they were born learning - through immersion not memorisation, through enthusiasm not demands and through self belief not fear of poor test scores.

post #19 of 33

Thanks for this thread.  It's really so good to be able to look at an opening post like this, see the flaws in it (that are nothing to do with the several mechanical mistakes) and know that, not only am I doing the right thing by my children but that the arguments against what we're doing look completely ludicrous when written down.  

post #20 of 33

I like this article on the subject:

 

http://besthomeschooling.org/articles/linda_dobson2.html

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