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What Does a Day of Breastfeeding Your 2-Year Old Look Like? - Page 2

post #21 of 37

Jumping in here a bit late (and haven't read all the responses but plan to go back and read).  How I wish I would have had a forum like this when my LO was a toddler all-day, all-night nurser!!  Fast forward to 10 years later and I have what I consider a more typical toddler nursling. My second LO was really receptive to the "don't ask, don't refuse" idea - probably because I was offering way more than I realized. Although I am totally supportive of CLW and on some level wish that was something that would work for me, we are on the road to parent-led weaning.  We did a month of "don't ask, don't refuse" and are now doing a bit or distraction and offering food before the breast. I'm also having a lot of success with "Boobies go night-night" and have night nursing down to twox/night and one session at daybreak. 

 

Ok... I hope that doesn't sound like I've figured something out. I feel as thought I am a fairly similar mother to this easily weaned (so far) LO as I was to my first who was to my first who was an absolute breast fiend all day - seriously like 50 times a day nurser. If I had more support I feel really strongly that my first was a good candidate for CLW or quite a bit more time unrestricted at the breast because weaning her was really hard. This was a "when you know better you do better".  

 

Anyway, I sympathize and totally remember those days and feel like that's just how some kids are at that age. From my experience with my two kids, one was ready for some gentle parent-led weaning steps by around 2 and the other was most certainly not. 

post #22 of 37
Thread Starter 

Thanks, IdentityCrisisMama! smile.gif It does help to have that support - this thread has been very comforting & validating for me, and I appreciate your perspective having had one of each.

 

It kind of cracks me up when people can count daily nursings on one hand, and I can't even begin to keep track of sessions - or even total hours in a day! dizzy.gif  So I liked your "seriously 50 times a day" because that's a number that makes much more sense to me. winky.gif

 

Was your super nurser also a high needs baby/kiddo?

post #23 of 37

Oh, I know, right? When my super nurser was little I probably could have kept track of how often she nursed in 15 minute period and done the math. eyesroll.gif ROTFLMAO.gif

 

My first was not high-needs other than wanting to be worn all day, snuggled all night and nursed at will. Other than that she was pretty easy.  It occurs to me writing that out that some people would define that as high needs. 

post #24 of 37
:-D

Hi identitycrisismama, would it be too nosey to ask what your first born's personality is like now? My son has very similiar preferences so I do find myself wondering ...
Edited by susanmary - 2/7/13 at 3:29am
post #25 of 37

what a wonderful mother you are....Kudos for mother of the year award

post #26 of 37

PICKLE 18...what a wonderful mother you are...Kudos to you for mother of the year....try making popsicles out of your breastmilk and try blending bananas or other fruit in with your breastmilk...before freezing....hot chocolat with brestmilk ....its amazing but it works to cut down on the required time he needs to be attached to you ...giving you some more deserved freedom

post #27 of 37

I just found this thread, and I'm so happy I'm not alone! My DD turned 2 late last month, and she's still a frequent nurser. She doesn't nurse quite as much during the day as some of your kids, and she almost never asks in public anymore, but, if we're sitting down at home with stories or a movie she always wants to nurse. She also wants to nurse randomly throughout the day, sometimes just little spurts of a few minutes and sometimes the little spurts turn into 30-60 minute sessions. She nurses for comfort and she also seems to want to nurse sometimes just because it's there. She brings her baby dolls and stuffed animals and asks me to nurse them, and after watching them for a minute she'll want to join in the nursing party :).

 

She nurses to fall asleep for her nap and at night, and nurses frequently throughout the night. We co-sleep, and she's gotten big enough and moves around enough that DH has moved to another room at night. I've contemplated trying to nurse her to sleep in her room and then leaving her (I'm able to get up after she falls asleep both for her nap and at night) to see if not having the breasts right next to her might encourage her to sleep more, but I haven't dared try that yet.

 

Aside from wanting to nurse more than the average two year old, I wouldn't call her a high needs kid. She wanted to be worn pretty much all the time as an infant, but, once she started walking, she became very independent. She plays on her own more happily than her almost 8 year old brother. She always cries initially when I leave her in the church nursery, with a babysitter, etc, but she's always playing happily within a few minutes. She's quite laid back, doesn't get upset easily, and, though she does throw the occasional two year old tantrum, she's a breeze compared to her big brother. 

 

DH would like me to start weaning her, particularly at night, but I love that nursing gives us a special bond and I'm loathe to give it up.

 

FYI, I did child led weaning with her brother, who is now almost 8 years old. He night weaned himself at four months, but day nursing went on until shortly after his 4th birthday.  He just gradually tapered off day weaning the older he got. He was a big comfort nurser and always wanted to nurse if he was hurt or upset, but a few minutes of nursing would satisfy him and then he'd go back to playing. After he weaned, he still needed a comfort object. He absolutely needs to grab a stuffed animal when he's upset, and he gets upset more easily than his two year old sister.

post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by susanmary View Post

:-D

Hi identitycrisismama, would it be too nosey to ask what your first born's personality is like now? My son has very similiar preferences so I do find myself wondering ...

No, not at all. I love talking about my children. orngbiggrin.gif  My first is pretty awesome and plenty independent. In fact, she has been pressuring me to go overseas for a semester and she's only 11. I don't necessarily think that "AP" makes "better kids" (or at least that's now why I parent the way that I do) but I can say that I don't buy the criticism or fear that AP makes clingy or spoiled kids either. Mine was a very attached infant and toddler but then surpassed a lot of her peers in autonomy, confidence and etc. by about 5 years old. Right now she is a sweet,resilient, well adjusted 11 year old kid.  love.gif

post #29 of 37
Awe....she sounds absolutely wonderful! Thanks so much! :-D
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

No, not at all. I love talking about my children. orngbiggrin.gif  My first is pretty awesome and plenty independent. In fact, she has been pressuring me to go overseas for a semester and she's only 11. I don't necessarily think that "AP" makes "better kids" (or at least that's now why I parent the way that I do) but I can say that I don't buy the criticism or fear that AP makes clingy or spoiled kids either. Mine was a very attached infant and toddler but then surpassed a lot of her peers in autonomy, confidence and etc. by about 5 years old. Right now she is a sweet,resilient, well adjusted 11 year old kid.  love.gif


Well, this is nice to know! We've been doing AP all along, and one thing I have definitely noticed is that my 32 mo old boy is pretty darned attached, as in: will not generally stand to have me out of his sight. I had thought (from the original studies on attachment) that "attached" babies were generally more ok with being apart from mom. So I have worried that I had done some aspect "wrong" since he is pretty clingy. I had an old grandma tell me that "his problem is your problem" meaning that it was because I carried him too much:(. But it is nice to hear that that strong feeling of independence maybe just down the road still.

post #31 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentuckymom View Post

She nurses for comfort and she also seems to want to nurse sometimes just because it's there. She brings her baby dolls and stuffed animals and asks me to nurse them, and after watching them for a minute she'll want to join in the nursing party :).

 

 I love this!  We have been doing tons of that, too - dinosaurs, elephants, even trucks are all "hungry" or they "fell down" or what have you and need some milkies. winky.gif So sweet!

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyrabbitfly View Post


Well, this is nice to know! We've been doing AP all along, and one thing I have definitely noticed is that my 32 mo old boy is pretty darned attached, as in: will not generally stand to have me out of his sight. I had thought (from the original studies on attachment) that "attached" babies were generally more ok with being apart from mom. So I have worried that I had done some aspect "wrong" since he is pretty clingy. I had an old grandma tell me that "his problem is your problem" meaning that it was because I carried him too much:(. But it is nice to hear that that strong feeling of independence maybe just down the road still.

 

I agree.  My son is a velcro kiddo, but I try to remember these years pass so quickly, and in the grand scheme of things, he will be this attached only once in his life.  I do believe in the idea that meeting a child's needs at the time will build a more confident adult, vs. an adult who is still seeking to fulfill/mend unmet needs (I'm tired, so not stating that very well - but it's great to see that's been your experience already with your budding mini-adult, IdentityCrisisMama!).  

post #32 of 37
Wow, I'm amazed reading this thread. You moms are awesome!!

I HAD to nightwean my toddler at 10 months because with two babies 14 months apart and working 40 hours a week, I just physically could not handle the lack of sleep. I knew I had to do it when upon waking every morning I would burst into tears. Over nothing other than being so completely drained.

So, coming from a single working mother of two, I nurse my toddler anywhere from 3-7 times a day. And I pump while at work so my oldest can enjoy the benefits of BM too.

Lately I've started waking up Cody around midnight when I get off work, to have an "extra" session of nursing. He loves it. I love the quiet time and extra cuddles I get......think I might keep it up. smile.gif

But I tell you what. If I had the blessing of being a SAHM, my baby would back in my bed sleeping with me and we'd be night nursing. Just can't handle it right now greensad.gif
post #33 of 37
Shanesmom you are amazing!! Single working mom of two, 14 months apart?! Holy moley! I'm anxious just thinking about baby #2 although DD will be 28 months old (SO much easier than 14), I'm a SAHM and have a very supportive and wonderful partner. You are doing a wonderful job for your kids and giving all you can in very tough circumstances. Big hugs and huge kudos to you!!
post #34 of 37
Totally agree with PP and thanks Shanesmon for making me appreciate the perks of our situation here. :-)
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by skycheattraffic View Post

Shanesmom you are amazing!! Single working mom of two, 14 months apart?! Holy moley! I'm anxious just thinking about baby #2 although DD will be 28 months old (SO much easier than 14), I'm a SAHM and have a very supportive and wonderful partner. You are doing a wonderful job for your kids and giving all you can in very tough circumstances. Big hugs and huge kudos to you!!

 

<3

post #36 of 37
Thread Starter 

I completely agree!  Shanesmom - I am in awe of you.  Hats off to you! tiphat.gif  I can't imagine juggling that many challenges, and I love your addition of the midnight nursing.  So sweet! luxlove.gif You definitely do make me appreciate my situation all the more, and as I've said about the nursing upthread, it's just what we do - it's not a heavy burden, he's just my little guy and needs what he needs, so it's how we roll - and there are many who are carrying alot more, juggling even more needs, and you are one of them. Kudos!

post #37 of 37

Omgosh, thank you guys for all the kind words!! It means a lot

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