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The sun is out in the NW and I'm wondering about sunscreen

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
What do you use? The ingredients in regular sunscreen concern me enough to know I don't really want to slather it on DD everyday but I definitely don't want her to burn. I'd rather use the chemicals tho than her burn but am looking for advice on alternatives? Maybe just covering her up more but damn then she's hot. . .
looking for any input here
post #2 of 10

Badger has a great all natural mineral sunscreen that doesn't use nano particles. Skin Deep Database has lists of relatively safe sunscreens, including mineral, non-nano barriers (which are, I think, considered most safe).

 

Our daughter is blonde and blue eyed, so she's susceptible to burning. This summer we'll do a combination of coconut and/or shea butter for normal days out and about and the Badger all natural for days when we're in the sun for extended periods of time and she can't be easily covered.  We'll be investing in a good sun hat too.

 

http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/

post #3 of 10
I too use the ewg site. my son is 2.5 now. when he was a baby I was surprised that badger irritated his skin. I didn't know about ewg then so we went with California baby. now I see there are so many options. his skin is less sensitive now so we use a non greasy one. guess I'm just saying you m might be surprised what they are sensitive to buy there are plenty of options and things change year to year.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
I love cocnut oil for almost everything and had read that it is a good sun barrier but haven't tested it out on myself and am wondering of the UV protection it offers. . .any comments on that?
Edited by MaddMom41 - 3/31/13 at 8:08pm
post #5 of 10

MaddMom, I just found a post that mentioned that coconut oil actually only has an SPF of about 4.  I have no idea how good this research is... you'd have to track down the original study cited at the bottom of blog post. 

 

http://www.naturalnutritionadvisor.com/blog/?p=981

post #6 of 10

We cover up. The kids wear long sleeve rash guards pretty often. Cheaper and safer than sunscreen. 

post #7 of 10

I let my kids play progressively longer in the sun until they tan.  To counteract the minimal damage to their cells I'm sure to feed them a diet high in antioxidants.  I believe people were made to be in the sun.

 

Now, my kids tan pretty readily, so this doesn't seem to be a huge deal for them.  If they do need a bit of help I usually grab the coconut oil.  It is very greasy but it helps.

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazurii View Post

I let my kids play progressively longer in the sun until they tan.  To counteract the minimal damage to their cells I'm sure to feed them a diet high in antioxidants.  I believe people were made to be in the sun.

 

Now, my kids tan pretty readily, so this doesn't seem to be a huge deal for them.  If they do need a bit of help I usually grab the coconut oil.  It is very greasy but it helps.

I think it is worth noting that that radiation from the sun has increased and is more potent than before because of the damaged ozone layer and that human migration has moved people very far from their historic roots (cancer rates of Caucasions in Australia are very high for this reason).

 

This isn't the good old days.

post #9 of 10

From this page:

 

 

Quote:
In the less favourable belt (35-45° N), the scattering of the solar radiation is significantly increased because of the higher latitudes and lower solar altitude. In addition, cloudiness and atmospheric pollution are important factors that tend to reduce sharply the solar radiation intensity. However, regions beyond 45° N have less favourable conditions for the use of direct solar radiation. This is because almost half of it is in the form of scattered radiation, which is more difficult to collect for use. This limitation, however, does not strictly apply to the potentials for solar UVR applications.

 

From Wikipedia:

 

 

Quote:
Melanin is produced by cells called melanocytes in a process called melanogenesis. Melanocytes produce two types of melanin: pheomelanin (red) and eumelanin (very dark brown). Melanin protects the body by absorbing solar radiation.

 

From this page (well referenced):

 

 

Quote:
In an analysis of the medical literature, researchers concluded that 10 weeks' supplementation with beta carotene protects against sunburn and that the protective effect was increased with each additional month of supplementation.12 Similarly, vitamins E and C have UV-radiation protective effects. Supplementation with vitamins C and E was shown to significantly reduce the levels of free radicals inside of cells that had previously been exposed to UVB light radiation.13

 

 

We keep the kids out of the sun at the times of greatest solar radiation.  But we also expect our bodies to perform their functions.  My kids have never burned.  They eat foods with many and varied antioxidants.  We also know how important it is for us to get natural Vitamin D during the months we can produce it, since living in the Portland area means that we don't produce any during the winter.  We feel very confident in our strategy.

post #10 of 10
Our family burns easily, we do our best to stay out of the sun during the peak hours. We also use Solrx sunscreen, I've never seen it in local stores (VT) so we order online from their website. UVA/UVB protection, no nanotechnology partials, no papa, no parables, and economic friendly. It is a certified 8 hour sunscreen they discuss the testing and results on their website. We started using it last year and love it. We put it on in the morning and it last the majority of the day. If it's a long day in the sun then we reapply in the afternoon to be safe.
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