or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Common Core? - Page 2

post #21 of 481

A further thought - as mar123 explained, this is basically a Quality Improvement program. A fundamental tool of QI is benchmarking. If you can't measure it, you can't manage it - or improve it. I don't know if 70/30 are arbitrary numbers pulled out of the air or carefully calculated but benchmarking does explain the rationale for having some kind of ratio. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post

The standards came about as a way to make sure students in different states are receiving the same high quality education. Education here is really all on the state level and as such, the students graduate with a huge differential in terms of ability and knowledge. 

 

LOL, I'm sure that will open up a nice can of worms about applying business principles to educational policy......

post #22 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

A further thought - as mar123 explained, this is basically a Quality Improvement program. 

 

Oh I understand that it's part of a quality improvement program. What I don't understand is why this particular part of it (mandating a % of non-fiction across all grades) really does that. It seems so arbitrary and simplistic. If you've got to measure, I can think of a lot of things it would make more sense to measure. To me teacher and student choice in reading material (especially in the elementary years), including the choice of non-fiction vs. fiction, seems extremely important in ensuring student motivation and engagement in learning.

 

Miranda

post #23 of 481

I'm with you, Miranda.  It makes no sense as things are stated.  Is the percentage as by number of words? Pages? Time in instruction?  Is a poem that leads to a 2 day class discussion less

 

At the moment, DD's in 5th grade, and the school is just starting to make this transition in the percentage reading standard.  DD is reading 3x the literature in her language arts class than some of her peers, so presumably she either needs to stop doing that much reading, and her teacher needs to stop fostering her love of reading and literature, and finally motivating her to take care in her writing as a result, or she needs to read more science and history, too. 

 

I understand the concept of "quality control" and "rigorous standards" and "21st century" and "global competition" rhetoric.  I also see a set of standards that seem to be leading to an interpretation amongst district curriculum planners that sees these standards as both the floor and the ceiling for the curriculum.  Many kids in our district are straining against the ceiling of these standards, not able to progress faster or deeper into the material.  It sounds like other kids are struggling to keep up, as the schools have chosen curricula that hit each topic very quickly with little depth or accommodation for the need to solidify skills. 

 

My only hope is that after the first few years of this, the teachers will start to put more of their own influence into this to alter content to be appropriate to the kids in their class.  For now, it seems very klutzy and boring.
 

post #24 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

 If you've got to measure, I can think of a lot of things it would make more sense to measure. 

 

 

 

There are probably many other metrics. This is likely just one of them but it's the one getting a lot of attention and discussion. Probably because it is simplistic and easy to focus on. It would be very odd if this is the only aspect that is being measured in a comprehensive curriculum. 

post #25 of 481
Of course it's not. And there is no stopping teachers (at least at the elementary level) from incorporating more fiction into their day and children from self-selecting fiction during free reading time and from the school library.
post #26 of 481

These standards in no way say that a child should be reading 70% non-fiction; it's all about comprehensive instruction. Also, some people are so intent (teachers mostly) on complaining about this, that they create problems that simply aren't there. The 70% is measured by pieces. If a child reads 10 pieces of text in a week (including textbook readings), it is expected that 7 of them will be non-fiction. If a child reads portions of a text each day for science and social social studies, that's ten pieces right there.

post #27 of 481
You are the only person I know who talks about the percentages. The teachers in my kids school, and those on my education lists, don't. Just that there is a lot of non-fiction. My kids don't have textbooks. I haven't seen any of those in any classrooms other than 5th grade. I am soooooo glad basal readers are a thing of the past. I always hated teaching with those.
post #28 of 481

My 3rd grader was complaining in the car today that they've just started reviewing non-fiction again in class. She said they did a story "Because of Winn-Dixie" in Dec and just one other story in Jan and only one week of poetry (she loves to write stories and poems both and she has typed 30 pages of a book she's writing so far), but for the rest of the year they've been doing non-fiction. She says non-fiction is totally boring because they're just reviewing how to find stuff, etc., and it's too easy. She is actually pulled out for a gifted reading program so I'm not too worried about the emphasis on non-fiction since she does get extra fiction in the gifted group, but she would certainly enjoy more fiction, poetry, plays, etc., and is not challenged by the non-fiction. 

 

They are actively studying "non-fiction" in her class. It's not just integrated into other classes because she's in 3rd grade and they don't have other classes beyond specials. 

post #29 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polliwog View Post

You are the only person I know who talks about the percentages. The teachers in my kids school, and those on my education lists, don't. Just that there is a lot of non-fiction. My kids don't have textbooks. I haven't seen any of those in any classrooms other than 5th grade. I am soooooo glad basal readers are a thing of the past. I always hated teaching with those.

Unfortunately, basal readers are still alive and kicking in our district. My kids HATE them. As do I.
post #30 of 481
Yuck. I'm so sorry.
post #31 of 481

The percentage comes from all the inservices I have had on CCSS; it is what is recomended by Common Core.

 

So, are you saying none of your child's teachers use any textbooks at all? What do the teachers use to reinforce lessons? Do they print out the readings they use? The students should be reading something. I know many schools now have only class sets of the books and the books are also completely available online. I admit that I use my textbook only for certain readings; I use maybe 30% of it, but we do have one and it is a guide.


Edited by mar123 - 4/10/13 at 9:56am
post #32 of 481

My child has reading packets (printed out) for homework and math worksheets. I don't know if they use a textbook in the classroom or not. They do use a lot of online resources. In the gifted pullout reading group they do have a reader they're working with which she loves. I can't remember what story they were reading, but I recognized the title. I'll try to remember to ask her. 

 

My 6th grader goes to a charter school and they have a few textbooks, but they mostly stay at school. They have a science textbook and a math textbook, but they do a lot of work from other sources, too (printed packets and online).

post #33 of 481

That makes sense. Most of those reading packets will come from a CD that the teacher gets from the textbook company. Our students get a book to bring home, and we have a class set (we are a 4x4 block schedule school, so the students only have 4 classes a semester. It means we have enough textbooks to do this). Textbooks are so ridiculously heavy, that most schools no longer expect the student to go back and forth from home with them.

post #34 of 481

So, I asked. She said in her gifted reading group they use the Junior Great Books collection (one book — sort of an anthology I guess). She said they don't have a math book, but do math on the board, and they're reviewing "non-fiction" for reading class.

post #35 of 481
DS is in second grade. No reading, social studies, science, or Spanish text books. They read lots of short books (the guided reading room has lots of group sets for each level,) magazines, stuff online, etc. There is a math text book for the SMARTBoard, and the teacher prints out practice sheets (from the book company, from a teacher supply store, or homemade) for in class practice and homework. My kindergartner has basically the same thing but doesn't have many worksheets.

Elementary school (especially K-3) is very different from high school and very different from the way things were when "I" started teaching.
post #36 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post

So, I asked. She said in her gifted reading group they use the Junior Great Books collection (one book — sort of an anthology I guess). 

 

Junior Great Books anthologies are great! I used to pick them up on eBay for my homeschooled kids because they contain such rich varied collections of real stories.

 

Miranda

post #37 of 481

Hi There,

 

I have just started to learn about this (my daughter is 17 months old), and it is horrifying what they are doing under our noses.  They plan to turn our kids against us, promote indoctrination, and use collected data to psychologically profile the kid's future.  The degree of data mining, invasion of privacy, brain washing, and cutting out State and parental control is very alarming.

 

Check out this you tube video which gives a overview

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coRNJluF2O4

 

Read this great article which provides additional info and links.

http://www.surpriseteapartypatriots.com/docs/sources-presentation-michael-2013-03-11.pdf

 

this is serious, it will fundamentally change our country and it needs to stop.

post #38 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leemama View Post

Hi There,

I have just started to learn about this (my daughter is 17 months old), and it is horrifying what they are doing under our noses.  They plan to turn our kids against us, promote indoctrination, and use collected data to psychologically profile the kid's future.
  The degree of data mining, invasion of privacy, brain washing, and cutting out State and parental control is very alarming.

Check out this you tube video which gives a overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coRNJluF2O4

Read this great article which provides additional info and links.
http://www.surpriseteapartypatriots.com/docs/sources-presentation-michael-2013-03-11.pdf

this is serious, it will fundamentally change our country and it needs to stop.
Ummmmm. No.
post #39 of 481
Have you actually VISITED a school in a state that has adopted the CC? It's a set of academic standards that is consistent from state to state. Each state/district/school is free to choose the curriculum materials, and methods, they will use to meet those standards. The CC may have it's drawbacks, and strengthths, but it's mission is not to subvert anything.
post #40 of 481

No I have not been to a common core class.  I would love to but my daughter is only 17 months old.  I don’t want to demonize common core as this evil project with nothing good.  I believe that it does provide a broader scope of subjects and more critical thinking which I do love.  What I worry about, is the outcome of having a nationalized standards which doesn’t allow for State and Parental control.

 

Common core was just recently adapted and high school students are not just taking the developed common core tests without supported curricula.  The most controversial changes happens in high school where kids are faced with more tests that doesn't reflect what is currently being taught.

 See the school boycotting the tests around the nation.  

 

http://www.parenting.com/blogs/mom-congress/kate-goodin/common-core-tests?src=SOC&dom=tw

 

I totally get that the common core is a set of "standards" not curriculum.  However, common core is aligned to the tests they will be given (still being developed).  So in the end, the curriculum will be dictated by the tests.  

 

But what's more alarming than anything else, is how common core was put in place through bribery from the federal government's "race to the top" grant, basically, the federal government said that if you want free money, then you will agree to adopt the common core standards.  

 

Even though, the federal government is prohibited by law to control the "curriculum" on the State level.  And many people at this point would argue that the common core are simply "standards" to follow by and each State can still have freedom to chose what they want to teach.  However, Common Core also include extensive testing which ties to the standards.  Eventually, if you want the students to do well, you MUST align your curriculum to the Common core standards and tests.  

 

Once fully implemented (that has not happen yet but we're moving there in 2014), it will take away State or parental control to modify the standards to fit the needs of the demographic.  Since there’s still yet much to be learned, they should allow for room to improvement shouldn’t it?  Let’s keep the good and improve the bad within common core? NO, the federal government says if you want to adapt common core, you can’t change the standards.  You can add up to 15% of your own standards, but it will not be included in the tests.  So modify at the expense robbing students their time to study for what’s relevant to the test (ie their future).  This just doesn’t sound right to me.

 

Common core is heavily funds through the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, student data are tracked and stored by a company owned by Bill Gates.  Now more and more corporations are stepping up to endorse Common Core with advertisements that cost thousands (Exxon, GE, Google).  Why such involvement and investment for the corporate world?  Because once sweeping national standards along with tests are implemented.  They will wipe out all options and the companie that owns the copyrights to common core will stand to monopolize on teaching and training materials. 

 

Also what about the data mining?  I have a 126 page report issued by the Department of Education talking about the technology they plan to use to track our children.  There are examples/pictures with eye movement scanning camera, brain wave scanning, posture tracking chair…etc.  I’m not even kidding that this was release and can still be downloaded. (SEE pg 62). 

 

http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/technology/files/2013/02/OET-Draft-Grit-Report-2-17-13.pdf

 

Okay, so you can say I am over-reacting with these technology, they are there to better personalize student learning.  And that’s where the trouble comes in.  The data mining allowed by Common Core technology also allows “any school official” to release these highly personal data to anyone they deemed relevant to the student’s learning.  To me, if that’s not invasion of privacy, I don’t know what is.

 

In the end, I am just left with so many questions.

 

- If Common Core is so good, then why does the federal government need to bribe State government to adopt it? (States who don't adopt are penalized)

- Why won’t they allow room for modification?  

- Why is the private sector so heavily vested?  

- Why all the data mining?  (Technology is not cheap, and guess who’s paying for it? The taxpayers, after the grant runs out)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at School