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fluff thread - eating pet peeves - Page 6

post #101 of 154
Ohhh
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post

I thought of another one. When someone leaves a peanut butter smear in the jam jar. I like PB&Js, but I do not want my morning toast to have a faint PB taste. I buy 2 jars of jam now, and hide one in the back of the fridge to use on my toast.

Crumbs in the butter dish drive me nuts too.[/qu

Ohhh. Red pepper trail in the hummus.
post #102 of 154
Not an eating pet peeve, but food related. I don't know what's up with my MIL and her weird dessert pairings. She'll offer apple pie and ice cream, but the ice cream flavour choices are creamsicle or Rolo or some other weird flavour. I just want some vanilla ice cream on my pie!
post #103 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by newmamalizzy View Post

Ohhh
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post

I thought of another one. When someone leaves a peanut butter smear in the jam jar. I like PB&Js, but I do not want my morning toast to have a faint PB taste. I buy 2 jars of jam now, and hide one in the back of the fridge to use on my toast.

Crumbs in the butter dish drive me nuts too.[/qu

Ohhh. Red pepper trail in the hummus.


Yeah, and black bean trails in the sour cream!

post #104 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibiscus mum View Post

Not an eating pet peeve, but food related. I don't know what's up with my MIL and her weird dessert pairings. She'll offer apple pie and ice cream, but the ice cream flavour choices are creamsicle or Rolo or some other weird flavour. I just want some vanilla ice cream on my pie!


That's called the "whatever was on sale" special winky.gif

post #105 of 154
I was raised to believe that you should never use the same utensil for two different jars of food. If one is making a pb&j, one would use a knife to take out the peanut butter and spread it. A teaspoon is used to scoop out some jam and deposit it on the sandwich where it was spread over the top of the peanut butter. Then wipe the knife on the other side to clean it before cutting the sandwich in half.
post #106 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post

I was raised to believe that you should never use the same utensil for two different jars off food. If one is making a pb&j, one would use a knife to take out the peanut butter and spread it. A teaspoon is used to scoop out some jam and deposit it on the sandwich where it was spread over the top of the peanut butter. Then wipe the knife on the other side to clean it before cutting the sandwich in half.

 

Yep, me too.  Our jam pots had their own dedicated spoons for each variety.  The thought of a speck of jelly in the peanut butter makes me shiver .  And one would never, for example, spread ketchup on a burger with a knife and then use the same knife to dispense mayo but as an adult, I now know there are many people in the world that don't operate under this system.

post #107 of 154
Quote:
I was raised to believe that you should never use the same utensil for two different jars off food.

 

This just seems like one of those things that shouldn't need to be taught, because it's obviously icky.  But I guess it matters more to some than others.

 

I use as few utentsils as possible to make a pb&j, so I don't use a spoon to serve up the jam. I use the one knife, but I always spread the jam first. Then I carefully wipe the knife on the other slice and only then do I use it to spread the peanut butter.

 

And I guess the difference is when I'm making sandwiches for everyone I use just the knife if possible.  When there's a bunch of bottles for a bunch of people, like hamburgers, I provide separate knives for different foods.  Though I don't bother to spread the ketchup or mustard if I used a squirt bottle.

post #108 of 154
My pet peeve is when an adult guest serves him/herself a huge helping and eats less than half of it. I like leftovers but NOT off someone else's plate. I don't mind if kids leave behind lots, they are learning what they like and experimenting. I was brought up not to waste food: take what you're gonna eat and get seconds/thirds if you need it. I think by age 30 most people should have figured out how to coordinate portion sizes with current appetite. Is this an unreasonable expectation?
post #109 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by skycheattraffic View Post

My pet peeve is when an adult guest serves him/herself a huge helping and eats less than half of it. I like leftovers but NOT off someone else's plate. I don't mind if kids leave behind lots, they are learning what they like and experimenting. I was brought up not to waste food: take what you're gonna eat and get seconds/thirds if you need it. I think by age 30 most people should have figured out how to coordinate portion sizes with current appetite. Is this an unreasonable expectation?

 

Not at all. My ex used to do this at my mom's all the time, and it drove her crazy. He wasted a lot of food.

post #110 of 154

People who request gluten free dinner while they are in fact not  allergy to gluten and do not have Celiac decease. In fact, anyone who ask me for specific accommodations that are not allergy related.  I am not going to make a tofu variation of my Shepard pie because someone decide to become a vegan. Have salad. No, I do not have money for a grass fed beef either. Eat what I serve or do not come for the meal part of the evening.

post #111 of 154

I'm guessing you don't have a lot of Jewish or Muslim friends over for meals, then?

 

I accommodate dietary preferences for the most part. The only thing that really annoys me is when I know the person in question cheats or is inconsistent. F'rinstance, I have one sister who's vegetarian and occasionally vegan. She's not much of a communicator, so on the rare occasions I see her I make vegan alternatives. If I don't, she purses her lips and makes snarky comments about how cream cheese isn't a vegetable, etc. But if I do, she's just as likely to have a scoop of my vegan sorbet AND a scoop of my dairy-riddled ice cream - or even a dish with cheese or gelatine, which isn't even vegetarian. And yes, that bugs me, especially because I generally loathe making vegan food. (Well, not sorbet... but whenever I do a savoury dish I'm tormented by the thought that it would be better with chicken stock, butter or cheese!)

 

I've also had "gluten-free" or "dairy-free" folk eat my GF/DF alternatives, then have a look at the other food I've made and go "Oh, that looks so yummy... maybe just this once". It's flattering, but I'd rather not go to the extra trouble for no good reason, you know?

 

And then there's the relative who doesn't eat sugar. But if she's over for a visit and I offer her a cookie or cake, she'll eat it, say how yummy it is, and then judge me for putting sugar in it. Huh?

post #112 of 154
Lack of basic hygiene.

My mother-in-law once helped herself to a handful of nuts, with grimy, black streaked hands, on her way to the sink to wash her hands. I was grossed out, and tried to give her the rest of the nuts when she was leaving.

Her daughter once soaked her foot (the entire sole was black) in a dishpan, then dumped the water and refilled it, using it to rinse the dishes she was washing. We had just finished eating dinner off those dishes.
post #113 of 154

I do not have Muslim friends and my Jewish friends not observant. If someone requests no pork for religious reason, I would accommodate but it would not be possible to make my kitchen kosher.

 

In my state, you can invite 6 people for dinner and each of them will have different  and excluding preferences. It is ridiculous.

post #114 of 154
Quote:

Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

 She's not much of a communicator, so on the rare occasions I see her I make vegan alternatives. If I don't, she purses her lips and makes snarky comments about how cream cheese isn't a vegetable, etc. But if I do, she's just as likely to have a scoop of my vegan sorbet AND a scoop of my dairy-riddled ice cream - or even a dish with cheese or gelatine, which isn't even vegetarian. 

 

I've also had "gluten-free" or "dairy-free" folk eat my GF/DF alternatives, then have a look at the other food I've made and go "Oh, that looks so yummy... maybe just this once". It's flattering, but I'd rather not go to the extra trouble for no good reason, you know?

 

Ugh, that's annoying.  I make gluten-free foods for people with celiac who don't eat gluten at all -- I generally try to keep some aside.  There are those who are avoiding gluten for health reasons, but then will eat it if they think the food looks good. Thankfully most people are fairly protective of those who can't eat the gluten.

post #115 of 154

Man if I had these situations when inviting families to join us for dinner, I would simply never invite the picky people again.  Of course it would be different if someone important to me had an allergy, but thankfully I haven't had to deal with that much---and it sounds so annoying.  I do have a somewhat vegetarian friend but she eats fish occasionally so I just make a tuna or salmon based dish if her family is coming over.  Maybe just invite people over for wine/cocktails (non-alcoholic for those who don't drink) and a board game?

 

Putting the shoe on the other foot, I don't eat any red meat.  Only poultry and fish.  And that's been consistently the case for decades so not hard for people to figure out if it's my current fad.  My fiance's mom has known that for years but she doesn't always bother to prepare food without red meat in it while we are visiting her home.   But, it doesn't really bother me, I just feel disappointed that I can't have anything hot and savory that meal.  So, I just eat the salad and a piece of bread with butter and cheese on it and make myself a snack later on.  I feel like it's a decent trade off for having someone else do all the cooking for me and mine while we are guests for a day or a few days.  Some meals won't appeal or suit my diet at ALL, and I'll just make the best of it because I'm a grown up.  I guess since I'm willing to be a trooper about it, I don't think I would be so accommodating about other people's dietary pickiness when sitting at my table.  I make food, I offer it, and you can eat it if it suits.  They could always help themselves to a piece of fruit or bread or whatever in my kitchen (since there are always families with kids visiting, the adults are always helping themselves to what they need for their little ones in my kitchen anyways) to tide them over until they got home.  


It's hard cooking for more than 8 people, and I ain't too willing to make it harder, or then I know I just won't ever host.
 

post #116 of 154
As someone with severe food allergies, I can tell you it's not fun to be the guest, either.

I didn't ask anyone to accommodate my intolerances, after they reached a certain level. I brought my own food. But that caused it's own problems, as hosts were insulted, and insisted they had, or could have, accommodated my needs. No amount of explaining how I wanted to keep the visit enjoyable for the host as well as myself made a difference. I stopped accepting invitations for meals, eventually. It makes for a quiet holidays!
post #117 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alenushka View Post

 

 

In my state, you can invite 6 people for dinner and each of them will have different  and excluding preferences. It is ridiculous.

 

It's getting to that point here too.  Ironically, I know a couple of people with multiple life-threatening food allergies, and they are far easier to have over (they're vigilant, but not fussy) than some of the people I know with food-restrictions-by-choice.
 

post #118 of 154

Quote:

Originally Posted by rachelsmama View Post

 

It's getting to that point here too.  Ironically, I know a couple of people with multiple life-threatening food allergies, and they are far easier to have over (they're vigilant, but not fussy) than some of the people I know with food-restrictions-by-choice.
 

 

Is it just me or does anyone else feel the food-restrictions-by-choice people are ruining it for people that have real medical issues that restrict their diet? 

 

I used to work with a vegetarian that would not shut up about how the rest of us meat eaters were killing ourselves yet she was the first one racing to the table when there was an office pot luck meat dish or free pepperoni pizza.  We used to give her a hard time about it and she used the "well just this once won't hurt me" excuse.

 

Recently I was at an event where a boxed lunch was provided.  One of the choices was a vegetarian meal.  One of the attendees threw a huge fit about the lack of a vegan offering, it was like she intentionally wanted to draw attention to herself.  The organizers discussed it with the management and it was decided to let her go to the salad bar.  She came back with soup, a salad piled high with cheese and salad dressing and 4 diet cokes.  Really?  you couldn't peacefully eat the fresh fruit and grilled veggie sandwich in the boxed lunch?  You had to throw a fit, make everyone look at you waving your vegan flag only to eat soup and other mainstream items off a salad bar that I can guaranty were not vegan.  (it was a school caf, definately using animal products for the soup and cheese.)

post #119 of 154


The organizers discussed it with the management and it was decided to let her go to the salad bar.  She came back with soup, a salad piled high with cheese and salad dressing and 4 diet cokes.  Really?  you couldn't peacefully eat the fresh fruit and grilled veggie sandwich in the boxed lunch?  You had to throw a fit, make everyone look at you waving your vegan flag only to eat soup and other mainstream items off a salad bar that I can guaranty were not vegan.  (it was a school caf, definately using animal products for the soup and cheese.)

Oh boy, I wouldn't have been able to refrain from pointing out that the options she had chosen were not vegan. 

So I must say, I'm not as picky as my mother was in relation to mixing stuff.  I try not to get peanut butter in the jam, but I might get a little jam in the peanut butter, and then just try and stir it up.  But since I never know when I'm going to be making something that is gluten or nut free, I try keep out cross contamination.

post #120 of 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

As someone with severe food allergies, I can tell you it's not fun to be the guest, either.

I didn't ask anyone to accommodate my intolerances, after they reached a certain level. I brought my own food. But that caused it's own problems, as hosts were insulted, and insisted they had, or could have, accommodated my needs. No amount of explaining how I wanted to keep the visit enjoyable for the host as well as myself made a difference. I stopped accepting invitations for meals, eventually. It makes for a quiet holidays!

I was just going to bring this up!  

 

I never ask anyone to accommodate me.  I generally just eat before I go to dinner and choose what I can.  However, that doesn't keep me from being backed into a corner!  My uber-sensitive MIL asked me once (in her strange statement-question fashion which I find difficult) "Oh, you don't like the apple crisp???".  I hadn't served myself any dessert because the apple crisp being served had oats in it, and I am severely allergic.  I had been happily drinking my coffee with cream and sugar, but suddenly this question.  I answered that I couldn't eat it because of the oats, which made her feel bad.  She is forever trying to accommodate people, everyone, no matter what.  I couldn't answer that I simply wasn't hungry for dessert, which would have been entirely out of character for me that no one would believe it!  

 

This is just one minor instance.  I simply cannot forgo so much of the food being offered without someone noticing and asking.  Then I have to answer and risk making them feel bad for not asking me beforehand.  I generally only attend family dinners.  Any other parties I go to are too big for anyone to notice anything, and if I want to enjoy dinner with one other family, I invite them over to my house.  

 

In general, when people know about my allergies and ask me what I want, I tell them not to worry about accommodating me because it seems to make them happy to not have to change their ideas about what they wanted to serve.  But then the reality of my not being able to choose freely makes them seem embarrassed and regretful.  ::sigh::

 

The biggest annoyance for me is that my sisters think I'm being silly for not eating those foods, just because I did a few years ago.  I couldn't possibly be allergic if I'm not blowing up like a purple balloon, covered in Mt. Everest-size welts, or doubling over in pain, I guess.  Apparently, there is no middle ground, in their opinion.  Won't kill you this minute?  Then eat it!

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