or Connect
Mothering › Groups › March 2013 Due Date Club › Discussions › What are you doing with your placenta?

What are you doing with your placenta? - Page 4

post #61 of 69
Wow! Your Mum has a really balanced perspective and sound ethos. How lucky to have someone that knowledgeable to advise you, and us. LOVING this discussion.

The point about the nutritional benefits not surviving cooking and preservation may not hold true when the raw placenta is used in smoothies, tinctures or dehydrated at low temperatures. It's the hormones I'm particularly interested in, not the otherwise easily obtained nutrients such as protein and iron. I'm not clear as to whether they'd survive either though.
Also, we would be staggering consumption, not taking one mega-dose, although other mammals do take the time to eat in one sitting! (For unknown reasons.)

As regards to possible dIsease in the placenta, wouldn't the mother already have it anyways making the risk from one's own placenta almost negligible? I don't think there's a likelihood of developing a 'mad human' disease from just 1 or 2 placentas and I've been reassured by other research that while placentas do filter toxins, they redirect to the kidneys and liver for elimination and therefore placenta is less toxin-laden than your average supermarket meat (which I actually avoid and choose organic when I do eat meat!)

It is clear that there is no proven benefits to placentaphagy, just anecdotal, which could be explained as placebo as naturally the women who would do this, are likely to be of a believing mindset. But the placebo effect is pretty powerful medicine too!

I'm tending towards disinclination myself but I might get it done and save it in the event of PPD, menopause or my kids own hormonal episodes.
There's a few other interesting links here for what it's worth http://placentanetwork.com/research-and-articles/
post #62 of 69

SlimP, I was discussing this with her again today, as I had some of the same thoughts.  She said infectious disease was only a minor concern as long as the mother was the only one consuming it, but she was definitely somewhat concerned about the toxin issue.  However, small/theoretical risk aside, the bigger issue to her was the unlikelihood (in her opinion) of much/any benefit.  She did feel that even freezing the placenta (let alone dehydrating it, cooking it, etc.) was likely to "deactivate" (my word, for lack of a better one) the hormonal benefit.  Now, if you consumed it raw, right away, okay, maybe.  But you can only do that for a few days or so before it starts to "go bad."  For reference-- not that she's THE expert, but just saying!-- she has decades of high-level experience in the drug and biologic approval process, as she referenced.  Just to say that she has found from extensive experience that so many of these promising compounds are sadly very "fragile."

 

I don't think the debate is closed, and it would be AWESOME to see some good clinical studies, as I'm sure we will eventually... but I also lean against consuming it now. 

post #63 of 69
Thanks Buko!

That's all fair enough. 'Dr Mom' might not be THE expert but with her experience she's as close to that as we're likely to get. If she thinks the hormonal components are too fragile to survive dehydration (even at low temps) and pulverisation, then I don't hold out much hope otherwise. I'm thinking the most likely therapeutic option would be raw smoothies for a couple of days......which I'm not sure I can do. And maybe there is a very good reason for my revulsion when I can swallow anything of plant origin, regardless of taste!

Did you read in those studies that the amniotic fluid contains many of the same components? I don't want to start all over but wouldn't that at least remove the organ meat risk? How on Earth would you catch and bottle that though, ha ha.
Gah, I'm reluctant to let this go but I guess I'll have to.......

Really appreciate the input on the subject and looking forward to more insights if and when applicable.
post #64 of 69
Quote:
If she thinks the hormonal components are too fragile to survive dehydration (even at low temps) and pulverisation, then I don't hold out much hope otherwise. I'm thinking the most likely therapeutic option would be raw smoothies for a couple of days......which I'm not sure I can do.

 

She said she can't be 110% sure, but thinks it's unlikely they'd survive, even at low temps.  I don't think raw smoothies are an overly bad idea, personally, though I'd say more for energy/whatever than making a dent in PPD.  You have great questions.  I wish-- as we all do!-- there were clearer answers!

post #65 of 69

Buko your mom sounds completely awesome.  You are so lucky to have sprung from someone like her!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beautifulnm View Post

I can eat meat off the bone, and love a bloody steak.. and feel it could be great IN THEORY because of anemia and my hopes to ward off PPD.. but I don't think I'll be taking it home in a doggy bag and haven't heard/seen any encapsulation services available here. I can just see a placenta in the freezer next to DH's frozen eel and squid for bait. Oops, took the wrong one........ Yeah.

 

yeahthat.gif  This is exactly what would happen in our house.

 

I am about the least squeamish person I know but the thought of eating my placenta squicks me out.  I am inclined to go with Buko's mom on this one.

post #66 of 69

Buko, I agree with the others, your mom sounds great.  My mom told me that animals eat their placenta so that other predators won't smell the blood and eat their young.  She said if I freeze (or otherwise dispose of) the placenta soon after the birth, no animal will come eat my child.  (She thinks she's funny... but since I don't plan on eating mine, I thought it was funny, too.)  I don't think she was pulling on her 20 years of maternity nursing to doll out that advice...  I like your mom's answer better!!  Slightly more thought put into it!!!!

post #67 of 69

Yeah on the animal thing - at the dairy farm I worked at, they try to keep the cows from eating the placentas because it can cause a massive imbalance, that much protein going in at once (even though it just came out). That having been said, bovine digestive systems aren't as adapted to concentrated sources of protein as ours.  And they don't always get to them in time and MOST of the time it's ok - BUT the fact that it's a potential hazard for them to eat it, rather than universally beneficial (there don't seem to be any benefits to the cows when they get sneaky and DO eat it) suggests that Kristin is right, the placenta-eating in animals, especially prey animals, is more about reducing signals to predators than it is about nutrition and recouping lost nutrients.  Evolutionarily, the benefits from predator avoidance would outweigh the risks of digestive issues.  I think it's one of those things that we can't just look at nature and say "oh, well all mammals do that so we should too" without really looking at the reasons WHY all mammals do it.

 

Do other great apes consume placentas?  I have no idea... worth looking into...

 

Edit: this is an interesting article.

post #68 of 69

Ooh, that IS an interesting article!

post #69 of 69

I know I haven't spend much time actively contributing to this DDC (I'm a pregnancy loss mama, and tend to be more active over at the expecting rainbow babies thread), but I wanted to chime in and say thanks for this great thread! All of this information is fantastic, women. 

  Return Home
  Back to Forum: March 2013 Due Date Club
Mothering › Groups › March 2013 Due Date Club › Discussions › What are you doing with your placenta?