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Don't know what to do with 16 month old - Page 3

post #41 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swd12422 View Post

Some days I feel like I'm totally failing these kids, even though they are far better off than where they started.

Yes! Me, too. Some days I feel like I did my boys a disservice by taking in both of my them instead of just one (no bio relation to each other). Maybe each would be happier if they were the only child with such serious issues in the family. After their adoptions were well underway, a worker we know personally said she was glad things were going OK because she had recommended one of our boys be the only child in a family (he's one of four here!). Ouch. She didn't mean it to hurt; she meant to say she was wrong. At times I have lingered on that and wondered if he deserved such a small family instead of us. But, guess what? Nobody else came forward. We did. We are his family. We are the right family for him. And there are as many benefits to the craziness of a larger family as there are challenges with giving each child the one-on-one time they need. I suspect the same is true in your house.
post #42 of 99
I have heard of many kiddos who have milk allergies that do very well on goats milk. It has the fat and the protein only the proteins are much smaller than in cows milk and I believe it has little or no casein so it is much more friendly to dairy concerns. My LO are very picky about veggies too. One recipe that worked for me was roasting Brussels sprouts . They actually turn out like chips salt and crispy and toddlers eat them up. You can find a number if recipes for them online. I use a simple salt lemon olive oil and roast until crispy ( do cut them in quarters)
post #43 of 99

Hi again!

 

So glad to hear you are seeing results from eliminating foods!  That's awesome!  Isn't it amazing how food effects some people?!?!

 

I don't recall if I recommended it before.  The yahoo group foodlab is a great place to go when you suspect or know a food or foods are an issue.  I went there more than 8 years ago now & it was very helpful, especially in the beginning.

 

Sounds like you've figured out a way to have pizza for everyone w/o giving him gluten.  Bravo!!!  I think you said the others just could not live w/o their gluten.  I'm using small letters because that's a sign that they too have an issue w/ it.  Anything you can't live w/o or just LLLLOOOOOVVVVEEEE is likely a problem.  One thing at a time though orngbiggrin.gif.

 

I doubt I mentioned this before: a food journal/diary can help you to connect the dots.  It was what helped me to discover that corn & corn derived products (like the citric acid that was on the potato nuggets thingies we were eating years ago) were bothering my son.  I wrote down what we ate, the ingredietns, how he slept, and any other notable item so that I could see right in front of me & did not need to rely on memory, which we all know when you're sleep deprived too, is likely not very helpful.

 

That's all I have time for.  You are doing so great!  That boy sure is lucky to have you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Keep up the good work!!! love.gifjoy.gif

 

All the best,

Sus

post #44 of 99
Thread Starter 

Maos211, thanks for the info on goat's milk! I was just coming online to look it up after someone else recommended it.... So people who are on GFCF diets can have goat's milk???

 

The "diet" doesn't seem to be working 100%, so I'm not sure GFCF is working at all for his digestion/rash issues, although I'm going to stick with it for other reasons for now. I'm reasonably certain his sleep issues correlate to his digestive issues but I can't figure out if those are food-derived or something else, like teething. He was just getting better and then yesterday DH changed him and said his butt looked great. Then he pooped AGAIN an hour or two later and his butt was BRIGHT red and so painful he refused to sit on it. I thought for sure he wasn't going to sleep well, but he made it with only a few little cries between 3 and 5 this morning. It's still red, and I'm keeping an eye (and cream) on it, but his poop is much better. But he has not had ANY gluten or dairy this week, and I even cut out oats after he had a problem last week.

 

I am not keeping a formal diary, but his diet is limited right now and I keep close track of what he's having. It's practically all whole foods at this point. The most processed thing he's eating are Rice Chex cereal in the morning and maybe some blue corn chips for a snack (ingredients: corn, oil, salt).

 

He does not like the sardines. :( He's eating them b/c he's hungry, but doesn't like them much. He's loving the sweet potato with coconut oil and he's eating peas again. I haven't tried brussels sprouts with him yet, but I do love them roasted.

 

So here's what he eats:

 

Breakfast: egg, banana, rice cereal

AM Snack: rice milk

Lunch: whole grain w/ sunflower seed butter and peas, or sweet potato mashed with CO and peas or sardines, and fruit for dessert if he's STILL hungry

PM Snack: raisins or frozen blueberries  with coconut milk yogurt ,or corn chips w/ sunflower seed butter, or bell peppers (not a popular choice, but I keep trying)

Dinner: whatever we're having, which usually includes vegetables that he may or may not eat, meat, and rice or potato

Before bed: rice milk

 

I'm trying to come up with other ideas for fast/easy stuff to give him when he's hungry for snack or when we're having something like mac-n-cheese that he just can't have. Suggestions?

post #45 of 99

Wow,I't's so great to see it's going well !

 

How much does he like eggs? If you want him to stay full longer, maybe he could have 2 eggs for breakfast. Some people cook them in coconut oil (2 or 3 tbsp ). This would have the bonus of adding extra fat to his diet that's lacking from the rice milk.

 

As for quick food or snacks, we always have leftover meat of some sort which we shred if we want a quick snack. A filling one is spicy shredded beef and mashed avocado.

You can slice one carrot and cook it in lots of coconut oil while you're making the Mac and cheese. You can pretty much slice any vegetable and cook in coconut oil and you're all set. 

You can keep some boiled eggs in the fridge (don't overcook), and slice one for him as needed. You could even place one or two in a zip lock bag if you're going out to a restaurant and don't want him exposed to gluten . 

 

Slice one apple and cook in coconut oil with cinnamon. So good! 

 

 

 

So, if you try to have a little leftover meat or boiled eggs in the fridge, you can cook him a veggie on the side. Total time: less than five minutes.

 

Since he likes the sweet potato, maybe you can make-ahead gluten free sweet potato pancakes. They're good cold.  Something simple like one small sweet potato, boiled and mashed, one egg, two tablespoons coconut oil, should work. No sugar needed. Maybe some pumpkin pie spices for flavor. Maybe half a mashed banana if you want them fluffier, but I would try without the banana first. 

post #46 of 99

Do you have the option of going to an allergist and getting food allergy testing done?  We finally did this with my DD after she would have belly aches all the time, never slept more than 2-3 hours at a time in her life and woke for long periods of time.  Similar to your foster son's sleeping issues, except she doesn't have any extra issues from exposure or anything. It turns out not only does she have a significant milk allergy, she's also allergic to a number of other things including cod fish, watermelon, strawberries, bananas, cinnamon, and a few other things. Two weeks after fully eliminating the major allergens she was a totally different toddler, and now she sleeps for hours and hours every night!  I majorly regret waiting until 2.5 years old to go to the allergist and nail down what she was actually allergic to.  

post #47 of 99
Thread Starter 

I wish I could. He was tested before he came to us (at about 1 year old) and the results are not clear. The piece of paper from the doctor's office shows no signs of food allergy at all, but the former foster family claims they were told he is allergic to lactose. And they continued to feed him cow's milk yogurt, which the doctor claimed should be okay b/c the cultures should have eaten all the lactose, and cheese of all kinds (regular "real" cheese, cheezits, mac-n-cheese toddler meals....). I don't give him any dairy at all and it's still up in the air as to whether things are improving. I suspect his sleep issues are more about his sensory issues and possibly hunger (or perceived hunger) and not about tummy aches.

 

He has slept through the night nearly all week, although he has made noise several times. Not enough for me to get up and get him, but still thrashing in his crib and vocalizing a bit. I'm calling it progress, but still can't figure out the cause. We go for GI consult next month....

post #48 of 99

I read the first post and the last two so please excuse me if I'm off base here. 

 

What about wearing him? Either in an ergo on your back or using a moby wrap? It made a huge difference for my daughter when she was unhappy but not ready for a nap and it let me get a lot more done. She didn't have sensory issues but I wonder if your fson would benefit from the confinement and contact.

 

Regarding the allergies, he would have been awfully young for any allergy tests before he came to you. I don't even know how accurate the tests would be at this age. My daughter was a few months shy of 3 when we had her tested. It's a blood test. The pediatrician only wanted to test for the top 12 most common food allergies because the full panel of 96 required too much blood. I used to work in the neonatal intensive care unit so I told the phlebotomist to call the people that actually run the blood to verify the actual minimal amount they needed--it was much lower than the normal amount they draw. If it had been too much I would have told them to run part of the tests and we would wait and draw her again later for the rest.

 

The blood tests showed a few different low level allergies. The pediatrician told me she didn't think any were high enough to be an issue. I took her off all the foods. Plus, a few months earlier we had taken her off gluten (her speech improved dramatically when we did that.) For 6 weeks we kept her off all the minimally sensitive foods with no results. Several moms I know kept saying to take her off dairy. I finally did and three days later she had the first solid poops in her life. In time we tried returning all the possibly allergic foods. We couldn't get cane sugar back into her diet as she'd have awful diarrhea. Because of the speech stuff we've kept her off gluten. And, of course, the dairy which did NOT show up on the blood tests.

 

So, why can't you ask his pediatrician to do an allergy panel?

post #49 of 99

Also, drug exposure and attachment issues are obviously a HUGE issue here. However, have you also considered taking him off gluten to see if makes a difference? 

 

I know a number of people who are either confirmed celiacs or who are gluten sensitive. Most of them talk about how foggy their brains feel if they eat gluten, they have sleep issues, and they can be very challenging to be with.

 

The other day a friend said she hasn't been sleeping. I asked her if she knew why. She said, "I've been eating wheat." Another friend has a really nice husband. Unless he accidentally gets gluten. Then he is a certifiable jerk and all I can do is be supportive until the gluten gets out of his system. Another friend (his kids have actual celiac diagnosis) said he doesn't see gut issues when they get gluten. Instead their behavior gets out of control. As a matter of fact, he wasn't aware that fast food french fries are coated in flour. He just noted that when he got them fries as a special treat they were impossible to be around. It was their behavior that had him research regarding fries.

 

So can you take him off gluten for a month or two and see what happens? It may not make a difference, but then again it might. We live gluten free and it took a little while to figure out, but once I did I prefer this diet. Because I avoid processed gluten free foods (they're mainly starch) the foods we eat are so much healthier. I make my own veggie broth, I make tortillas out of mung beans instead of buying white flour. And most of my baking--cakes, pizzas, pie crusts, etc. are made with almond flour. YUMMY.

 

Here are some articles on gluten and neurological stuff:

http://www.adderworld.com/blog1/2008/08/06/norwegian-study-links-milk-and-gluten-with-adhd/

 

http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/commoncomplicationsofcd/a/Gluten-And-Adhd.htm

 

http://www.momseveryday.com/bcs/justformoms/headlines/adhd-gluten-free_139693003.html

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-david-perlmutter-md/gluten-impacts-the-brain_b_785901.html

post #50 of 99
Thread Starter 

SundayCrepes, THANK YOU. I'll check out those links when I get a "spare" moment... ;-)

 

Re: Wearing him. Not an option at all, for either of us, unfortunately. I tried several times. He is too big for me and my back is not as strong as it needs to be, even with an Ergo. And he HATES any sort of confinement. He had a hard time learning sign language b/c he wouldn't even let people hold his hands and show him the signs. Now he's interested enough that he will try to imitate what he sees, so his language is improving. But I laugh every time the therapists suggest another "technique" that involves confining him (like for joint compression, using a weighted blanket for sleeping, even swaddling) b/c he just won't tolerate it. He would probably benefit from being swaddled at night b/c I have noticed that he wakes himself up in the car just twitching in his sleep. But he won't have it. Even hugs are tough, although he does like to cuddle so we do a lot of that for bonding/attachment.

 

I have taken him off gluten and all dairy. It has been a couple of months, but with some slips here and there (like the day he got into our other FS's school snack and ate Cheezits, of all things -- double whammy!). He seems to be doing much better this week. Sleeping better, pooping better for a few days. So I'll be interested to see how he does from here on out if I can keep him from contaminating himself. I'm not entirely convinced it has anything to do with gluten, but since I keep seeing things about how GFCF helps kids with sensory issues, I'll do it til I'm comfortable testing to see if it does affect him. I'd rather he have several months with us where he's feeling good before I do that though.

 

I didn't realize I could ask the ped for allergy testing. She is the one who referred him to the allergist, who did a skin prick test on him. (Which I have also heard is NOT the way to go, for anyone else who is reading. Apparently, the skin prick tests can actually stimulate allergic reactions in people who may otherwise not have had them, so the recommendation is to do a blood test instead.) I'll ask her for a blood test and see what she can do. I got clarification on the lactose issue from someone on his case: She said that the FFM said he had horrible diarrhea when she gave him milk, but it improved when he was off of it. Cheese and yogurt didn't have the same effect, so she continued to give him those things, that it was just the milk itself that caused digestive issues for him. But since casein can be an issue for kids with sensory disorders I'll lay off it for now regardless. 

 

It's getting harder to feed this kid b/c he's entering that picky stage and has decided he doesn't like eggs. I can get half of one into him with ketchup, but basically he won't eat anything that's not sweet. Cooked carrots yesterday had to have agave nectar on them before he'd eat them. He'll eat fruit all day long, but with his stomach like it is, that's obviously not a good idea. He has been practically grain-free (except rice milk) for a couple of weeks and his stomach is much better, so now I'm afraid to re-introduce ANY grains. He seems to have issues with rice (cooked brown rice) but not with the rice milk. I was giving him quinoa, but that was when his stomach was still off and on and he was also getting little doses of gluten and dairy here and there. I'm going to try to reintroduce quinoa, and also come up with some better egg recipes that include other veggies and get him off his sweet  streak before it becomes too ingrained.

 

Poor little guy. He is doing SO much better but still has so far to go. I read in his (HUGE) file that his FFM (who has fostered for several decades, specializes in drug-exposed infants, and has had over 50 kids pass through her home) said that he is the worst case she has ever seen. I'm so glad they didn't show me that before we agreed to take him. I already feel like I'm struggling -- I wasn't sure I was prepared for this. I definitely wouldn't have thought I could do it with that kind of endorsement from her.

 

ETA: And we're back to nasty poop! ARGH! He was doing so great the past couple of days and I thought if he made it through the next day or two maybe we'd be clear. Nope. Nasty this afternoon, out of the blue. Mucus, maybe? He's been pretty runny between teething and what I'm hoping is spring allergies.


Edited by swd12422 - 3/28/13 at 3:33pm
post #51 of 99

I hope those articles help.

 

I know someone that is so gluten sensitive that she cannot put manure on her lawn. If the cows ate grass or hay that was grown next to a wheat field and wheat pollen blew onto the grass and the cow's ate it and it passed through their systems and then they pooped it out and she put the poop on her lawn, breathing in the gluten from the wheat pollen would make her ghastly sick. Some people are just ultra sensitive.

 

Did you know that 40% of non-organic chicken sold in the US has been injected with broth and usually it contains gluten? 

 

Did you know that the Trader Joe's brand of hummus contains, I think it's called cultured dextrose. When I tried to find out what that is the results said it's a milk-based item.

 

If you do get blood tests, ask the pediatrician for a prescription for Emla. It's a topical anesthetic. You put it on the skin 45 minutes or an hour before an injection or blood draw and it numbs the area. I have insisted my kids have that prior to every blood draw (we are deferring vaxes otherwise they'd have had it before vaccines.) My kids sat calmly watching the blood get drawn since it doesn't hurt. The only reason I can think of why they don't do this for every injection is cost. It's about $1 or $2 per dose. Blood draws and IV starts can be a bit trickier with Emla but it's never been a problem for my kids.

post #52 of 99
Thread Starter 

Thanks again, Sunday.

 

I just read all the links and they are very interesting -- just more of what I have seen/read elsewhere but it confirms so much. I'm very surprised that with this much info out there that the therapists don't know more about it, esp the one whose son is on the spectrum.

 

And sadly, yes, I did know about TJ's hummus, b/c I accidentally "glutened" a good friend's daughter at my son's birthday party one year. :( She is allergic to gluten, dairy, soy, and eggs. It was so hard to find snacks that could be shared when they were babies and the snack-cup-exchange was inevitable. I just found out about fast food fries, too.... She is the most allergic/sensitive person I have ever heard of -- until your manure story. That's just crazy. Except that it confirms a lot of my suspicions about my own allergies and how weirdly sensitive I am sometimes.

 

Cultured dextrose, caramel color, what else should I be looking for? I'm primarily sticking to whole foods b/c it's way easier and also way healthier. But STBAS was up for nearly 3 hours last night and I have no idea why. He's been "clean" for two weeks! I just want to get to two whole weeks of sleep and no tummy issues. Is that too much to ask?

 

I think DH is just going to have to get on board with dinners being way healthier than they've been. They haven't been bad, per se, but lots of wheat and dairy in them. I'm about to start DS on a GFCF diet too, b/c his behavior is spiraling out of control and I'm not sure if it's diet or the chaos that comes with fostering.

post #53 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swd12422 View Post

Thanks again, Sunday.

 

I just read all the links and they are very interesting -- just more of what I have seen/read elsewhere but it confirms so much. I'm very surprised that with this much info out there that the therapists don't know more about it, esp the one whose son is on the spectrum.

 

And sadly, yes, I did know about TJ's hummus, b/c I accidentally "glutened" a good friend's daughter at my son's birthday party one year. :( She is allergic to gluten, dairy, soy, and eggs. It was so hard to find snacks that could be shared when they were babies and the snack-cup-exchange was inevitable. I just found out about fast food fries, too.... She is the most allergic/sensitive person I have ever heard of -- until your manure story. That's just crazy. Except that it confirms a lot of my suspicions about my own allergies and how weirdly sensitive I am sometimes.

 

Cultured dextrose, caramel color, what else should I be looking for? I'm primarily sticking to whole foods b/c it's way easier and also way healthier. But STBAS was up for nearly 3 hours last night and I have no idea why. He's been "clean" for two weeks! I just want to get to two whole weeks of sleep and no tummy issues. Is that too much to ask?

 

I think DH is just going to have to get on board with dinners being way healthier than they've been. They haven't been bad, per se, but lots of wheat and dairy in them. I'm about to start DS on a GFCF diet too, b/c his behavior is spiraling out of control and I'm not sure if it's diet or the chaos that comes with fostering.

 

Hiya,

 

Glad to hear you've been having success.  It's hard to know when all the sudden you have a night like last night what the problem is.  I know w/ my children, the more we worked hard to elminate gluten, the less it took to gluten the child.  So, if your dh is cooking w/ gluten & dairy, your foster son may be reacting to the smaller amounts of gluten he's being exposed to.  And, like the woman who can't have manure on her lawn, it may be that FS can't have gluten in the house (& he may not be able to go to the bakery department of the food store since there will be gluten in the air or the food store all together :-/).  Anything that comes in contact w/ the gluten (plates, serving utensils, eating utensils, items it was cooked in or prepared on, washed with, washed in, a place where some of the food fell, etc.) will be contaminated w/ gluten.  And, depending on what the gluten was (flour?), it may be in the air or laying on surfaces.  This is why we do not bring any gluten into our house because the possibility of cross contamination is just too great.

 

My dh had a lot of trouble believing foods were causing an issue for our children.  He did. not. want to give up eggs.  But we had to.  Things were much easier for the whole family once dh got on board.  I can ask him if he'd be willing to email w/ your dh if you think that would help.

 

If you haven't joined foodlab (I think I'd suggested it earlier - its a yahoo group), it's still an option.  It gets more traffic than here does too & it's all about what you're going through.  Even if you join just to search & read through old posts.  No requirement to post or reply.  winky.gif

 

Did you mean you'd like help figuring out where dairy is?  Kellymom.com used to have a cheat sheet you could print that was business card size so you could put it in your wallet.  I'll go look to see if it's still there...I can't find it.  But, I believe I still have it.  So, if you want it, PM me w/ your email address & I'll scan it & send it to you.

 

This is a tough road, no doubt.  You are doing so well!  He's so lucky to have you for his mom! joy.gif You pay attention to him & aren't making him suffer more for something he can't control.  What an awesome lady you are!!!  bow.gif

 

Best wishes,

Sus

post #54 of 99

I'm wondering if the bad poop is from candida / yeast issues - especially if his bottom is getting red just from the poop. Yeast can wreak havoc on the GI system, can cause rashes, sleep issues, sensory issues, joint pain...basically lots of things. I know kids with autism can get help from candida cleanses, so maybe with sensory issues he can too.  I would take him to a naturopath to get checked out for yeast and at that age he will need something more natural I belive, but not positive.

 

Also, since you are cutting out gluten and dairy you may need to go at least a full 6 weeks before seeing improvement. His body will be detoxing off the foods and will need time to get it all out of his system. And detoxing can be horrible for a person so if in some areas he seems to be getting worse, it could be the detoxing issue.

 

Also - red dye can be a trigger as well.  It can cause a lot of emotional and behavior problems. Well, dyes & preservatives in general.

 

One more thing. Vaccines. Do you know if he's up to date on shots? Or if he's gotten any while in your care? I would most definitely try to get around him not getting vaccines, get a medical exemption. Not only can the shots cause more sensory problems with him, it can cause more GI problems if his immune system is already down.

post #55 of 99
Thread Starter 

I cannot get out of vaccinations -- all kids in foster care are required to stay on schedule. Once the adoption is finalized, I'll be much more selective.

 

We already cut out dyes, etc. And thanks to DS's poor little friend, and another friend I have who just found out she has celiac disease, I know about the "dust" and "protein transfer."

 

I have thought about yeast too, and gave him what are labeled as "dairy free/vegan" probiotics. I believe they were also labeled gluten free. I'm not sure, but they may have contributed to the problem so he's off them for now. Since he can't have casein, yogurt is out for getting probiotics into him to control the yeast. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to take him to a naturopath while he's "in the system" but I'll have to check. I assumed he was too young for any kind of cleanse. What does that entail? How do they test for yeast?

 

I think I signed up for foodlab... I know I signed up at one of the yahoo groups that covers GFCF, but that might have been something different. I'll have to check. And then, of course, there's the amount of time it takes to surf.... Maybe I should be including "research" as part of the reason he should get an adoption subsidy! Who can work for a living and figure all this out AND raise the other kids AND do the laundry? Seriously, PM me if you can, b/c I could use some time management tips! ;-)

 

I just tried giving him cooked carrots, potatoes and string beans in gravy. He hates it. :(

post #56 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swd12422 View Post

 

I have thought about yeast too, and gave him what are labeled as "dairy free/vegan" probiotics. I believe they were also labeled gluten free. I'm not sure, but they may have contributed to the problem so he's off them for now. Since he can't have casein, yogurt is out for getting probiotics into him to control the yeast. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to take him to a naturopath while he's "in the system" but I'll have to check. I assumed he was too young for any kind of cleanse. What does that entail? How do they test for yeast?

 

 

I believe they can just test his poop for yeast. I know when cleansing from yeast it will come out in the stool.

 

Read Jenny McCarthy's book "Louder Than Words" - it describes really great what she did to cleanse her autistic young son of candida, including the meds he took and the natural approaches she used. It also described really well the effects of the cleanse and what to watch for.

 

http://www.livestrong.com/article/317039-yeast-free-diet-for-kids/

post #57 of 99

My daughter can eat Amande brand yogurt because it's made from almonds and fruit juice. There's a coconut milk one out there but it has cane sugar so she can't eat it. We don't do much soy so I don't know what those alternatives are.

 

Here's a link for coconut cashew yogurt drink. You have to add probiotics so I'm not sure what to recommend, but maybe you'll find something. http://paleoparents.com/featured/guest-post-spunky-coconut-making-cashew-milk/

 

Here's a list of ingredients that contain gluten: http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html

 

Some common ingredients would be anything malted, caramel coloring, soy sauce (tamari is wheat free.)

 

I've heard the best source of bacteria is good, healthy dirt. We live Arizona so it's not a naturally occurring substance around here so I let my daughter play in the good quality potting soil I just bought for my container garden. And, of course, our worm bin.

post #58 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swd12422 View Post

I cannot get out of vaccinations -- all kids in foster care are required to stay on schedule. Once the adoption is finalized, I'll be much more selective.

 

We already cut out dyes, etc. And thanks to DS's poor little friend, and another friend I have who just found out she has celiac disease, I know about the "dust" and "protein transfer."

 

I have thought about yeast too, and gave him what are labeled as "dairy free/vegan" probiotics. I believe they were also labeled gluten free. I'm not sure, but they may have contributed to the problem so he's off them for now. Since he can't have casein, yogurt is out for getting probiotics into him to control the yeast. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to take him to a naturopath while he's "in the system" but I'll have to check. I assumed he was too young for any kind of cleanse. What does that entail? How do they test for yeast?

 

I think I signed up for foodlab... I know I signed up at one of the yahoo groups that covers GFCF, but that might have been something different. I'll have to check. And then, of course, there's the amount of time it takes to surf.... Maybe I should be including "research" as part of the reason he should get an adoption subsidy! Who can work for a living and figure all this out AND raise the other kids AND do the laundry? Seriously, PM me if you can, b/c I could use some time management tips! ;-)

 

I just tried giving him cooked carrots, potatoes and string beans in gravy. He hates it. :(

 

I know nothing about the rules for foster children, so take this for what it's worth.  If his doctor recognizes his problems, could that person write a note or whatever would be necessary to have the vax'ing temporarily stopped?  Not predicting the future, just stopped until you get things under control?

 

You said you started giving him probiotics.  Probiotics can definitely be helpful, but if they cause the stuff that's not supposed to be in his system to start to die, that can cause symptoms (headache, irritable, sleep issues, etc.) that make it look like he's reacting to something but the probioticis are just taking the place of the bad stuff in his system.

 

If you decide to do some kind of candida cleanse (I have no personal experience w/ them)), then you will need to replace the bad stuff w/ good stuff, either by using fermented foods (that contain live cultures & will help repopulate his gut) or probiotics or both.  He could also suffer from die off like I mentioned above.  All these aren't reasons not to do it, just stuff to be aware of.

 

No, I have no way of getting it all done.  I'm a SAHM to three allergic (& tongue tied - do you know if he's tongue tied?  It could cause problems that you may not realize are related & you won't likely get support from medpros as it's not really on most of their radar, at all, unfortunately) kids, I & my husband cook almost everything from scratch (ds1 eats applegate hot dogs but food for me & ds2 has to be from scratch & even that is very limited because of corn contamination) & I've said it many times that even if I spent all day researching & deciding what I thought was best to do, I still wouldn't know & I would have gotten nothing else done.  My dh has started doing a lot more cooking so that helps but my house is a mess, I still have a pack-n-play up from when ds2 was born (he'll be 4 in July - it was alwasy just to hold diapers & clothes but still), I have piles of papers, I have to work on the legal paperwork to be submitted for my oldest as we home educate (and next year I'll have two to do because ds1 will be of legal age for that :-/), I've had my will & living will on my to-do list since the fall & I'm no further on it, I could go on & on about what I don't get done & I've spent the last week on the couch w/ ds2 because he's had a stomach bug, so I say I didn't get stuff done before, well, this week I've literally gotten nothing done.  I don't really think it's possible to get everything done when you have kids home w/ you even w/o these kinds of issues!  But, that's just IMO.

 

Gotta run.  Ds2 wants me back on the couch.  Doesn't look like I'm going to get to shower today.  greensad.gif

 

Sus

 

ETA - you can make yogurt out of plain coconut milk, a thermos & a safe probiotic.  PM me if you want the details.  It's quite simple, you just have to do it!

post #59 of 99
Thread Starter 

Some random things....

 

1. Just had a horrible thought.... The "gluten free" matzo I bought him (he likes crackers, but not the gluten free ones I found at Costco...) is made with "natural vinegar." Since it's labeled "gluten free" I have to assume that means NOT vinegar distilled from grain, correct? Anyone know what "natural vinegar" is?

 

2. I gave him coconut yogurt from TJ's and then realized it doesn't specifically say that it's gluten free. He seemed to have a digestive reaction to it, so I stopped giving it to him. Then today, I read somewhere else that coconut tends to be good for loosening things up and helping with constipation. Hard to know which is the real problem....

 

3. I'm afraid to keep giving him probiotics this young if it's going to have that effect on him. I'm afraid he'll get dehydrated or something.... I guess a naturopath would be a good source of info as to how to safely deal with the transition? I'm not sure how well-versed his ped is....

 

4. I love his ped. She specializes in drug-exposed infants. But she believes in vaxing and likely would not agree that the vaxes could be harmful to him. It can't hurt to ask, but I'm guessing that even if she did agree, a letter from her might not be enough for the state to agree to let his vaxes go. Rules are rules, you know. She is, however, completely open to writing referrals to any specialist I want. So far, we have GI and ENT follow ups and she agreed to a sleep study if we continue to have problems that aren't fixed by either of those two specialists. His neurologist wasn't impressed by his "issues" and said that "for his situation" he is doing just fine. When we were there, I didn't have enough experience with him  to know to question all these things.

 

5. Mama24-7, thanks for the reminder of the ugly things that happen during a cleanse. I'm not so sure it's a good idea for him, but I'd love to find a safe way to clean his system up! And I hope your LO feels better soon.

post #60 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swd12422 View Post

Some random things....

 

1. Just had a horrible thought.... The "gluten free" matzo I bought him (he likes crackers, but not the gluten free ones I found at Costco...) is made with "natural vinegar." Since it's labeled "gluten free" I have to assume that means NOT vinegar distilled from grain, correct? Anyone know what "natural vinegar" is?

 

Is apple cider vinegar just made from apples?

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